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Re: [multimachine] New machine badly needed

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  • Pat Delany
    Thank you Korbus My main experience in this sort of thing is from watching a totally unprepared American university group in Ghana. Jeremmy (very sick again)
    Message 1 of 49 , Aug 21, 2013
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      Thank you Korbus
      My main experience in this sort of thing is from watching a totally unprepared American university group in Ghana. Jeremmy (very sick again) tells me about long bus trips (on the buses you describe) just to get a simple part. This started my thoughts about a simple, very cheap lathe/mill/drill that could machine in about in a 4" cube. Riser blocks would allow it to machine aluminum in a 6" cube.

      Headstock would be pillow blocks that can be preloaded if necessary.

      A drill chuck could be held in either the lathe chuck or the tool post.

      Accuracy would be only enough to get the workpiece close enough to be finished by a file.

      Just musing...

      pat


      From: Kobus Van der Walt <kvdwalt@...>
      To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, August 21, 2013 2:37 AM
      Subject: Re: [multimachine] New machine badly needed

       
      In the US your taxi's are yellow- i see that in the movies- good for visibility and in roadworthy condition. If you take the amount of road they have in Sudan and Kenya (Kenya it is called the tarmac- got potholes as big as cars- etc) the wear is quite a bit worse than your yellow cabs. Suspension last only that long and after that it is only the prayers of the passengers that keep it on the road. 
      The most common vehicle is a Toyota hi ace minibus taxi. Land Rovers dont even last here- plenty of landy parts. But on the other hand the owners would like to keep their vehicles in a better condition. I can find a you tube clip where the overloaded ldv loose control at about 90km per hour with about 15-20 people on board..? I watched the first bit. Skipped the rest- cause i knew what was coming. Cant do much for overloading in the 3rd world. Drivers are expected to stop and take on local hitchikers cause a lot of the time that is the only way that these guys can get from point a to b in a shorter time span. And it is human to take the easiest way.

      Down here in South Africa it is a lot more civilised. The area where i work in a 10km raduis has 90% of Africa's wealth. And yet i see taxi accidents at least once a week. 15 people inside - brakes failed. The guys driving the taxi's are normally not the owners. The owners has a number of taxi's make about $2000 a day. But being good capitalist - with mafia like monopolies they try and spend as little on the vehicles as possible. Capitalism. My salary is probably in the top 5% of our continent. So i am very fortunate.

      Pat - sorry for my lecture in socio economic matters - again. Most businesses around here do roaring trade with the rest of Africa. I can get such a lathe into Zim in one phone call and a bit of persuasion. Kenya is maybe 2 emails and 2 phone calls. But that is the capitals. Then give to a engineer that have to go fix something etc. DHL does not have a branch around where Jeremy live. 

      So if it can fit in a suitcase\box that can be easily carried it can reach its destination. 

      Sorry i did not have a look at your files. Will do. Sat up last night with a banker\physicist and  aquaponics expert and chatted about black flies, anaerobic digester's for methane, woodgas, distilling alcohol and how we can use it practically. 

      Used the lathe a bit as well- First time in months - wanted to fix a nail clipper- fed up with buying new ones.
       Realised 3 things.
      • I needed needle files- 3 shops sell it in a 5km raduis.
      •  I dont use the lathe often enough. 
      • Dont forget to take the chuck key out before starting the mill- noticed in time.. 

      In conclusion. I will look at your files,  read your BoltTogetherLathe.pdf mentioned, talk less and get something useful going with your BoltTogetherLathe.pdf it. 
      regards
      Kobus


      On Wed, Aug 21, 2013 at 7:33 AM, David G. LeVine <dlevine@...> wrote:
       
      On 08/20/2013 01:46 PM, Pat wrote:
      > i've been emailing to some very nice guys who have a project in south Sudan. This is a new country that has all of 40 miles of paved roads. I learned from my experiences with Jeremmy in Kenya that you can't assume the availability of ANYTHING.
      >
      > I've decided to base the design of a take down lathe/drill/mill (will fit in airline luggage after simple disassembly)
      >
      > I based my ideas on the BoltTogetherLathe.pdf in files. I would keep the 1.5" pipe (possibly purchased in Africa) frame, use a 4" x 3/8 crs plate as the bed and make a headstock suitable for a 4" 3 or 4 jaw chuck. The cross slide would be from the concrete lathe (simplied Romig).
      >
      > It would also be very useful in small apartments.
      >
      > Wot u think?
      > Pat

      It is relatively safe to assume there is either sand or dirt. Given
      that, a fairly stiff but poorly damped headstock and tailstock can be
      quite light. Using double walled construction, filling with lead shot
      (best, buy spendy), high density foam, epoxy/granite or sand and/or dirt
      with waste motor oil will make it much more rigid and better damped.
      Filling with non-shrinking grout will make a strong, stiff structure.

      Why do it this way? Light, precise components are easier to transport.
      Imagine importing a group of tin cans, would customs think they are a
      lathe? Now fill the tin can forms with grout. Does it look different now?

      Tin can samples are generally beneath the radar of most customs agents,
      but machine tools are not. Enough "magic" to make a set of slip rolls
      and a bending brake can go a long way toward lathe forms...

      A set of Altoid tins can make the forms for flat sections, a series of
      juice cans can make the cores for bearings, etc. Even a poor area can
      make a soldering tool from a hunk of metal in a fire with a wooden
      handle carved by a machete and solder cans together.

      Dave 8{)

      --

      "A word to the wise ain't necessary - it's the stupid ones that need the
      advice."

      Bill Cosby



    • David G. LeVine
      ... Just to note, non-straight pipe, 2 lally columns and a rope loop with a stick can apply enough force to bend the pipe straight, a hydraulic jack and a U
      Message 49 of 49 , Sep 1, 2013
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        On 08/31/2013 11:08 PM, louis richardson wrote:
        i am sure any oil field pipe that is bent wll not be sent back over seas from where it came. 

        Just to note, non-straight pipe, 2 lally columns and a rope loop with a stick can apply enough force to bend the pipe straight, a hydraulic jack and a "U" frame  will work better.

        Start with a pipe and use a surface plate (monument stones work well), to find a high spot.  Apply pressure to the high spot to move it slightly beyond the final target position.  This is one of those "feel" things, after a while you will know just how much beyond the target you need to go.  It will vary depending on the pipe and phase of the moon, but you should be able to get below 0.001" run out pretty quickly.

        If you don't believe me, try it with some scrap, it works surprisingly well.

        Now, on monument stones, when granite is blanked for gravestones and government buildings, even a small flaw can make it unsaleable.  The remaining options are: *Total loss, *use it as raw scrap, *find a buyer.  If after significant work to the monument stone (gravestone, for example), the stone is to be discarded, someone who covers the cost of raw materials and labor may be very welcome.  Sometimes, a six-pack of beer on a hot day will get you a broken headstone missing a corner.

        Dave  8{)
        --

        "A word to the wise ain't necessary - it's the stupid ones that need the advice."

        Bill Cosby
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