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RE: New bolt together lathe pics

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  • rigmatch
    Many thanks I had thought about a 4+ piece of pipe or a piece of a concrete slab as the bed. To cut down the size of the headstock I was going to use 1.25
    Message 1 of 17 , Sep 27, 2013

      Many thanks

      I had thought about a 4+" piece of pipe or a piece of a concrete slab as the bed. To cut down the size of the headstock I was going to use 1.25" pillow blocks. I can't get Surplus Center to tell me how much play they have so to be safe, the front bearing could be a premium brand or have an adjuster like is used on the MM spindle.


      Pat



      ---In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, <nojoeco@...> wrote:

      Ok, so before I start drawing the wrong thing. We're talking about a scaled up version of the bolt together lathe from popular mechanics, with possibly a little Romig-ness thrown in. Dual pipes for ways instead of one(or a larger pipe and flat plate?) and a goal of being able to have a majority of the parts fairly transportable. I'm guessing that if we go with a cement base then it's assumed that's built at the site.

      After looking at the pdf it's strangely like some of my own work as I'm using machined pipe fittings for a german equitorial type mount.

      I've been busy lately with a broken water system at the home/ranch. But I'm back at the computer for a bit.

      -Hope everyone is doing alright.





      ---In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, <multimachine@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

      Thanks Guys
      The lathe I was talking about is in "files" as Bolt together lathe. What interested me was the possibility of a similar but larger one. The pipe frame shown in the plans would not be used but would replaced by a larger piece of pipe or a concrete slab at the destination. In effect it would be a Romig 6" lathe with the ways but not the bed. The headstock and small motor could go in one suitcase and the ways and cross slide in another. Add a thread follower and someone would have the ability to make bushings, nuts and bolts, anywhere.

      Pat


      On Monday, September 23, 2013 1:00 AM, Ian Newman <ian_new@...> wrote:
       
      Hi,

      Watchmakers lathes and "turns" have been around for a few hundred years, cut metal and fit in a box that you can carry as hand luggage.

      All the best,
      Ian



      From: keith gutshall <drpshops@...>
      To: "multimachine@yahoogroups.com" <multimachine@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Sunday, 22 September 2013, 23:19
      Subject: Re: [multimachine] New bolt together lathe pics

       
      Hi Pat
       Thinking about a tranportable lathe, it sounds like a good idea, but would weight
       be a problem for the machine?
       I have a smaller machine that I take to shows,and things. It is a fairly light weight wood
      lathe, but it still weights about 50 pounds.
       Even with a small motor 1/3HP weights about 25 pounds.
       
       You open an interesting problem, can you make a machine that is light enought to move
      easy, but be strong enought to turn metal?
       
       What is the size of something you can carry on an airplane?
       
       Keith
       
       
      Deep Run Portage
      Back Shop
      " The Lizard Works"
      From: "rigmatch@..." <rigmatch@...>
      To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, September 22, 2013 1:55 PM
      Subject: [multimachine] New bolt together lathe pics
       
      I need to close out the posters for SXSW eco in the next few days, If anyone has any drawings that are remotely usable, I hope they will get them to me. An air transportable lathe might get some traction there.

      Pat




    • keith gutshall
      Hi Pat You might want to look at this for pillow block bearings   www.thebigbearingstore.com       They have some styles of bearing the surplus center
      Message 2 of 17 , Sep 28, 2013
        Hi Pat
        You might want to look at this for pillow block bearings
         
         
         They have some styles of bearing the surplus center does not have.
         
         Keith
         
        Deep Run Portage
        Back Shop
        " The Lizard Works"
        From: "rigmatch@..." <rigmatch@...>
        To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, September 27, 2013 9:45 AM
        Subject: [multimachine] RE: New bolt together lathe pics
         
        Many thanks
        I had thought about a 4+" piece of pipe or a piece of a concrete slab as the bed. To cut down the size of the headstock I was going to use 1.25" pillow blocks. I can't get Surplus Center to tell me how much play they have so to be safe, the front bearing could be a premium brand or have an adjuster like is used on the MM spindle.

        Pat
        ---In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, <nojoeco@...> wrote:
        Ok, so before I start drawing the wrong thing. We're talking about a scaled up version of the bolt together lathe from popular mechanics, with possibly a little Romig-ness thrown in. Dual pipes for ways instead of one(or a larger pipe and flat plate?) and a goal of being able to have a majority of the parts fairly transportable. I'm guessing that if we go with a cement base then it's assumed that's built at the site.
        After looking at the pdf it's strangely like some of my own work as I'm using machined pipe fittings for a german equitorial type mount.
        I've been busy lately with a broken water system at the home/ranch. But I'm back at the computer for a bit.
        -Hope everyone is doing alright.


        ---In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, <multimachine@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
        Thanks Guys
        The lathe I was talking about is in "files" as Bolt together lathe. What interested me was the possibility of a similar but larger one. The pipe frame shown in the plans would not be used but would replaced by a larger piece of pipe or a concrete slab at the destination. In effect it would be a Romig 6" lathe with the ways but not the bed. The headstock and small motor could go in one suitcase and the ways and cross slide in another. Add a thread follower and someone would have the ability to make bushings, nuts and bolts, anywhere.

        Pat
        On Monday, September 23, 2013 1:00 AM, Ian Newman <ian_new@...> wrote:
         
        Hi, Watchmakers lathes and "turns" have been around for a few hundred years, cut metal and fit in a box that you can carry as hand luggage. All the best, Ian


        From: keith gutshall <drpshops@...>
        To: "multimachine@yahoogroups.com" <multimachine@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sunday, 22 September 2013, 23:19
        Subject: Re: [multimachine] New bolt together lathe pics
         
        Hi Pat
         Thinking about a tranportable lathe, it sounds like a good idea, but would weight
         be a problem for the machine?
         I have a smaller machine that I take to shows,and things. It is a fairly light weight wood
        lathe, but it still weights about 50 pounds.
         Even with a small motor 1/3HP weights about 25 pounds.
         
         You open an interesting problem, can you make a machine that is light enought to move
        easy, but be strong enought to turn metal?
         
         What is the size of something you can carry on an airplane?
         
         Keith
         
         
        Deep Run Portage Back Shop " The Lizard Works"
        From: "rigmatch@..." <rigmatch@...>
        To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sunday, September 22, 2013 1:55 PM
        Subject: [multimachine] New bolt together lathe pics
         
        I need to close out the posters for SXSW eco in the next few days, If anyone has any drawings that are remotely usable, I hope they will get them to me. An air transportable lathe might get some traction there.

        Pat
      • Pat Delany
        Many thanks Keith Looks like a great store. If I was going to fly a lathe half way around the world, I think I would choose a Timken $135 1.25 bearing for the
        Message 3 of 17 , Sep 28, 2013
          Many thanks Keith
          Looks like a great store.

          If I was going to fly a lathe half way around the world, I think I would choose a Timken $135 1.25" bearing for the spindle end. A cheaper one would probably be fine for the other end.

          For home use, I would try a cheap one at the chuck end and make an adjuster to preload it if necessary to prevent chatter. Very careful fitting of the ways and cross slide will be necessary since this will be a very light duty machine probably used to machine poor quality steel.

          Could be worth the effort because it may be the only way to get nuts and bolts in remote areas that are isolated for months at a time. A thread follower and a premium set of taps and dies should always be included.

          Pat


          On Saturday, September 28, 2013 7:16 PM, keith gutshall <drpshops@...> wrote:
           
          Hi Pat
          You might want to look at this for pillow block bearings
           
           
           They have some styles of bearing the surplus center does not have.
           
           Keith
           
          Deep Run Portage
          Back Shop
          " The Lizard Works"
          From: "rigmatch@..." <rigmatch@...>
          To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Friday, September 27, 2013 9:45 AM
          Subject: [multimachine] RE: New bolt together lathe pics
           
          Many thanks
          I had thought about a 4+" piece of pipe or a piece of a concrete slab as the bed. To cut down the size of the headstock I was going to use 1.25" pillow blocks. I can't get Surplus Center to tell me how much play they have so to be safe, the front bearing could be a premium brand or have an adjuster like is used on the MM spindle.

          Pat
          ---In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, <nojoeco@...> wrote:
          Ok, so before I start drawing the wrong thing. We're talking about a scaled up version of the bolt together lathe from popular mechanics, with possibly a little Romig-ness thrown in. Dual pipes for ways instead of one(or a larger pipe and flat plate?) and a goal of being able to have a majority of the parts fairly transportable. I'm guessing that if we go with a cement base then it's assumed that's built at the site.
          After looking at the pdf it's strangely like some of my own work as I'm using machined pipe fittings for a german equitorial type mount.
          I've been busy lately with a broken water system at the home/ranch. But I'm back at the computer for a bit.
          -Hope everyone is doing alright.


          ---In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, <multimachine@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
          Thanks Guys
          The lathe I was talking about is in "files" as Bolt together lathe. What interested me was the possibility of a similar but larger one. The pipe frame shown in the plans would not be used but would replaced by a larger piece of pipe or a concrete slab at the destination. In effect it would be a Romig 6" lathe with the ways but not the bed. The headstock and small motor could go in one suitcase and the ways and cross slide in another. Add a thread follower and someone would have the ability to make bushings, nuts and bolts, anywhere.

          Pat
          On Monday, September 23, 2013 1:00 AM, Ian Newman <ian_new@...> wrote:
           
          Hi, Watchmakers lathes and "turns" have been around for a few hundred years, cut metal and fit in a box that you can carry as hand luggage. All the best, Ian


          From: keith gutshall <drpshops@...>
          To: "multimachine@yahoogroups.com" <multimachine@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Sunday, 22 September 2013, 23:19
          Subject: Re: [multimachine] New bolt together lathe pics
           
          Hi Pat
           Thinking about a tranportable lathe, it sounds like a good idea, but would weight
           be a problem for the machine?
           I have a smaller machine that I take to shows,and things. It is a fairly light weight wood
          lathe, but it still weights about 50 pounds.
           Even with a small motor 1/3HP weights about 25 pounds.
           
           You open an interesting problem, can you make a machine that is light enought to move
          easy, but be strong enought to turn metal?
           
           What is the size of something you can carry on an airplane?
           
           Keith
           
           
          Deep Run Portage Back Shop " The Lizard Works"
          From: "rigmatch@..." <rigmatch@...>
          To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sunday, September 22, 2013 1:55 PM
          Subject: [multimachine] New bolt together lathe pics
           
          I need to close out the posters for SXSW eco in the next few days, If anyone has any drawings that are remotely usable, I hope they will get them to me. An air transportable lathe might get some traction there.

          Pat


        • David G. LeVine
          ... Good find, expensive but useful! A 2 M2000 bearuing is $225.37, not cheap, but not unobtainable. Dave 8{) -- A word to the wise ain t necessary - it s
          Message 4 of 17 , Sep 28, 2013
            On 09/28/2013 08:16 PM, keith gutshall wrote:

            Hi Pat
            You might want to look at this for pillow block bearings
             
             
             They have some styles of bearing the surplus center does not have.
             
             Keith

            Good find, expensive but useful!

            A 2" M2000 bearuing is $225.37, not cheap, but not unobtainable.

            Dave  8{)

            --

            "A word to the wise ain't necessary - it's the stupid ones that need the advice."

            Bill Cosby
          • David G. LeVine
            ... Actually, I will suggest a subset of taps and dies would be wiser. There is very little need for smaller than #10 taps and dies in making a lathe, and
            Message 5 of 17 , Sep 28, 2013
              On 09/28/2013 10:16 PM, Pat Delany wrote:
              A thread follower and a premium set of taps and dies should always be included.

              Actually, I will suggest a subset of taps and dies would be wiser.  There is very little need for smaller than #10 taps and dies in making a lathe, and above 3/8" may be very limited until you get to spindle sized threads.  Similarly, M4 is the smallest I can imagine and M6 may be the smallest we will really need.  By limiting the number, better quality taps and dies can be obtained. 

              A good tap wrench and die holder are mandatory!  Cheap ones break stuff or slip. 

              A sharp spiral point tap is MUCH better for cutting through threads, but will jam and break in blind holes.  A bottoming tap must have a thread started in order to work properly.  If all one has is a spiral point and bottoming tap, the threads can be started with the spiral point tap and finished with the bottoming tap if great care is exercised.

              DRAPs (combined drill and tap) work in sheet metal, but have very limited thickness ranges.  They guarantee that the hole for the thread is proper.

              Carbon steel and carbide taps can be shattered with a punch if they break, high speed steel can't.  HSS lasts a lot longer than carbon steel.  Surface treatments are probably not worth it, until the taps will be used a long time.  Generally they are  2x-4x the price of good HSS taps.

              Cheap is bad!  Solid carbide taps are not cheap, a 1/4-20 is $123, an HSS tap of similar size, style, etc. is $5-$6, a carbon steel one is about $2-$3.  The HSS tap will last many times as long as carbon steel, carbide will last many times that in abrasive material.  Don't expect good life in sand filled castings, you will break taps way too often.  Do not get a Horrible Freight set, they start out dull and seldom last.  Dull taps are NOT your friends, they will break.

              Just as a pointer, Victor Machinery Exchange is a very good vendor for machinist tools.  Their cheap tap wrenches are better than many more expensive ones.

              Anyone else with comments?

              Dave  8{)
              --

              "A word to the wise ain't necessary - it's the stupid ones that need the advice."

              Bill Cosby
            • jacot
              I plan to used front bearing from my lumina car Very heavy bearing We remove it beacause suppose to make noise but it is falt Jack 47’n 71’W On
              Message 6 of 17 , Sep 29, 2013

                 

                I plan to used front bearing  from  my lumina car

                 

                Very heavy bearing

                 

                We remove it beacause suppose to make noise  but it is falt

                 

                Jack 47’n 71’W

                 




                On 09/28/2013 08:16 PM, keith gutshall wrote:



                Hi Pat

                You might want to look at this for pillow block bearings

                 

                 

                 They have some styles of bearing the surplus center does not have.

                 

                 Keith


                Good find, expensive but useful!

                A 2" M2000 bearuing is $225.37, not cheap, but not unobtainable.

                Dave  8{)

                --

                "A word to the wise ain't necessary - it's the stupid ones that need the advice."

                Bill Cosby




              • David G. LeVine
                ... Good plan. I have used Cavalier front spindle bearings for stuff which worked out well, BUT, there MUST be a through bolt (I used 1 -8) or the races
                Message 7 of 17 , Sep 29, 2013
                  On 09/29/2013 10:13 AM, jacot wrote:

                   

                  I plan to used front bearing  from  my lumina car

                   

                  Very heavy bearing

                   

                  We remove it beacause suppose to make noise  but it is falt

                   

                  Jack 47’n 71’W



                  Good plan.  I have used Cavalier front spindle bearings for stuff which worked out well, BUT, there MUST be a through bolt (I used 1"-8) or the races separate!  Mine (new) had a bit too much clearance, but, for what I was doing, it worked well.  Expect 0.005" slop or so, SOME can be adjusted with disassembly and an oil stone.

                  Dave  8{)
                  --

                  "A word to the wise ain't necessary - it's the stupid ones that need the advice."

                  Bill Cosby
                • smiling_man_us
                  I installed that fix a few weeks ago. It was great for about two weeks. The neo was stripped from neo.groups.yahoo.com. A few days ago I clicked into yahoo
                  Message 8 of 17 , Nov 5, 2013

                     I installed that fix a few weeks ago.  It was great for about two weeks.  The "neo" was stripped from neo.groups.yahoo.com. 


                    A few days ago I clicked into yahoo groups and now I have "groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups", and I am back the NEO CRAP!  (apologies for the language)


                    I have been looking for the link for this so that I could try the install again.  Hopefully the guy that wrote the extension has re-written it to again, strip out the NEO.




                    Donald



                    ---In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, <ram50v8efi@...> wrote:

                    Dennis, sorry to see you leave but I understand. I have been dealing with the NEO problems for several months now. If by chance you are using firefox as your web browser you can install this plugin to return you to the 'Pre NEO" look in the group. Sorry, it does not fix the NEO email problems but at least the group will be as you remember.

                    here is the link, it works great, esp if you are a group moderator!

                    http://ehibbert.org.uk/extension/install.html

                    Just remember, it is for firefox only.

                    Darren M.
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