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New machine badly needed

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  • Pat
    i ve been emailing to some very nice guys who have a project in south Sudan. This is a new country that has all of 40 miles of paved roads. I learned from my
    Message 1 of 49 , Aug 20, 2013
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      i've been emailing to some very nice guys who have a project in south Sudan. This is a new country that has all of 40 miles of paved roads. I learned from my experiences with Jeremmy in Kenya that you can't assume the availability of ANYTHING.

      I've decided to base the design of a take down lathe/drill/mill (will fit in airline luggage after simple disassembly)

      I based my ideas on the BoltTogetherLathe.pdf in files. I would keep the 1.5" pipe (possibly purchased in Africa) frame, use a 4" x 3/8 crs plate as the bed and make a headstock suitable for a 4" 3 or 4 jaw chuck. The cross slide would be from the concrete lathe (simplied Romig).

      It would also be very useful in small apartments.

      Wot u think?
      Pat
    • David G. LeVine
      ... Just to note, non-straight pipe, 2 lally columns and a rope loop with a stick can apply enough force to bend the pipe straight, a hydraulic jack and a U
      Message 49 of 49 , Sep 1, 2013
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        On 08/31/2013 11:08 PM, louis richardson wrote:
        i am sure any oil field pipe that is bent wll not be sent back over seas from where it came. 

        Just to note, non-straight pipe, 2 lally columns and a rope loop with a stick can apply enough force to bend the pipe straight, a hydraulic jack and a "U" frame  will work better.

        Start with a pipe and use a surface plate (monument stones work well), to find a high spot.  Apply pressure to the high spot to move it slightly beyond the final target position.  This is one of those "feel" things, after a while you will know just how much beyond the target you need to go.  It will vary depending on the pipe and phase of the moon, but you should be able to get below 0.001" run out pretty quickly.

        If you don't believe me, try it with some scrap, it works surprisingly well.

        Now, on monument stones, when granite is blanked for gravestones and government buildings, even a small flaw can make it unsaleable.  The remaining options are: *Total loss, *use it as raw scrap, *find a buyer.  If after significant work to the monument stone (gravestone, for example), the stone is to be discarded, someone who covers the cost of raw materials and labor may be very welcome.  Sometimes, a six-pack of beer on a hot day will get you a broken headstone missing a corner.

        Dave  8{)
        --

        "A word to the wise ain't necessary - it's the stupid ones that need the advice."

        Bill Cosby
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