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Re: [multimachine] any hobby machinist in the same area

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  • Kobus Van der Walt
    Hi Pat In our hackerspace we have a google app geographic map - so we can see the density of hackers and start up more spaces.. So this design can also be
    Message 1 of 22 , Aug 16, 2013
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      Hi  Pat
      In our hackerspace we have a google app geographic map - so we can see the density of hackers and start up more spaces.. So this design can also be used to put fellow multi machine members in contact .. Please note we use a vague approximate location.
      Unfortunately this is leveraged via google accounts- but it might work via yahoo- i can find out and put you in touch with the developer.. ?

      regards
      Kobus

      Inline image 1






      On Fri, Aug 16, 2013 at 1:01 AM, hddnj811 <hddnj811@...> wrote:
       

      looking for any hobby machinist in the same area Berea Kentucky


    • n9viw
      Kobus, any chance a noob like me could get a link? I looked in the links and attachments sections but could find nothing for a google map. Thanks! Nick
      Message 2 of 22 , Aug 16, 2013
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        Kobus, any chance a noob like me could get a link? I looked in the links and attachments sections but could find nothing for a google map. Thanks!
        Nick (Macomb, MO)

        --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Kobus Van der Walt <kvdwalt@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Pat
        > In our hackerspace we have a google app geographic map - so we can see the
        > density of hackers and start up more spaces.. So this design can also be
        > used to put fellow multi machine members in contact .. Please note we use a
        > vague approximate location.
        > Unfortunately this is leveraged via google accounts- but it might work via
        > yahoo- i can find out and put you in touch with the developer.. ?
        >
        > regards
        > Kobus
        >
        > [image: Inline image 1]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > On Fri, Aug 16, 2013 at 1:01 AM, hddnj811 <hddnj811@...> wrote:
        >
        > > **
        > >
        > >
        > > looking for any hobby machinist in the same area Berea Kentucky
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
      • Kobus Van der Walt
        Nick this is for a South African hackerspace..(i did not think anybody will take me up on this...) i am suggesting that you join a local one..
        Message 3 of 22 , Aug 17, 2013
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          Nick this is for a South African hackerspace..(i did not think anybody will take me up on this...) 
          i am suggesting that you join a local one..http://hackerspaces.org/wiki/Missouri but if you insist.. we will be starting to utilise google hangouts.. 

          Nick if you were sarcastic.. :) 

          i am a huge fan of virtual spaces- but there is nothing like making things in the real world. A while back i told the Austin hackerspace of the mulitmashine\contcrete lathe via mail. but i guess they dont read all their mail either. Or i hape they knew about it already-but unlikely. Since Texas is so small- Pat live just around the bend etc. :) For us driving 3 hours is nothing. Met a Ausie while backpacking years ago- they drive for 6 hours to a party - party and then drive back, on gravel roads, at night. Dont want to bring to much geography into this.. 

          You can build a thousand lathes in cyberspace - and none of them will be able to make anything in the real world. But if you dont know about similar minded people..

          I met a older guy a couple of months ago, Hans- that make chocolates figurines for cakes etc. Been doing that for +20 years- with 3D printing principles. That mean that he has been doing this for longer than makerbot or reprap been going. Mechanical engineer, his prevision job was building armaments in the cold war era. Very useful knowledge. Loads of them around in this area. 


          On Fri, Aug 16, 2013 at 6:14 PM, n9viw <n9viw@...> wrote:
           

          Kobus, any chance a noob like me could get a link? I looked in the links and attachments sections but could find nothing for a google map. Thanks!
          Nick (Macomb, MO)



          --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Kobus Van der Walt <kvdwalt@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Pat
          > In our hackerspace we have a google app geographic map - so we can see the
          > density of hackers and start up more spaces.. So this design can also be
          > used to put fellow multi machine members in contact .. Please note we use a
          > vague approximate location.
          > Unfortunately this is leveraged via google accounts- but it might work via
          > yahoo- i can find out and put you in touch with the developer.. ?
          >
          > regards
          > Kobus
          >
          > [image: Inline image 1]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > On Fri, Aug 16, 2013 at 1:01 AM, hddnj811 <hddnj811@...> wrote:
          >
          > > **

          > >
          > >
          > > looking for any hobby machinist in the same area Berea Kentucky
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >


        • n9viw
          Kobus, No, I was not being sarcastic! I am yet a newbie in the machine-making and machining world, but I have a great desire to learn. There were three groups
          Message 4 of 22 , Aug 17, 2013
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            Kobus,

            No, I was not being sarcastic! I am yet a newbie in the machine-making and machining world, but I have a great desire to learn. There were three groups in the Springfield, MO area (about an hour west of me) but it looks like of the three, the only one still active is SquidFoo. Their rates seem reasonable, but I would not get out there often enough to take full advantage of their facilities, as impressive as they sound. Also, I have no concept of 3d modeling or digital design.

            I think, at this point, I will have to be content to doink away at my own projects until I can create a small group of my own, people who might be a bit (or a lot) less technically or technologically minded, but who still like putting pieces together to make something. For my own purposes, I'm looking forward to bringing home a Peter Wright anvil I have on layaway at a local resale shop and refinishing that, then using it to start smithing hinges and pulls for a local cabinetmaker. I also want to make shop tools (but need the shop first), and also do a little 'Depression fab' and make a doodlebug tractor and some implements I'd like on our little homestead here. Like I said, low-tech but high fun!

            Nick

            --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Kobus Van der Walt <kvdwalt@...> wrote:
            >
            > Nick this is for a South African hackerspace..(i did not think anybody will
            > take me up on this...)
            > i am suggesting that you join a local one..
            > http://hackerspaces.org/wiki/Missouri but if you insist.. we will be
            > starting to utilise google hangouts..
            >
            > Nick if you were sarcastic.. :)
            >
            > i am a huge fan of virtual spaces- but there is nothing like making things
            > in the real world. A while back i told the Austin hackerspace of the
            > mulitmashine\contcrete lathe via mail. but i guess they dont read all their
            > mail either. Or i hape they knew about it already-but unlikely. Since Texas
            > is so small- Pat live just around the bend etc. :) For us driving 3 hours
            > is nothing. Met a Ausie while backpacking years ago- they drive for 6 hours
            > to a party - party and then drive back, on gravel roads, at night. Dont
            > want to bring to much geography into this..
            >
            > You can build a thousand lathes in cyberspace - and none of them will be
            > able to make anything in the real world. But if you dont know about similar
            > minded people..
            >
            > I met a older guy a couple of months ago, Hans- that make chocolates
            > figurines for cakes etc. Been doing that for +20 years- with 3D printing
            > principles. That mean that he has been doing this for longer than makerbot
            > or reprap been going. Mechanical engineer, his prevision job was building
            > armaments in the cold war era. Very useful knowledge. Loads of them around
            > in this area.
            >
            >
          • Pat Delany
            Don t forget to learn a little simple aluminum casting. Make strange things fit together with castings that can be turned freehand on a good wood lathe.  Pat
            Message 5 of 22 , Aug 17, 2013
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              Don't forget to learn a little simple aluminum casting. Make strange things fit together with castings that can be turned freehand on a good wood lathe. 

              Pat


              From: n9viw <n9viw@...>
              To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Saturday, August 17, 2013 10:17 PM
              Subject: [multimachine] Re: any hobby machinist in the same area

               
              Kobus,

              No, I was not being sarcastic! I am yet a newbie in the machine-making and machining world, but I have a great desire to learn. There were three groups in the Springfield, MO area (about an hour west of me) but it looks like of the three, the only one still active is SquidFoo. Their rates seem reasonable, but I would not get out there often enough to take full advantage of their facilities, as impressive as they sound. Also, I have no concept of 3d modeling or digital design.

              I think, at this point, I will have to be content to doink away at my own projects until I can create a small group of my own, people who might be a bit (or a lot) less technically or technologically minded, but who still like putting pieces together to make something. For my own purposes, I'm looking forward to bringing home a Peter Wright anvil I have on layaway at a local resale shop and refinishing that, then using it to start smithing hinges and pulls for a local cabinetmaker. I also want to make shop tools (but need the shop first), and also do a little 'Depression fab' and make a doodlebug tractor and some implements I'd like on our little homestead here. Like I said, low-tech but high fun!

              Nick

              --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Kobus Van der Walt <kvdwalt@...> wrote:
              >
              > Nick this is for a South African hackerspace..(i did not think anybody will
              > take me up on this...)
              > i am suggesting that you join a local one..
              > http://hackerspaces.org/wiki/Missouri but if you insist.. we will be
              > starting to utilise google hangouts..
              >
              > Nick if you were sarcastic.. :)
              >
              > i am a huge fan of virtual spaces- but there is nothing like making things
              > in the real world. A while back i told the Austin hackerspace of the
              > mulitmashine\contcrete lathe via mail. but i guess they dont read all their
              > mail either. Or i hape they knew about it already-but unlikely. Since Texas
              > is so small- Pat live just around the bend etc. :) For us driving 3 hours
              > is nothing. Met a Ausie while backpacking years ago- they drive for 6 hours
              > to a party - party and then drive back, on gravel roads, at night. Dont
              > want to bring to much geography into this..
              >
              > You can build a thousand lathes in cyberspace - and none of them will be
              > able to make anything in the real world. But if you dont know about similar
              > minded people..
              >
              > I met a older guy a couple of months ago, Hans- that make chocolates
              > figurines for cakes etc. Been doing that for +20 years- with 3D printing
              > principles. That mean that he has been doing this for longer than makerbot
              > or reprap been going. Mechanical engineer, his prevision job was building
              > armaments in the cold war era. Very useful knowledge. Loads of them around
              > in this area.
              >
              >



            • David G. LeVine
              ... Just as points to remember: Pure aluminum is gummy, adding copper can make it more brittle and easier to machine. Too much copper makes it so brittle and
              Message 6 of 22 , Aug 17, 2013
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                On 08/17/2013 11:27 PM, Pat Delany wrote:

                Don't forget to learn a little simple aluminum casting. Make strange things fit together with castings that can be turned freehand on a good wood lathe. 

                Pat

                Just as points to remember:

                Pure aluminum is gummy, adding copper can make it more brittle and easier to machine.  Too much copper makes it so brittle and hard it is a problem with shock loads.

                Aluminum with the right amount of copper turns pretty much like hardwood.  Gravers may be better than normal gouges for turning.

                Dave  8{)

                --

                "A word to the wise ain't necessary - it's the stupid ones that need the advice."

                Bill Cosby
              • Eggleston Lance
                Estimate % by weight of copper needed ? lance ++++
                Message 7 of 22 , Aug 17, 2013
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                  Estimate % by weight of copper needed ?

                  lance
                  ++++
                  On Aug 18, 2013, at 12:06 AM, David G. LeVine wrote:

                  Aluminum with the right amount of copper turns pretty much like hardwood. 

                • n9viw
                  Pat, As luck would have it, I DO have an old hobby wood lathe, looks to be a sort of spindle lathe. Very small headstock, probably no more than 3.5-4 swing by
                  Message 8 of 22 , Aug 18, 2013
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                    Pat,

                    As luck would have it, I DO have an old hobby wood lathe, looks to be a sort of spindle lathe. Very small headstock, probably no more than 3.5-4" swing by maybe 20" long. I don't think it even has the tool rest, but I'm pretty sure there's a dead center in the tailstock. Cast iron, pretty lightweight, but might work for small parts.

                    I do have the Gingery series, but as most of my work is in steel, I'm thinking the MM is a better match. Already have my mind spinning with the concept of making a mill/drill by mounting a x/y table with a long x run on a degree table, so I can turn it 90* to the headstock and use it as a short-table lathe rather than having the lathe out one side and the mill out the other. Just ideas for now, but we'll see how it goes!

                    Regards,
                    Nick (Macomb)

                    --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Pat Delany <rigmatch@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Don't forget to learn a little simple aluminum casting. Make strange things fit together with castings that can be turned freehand on a good wood lathe. 
                    >
                    > Pat
                    >
                    >
                    > ________________________________
                    > From: n9viw <n9viw@...>
                    > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                    > Sent: Saturday, August 17, 2013 10:17 PM
                    > Subject: [multimachine] Re: any hobby machinist in the same area
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >  
                    > Kobus,
                    >
                    > No, I was not being sarcastic! I am yet a newbie in the machine-making and machining world, but I have a great desire to learn. There were three groups in the Springfield, MO area (about an hour west of me) but it looks like of the three, the only one still active is SquidFoo. Their rates seem reasonable, but I would not get out there often enough to take full advantage of their facilities, as impressive as they sound. Also, I have no concept of 3d modeling or digital design.
                    >
                    > I think, at this point, I will have to be content to doink away at my own projects until I can create a small group of my own, people who might be a bit (or a lot) less technically or technologically minded, but who still like putting pieces together to make something. For my own purposes, I'm looking forward to bringing home a Peter Wright anvil I have on layaway at a local resale shop and refinishing that, then using it to start smithing hinges and pulls for a local cabinetmaker. I also want to make shop tools (but need the shop first), and also do a little 'Depression fab' and make a doodlebug tractor and some implements I'd like on our little homestead here. Like I said, low-tech but high fun!
                    >
                    > Nick
                    >
                    > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Kobus Van der Walt <kvdwalt@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Nick this is for a South African hackerspace..(i did not think anybody will
                    > > take me up on this...)
                    > > i am suggesting that you join a local one..
                    > > http://hackerspaces.org/wiki/Missouri but if you insist.. we will be
                    > > starting to utilise google hangouts..
                    > >
                    > > Nick if you were sarcastic.. :)
                    > >
                    > > i am a huge fan of virtual spaces- but there is nothing like making things
                    > > in the real world. A while back i told the Austin hackerspace of the
                    > > mulitmashine\contcrete lathe via mail. but i guess they dont read all their
                    > > mail either. Or i hape they knew about it already-but unlikely. Since Texas
                    > > is so small- Pat live just around the bend etc. :) For us driving 3 hours
                    > > is nothing. Met a Ausie while backpacking years ago- they drive for 6 hours
                    > > to a party - party and then drive back, on gravel roads, at night. Dont
                    > > want to bring to much geography into this..
                    > >
                    > > You can build a thousand lathes in cyberspace - and none of them will be
                    > > able to make anything in the real world. But if you dont know about similar
                    > > minded people..
                    > >
                    > > I met a older guy a couple of months ago, Hans- that make chocolates
                    > > figurines for cakes etc. Been doing that for +20 years- with 3D printing
                    > > principles. That mean that he has been doing this for longer than makerbot
                    > > or reprap been going. Mechanical engineer, his prevision job was building
                    > > armaments in the cold war era. Very useful knowledge. Loads of them around
                    > > in this area.
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                  • Pat Delany
                    Nick Don t know if your lathe is capable of turning an aluminum casting at 3000 rpm (what I have seen recommended) but I strongly agree that the crossfeed
                    Message 9 of 22 , Aug 18, 2013
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                      Nick
                      Don't know if your lathe is capable of turning an aluminum casting at 3000 rpm (what I have seen recommended) but I strongly agree that the crossfeed should be turned sideways. I have the expensive Grizzly table and have found that it causes chatter if the toolpost is not in the center. I should change it for the photos but too heavy for me to handle it now. Prices for these have gone up so much that they should not be seriously considered.

                      Pat


                      From: n9viw <n9viw@...>
                      To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Sunday, August 18, 2013 8:39 AM
                      Subject: [multimachine] Re: any hobby machinist in the same area

                       
                      Pat,

                      As luck would have it, I DO have an old hobby wood lathe, looks to be a sort of spindle lathe. Very small headstock, probably no more than 3.5-4" swing by maybe 20" long. I don't think it even has the tool rest, but I'm pretty sure there's a dead center in the tailstock. Cast iron, pretty lightweight, but might work for small parts.

                      I do have the Gingery series, but as most of my work is in steel, I'm thinking the MM is a better match. Already have my mind spinning with the concept of making a mill/drill by mounting a x/y table with a long x run on a degree table, so I can turn it 90* to the headstock and use it as a short-table lathe rather than having the lathe out one side and the mill out the other. Just ideas for now, but we'll see how it goes!

                      Regards,
                      Nick (Macomb)

                      --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Pat Delany <rigmatch@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Don't forget to learn a little simple aluminum casting. Make strange things fit together with castings that can be turned freehand on a good wood lathe. 
                      >
                      > Pat
                      >
                      >
                      > ________________________________
                      > From: n9viw <n9viw@...>
                      > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                      > Sent: Saturday, August 17, 2013 10:17 PM
                      > Subject: [multimachine] Re: any hobby machinist in the same area
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >  
                      > Kobus,
                      >
                      > No, I was not being sarcastic! I am yet a newbie in the machine-making and machining world, but I have a great desire to learn. There were three groups in the Springfield, MO area (about an hour west of me) but it looks like of the three, the only one still active is SquidFoo. Their rates seem reasonable, but I would not get out there often enough to take full advantage of their facilities, as impressive as they sound. Also, I have no concept of 3d modeling or digital design.
                      >
                      > I think, at this point, I will have to be content to doink away at my own projects until I can create a small group of my own, people who might be a bit (or a lot) less technically or technologically minded, but who still like putting pieces together to make something. For my own purposes, I'm looking forward to bringing home a Peter Wright anvil I have on layaway at a local resale shop and refinishing that, then using it to start smithing hinges and pulls for a local cabinetmaker. I also want to make shop tools (but need the shop first), and also do a little 'Depression fab' and make a doodlebug tractor and some implements I'd like on our little homestead here. Like I said, low-tech but high fun!
                      >
                      > Nick
                      >
                      > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Kobus Van der Walt <kvdwalt@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Nick this is for a South African hackerspace..(i did not think anybody will
                      > > take me up on this...)
                      > > i am suggesting that you join a local one..
                      > > http://hackerspaces.org/wiki/Missouri but if you insist.. we will be
                      > > starting to utilise google hangouts..
                      > >
                      > > Nick if you were sarcastic.. :)
                      > >
                      > > i am a huge fan of virtual spaces- but there is nothing like making things
                      > > in the real world. A while back i told the Austin hackerspace of the
                      > > mulitmashine\contcrete lathe via mail. but i guess they dont read all their
                      > > mail either. Or i hape they knew about it already-but unlikely. Since Texas
                      > > is so small- Pat live just around the bend etc. :) For us driving 3 hours
                      > > is nothing. Met a Ausie while backpacking years ago- they drive for 6 hours
                      > > to a party - party and then drive back, on gravel roads, at night. Dont
                      > > want to bring to much geography into this..
                      > >
                      > > You can build a thousand lathes in cyberspace - and none of them will be
                      > > able to make anything in the real world. But if you dont know about similar
                      > > minded people..
                      > >
                      > > I met a older guy a couple of months ago, Hans- that make chocolates
                      > > figurines for cakes etc. Been doing that for +20 years- with 3D printing
                      > > principles. That mean that he has been doing this for longer than makerbot
                      > > or reprap been going. Mechanical engineer, his prevision job was building
                      > > armaments in the cold war era. Very useful knowledge. Loads of them around
                      > > in this area.
                      > >
                      > >
                      >



                    • Eggleston Lance
                      Pat, Aluminum 6061can be cleanly cut below 1000 rpm. It takes a sharp HSS cutter, being right on center and use kerosene or WD-40 as the lube.
                      Message 10 of 22 , Aug 18, 2013
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                        Pat,

                        Aluminum 6061can be cleanly cut below 1000 rpm.
                        It takes a sharp HSS <not carbide> cutter, 
                        being right on center 
                        and use kerosene or WD-40 as the lube.

                        Other have had great success with the diamond
                        shear cutting bit, I have not tried one.

                        Aluminum 1xxx series is too gummy to be cleanly machined
                        and too soft to be used for machine parts.

                        lance
                        ++++
                        On Aug 18, 2013, at 12:05 PM, Pat Delany wrote:


                        Don't know if your lathe is capable of turning an aluminum casting at 3000 rpm (what I have seen recommended) 

                      • Kobus Van der Walt
                        apologies Nick - my dayjob is in IT and there is constant bickering teasing etc - but in a good way. I was looking for years for a hackerspace to join- did not
                        Message 11 of 22 , Aug 18, 2013
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                          apologies Nick - my dayjob is in IT and there is constant bickering\teasing etc - but in a good way. I was looking for years for a hackerspace to join- did not even know what it was called. Browsed around and looking for a way to measure electrical usage of my fridge- ended up at a hackerspace. 

                          In our space all the use of the tools are free.. we meetup on Tuesdays evenings and Saturdays. We get funding from local tech business(250sqm).. I think in the US hackerspace will really help your economy. 
                          we have a saying down here- translated it mean a farmer will make a plan. i plan to muck about with some woodgas - for heat to soften metal so i can hit it with a hammer. Ran into the local distillers, plan to make some ethanol. Eventually all my interest should come together. i hope. 
                          One of the guys i know are into aquaponics- 
                          But keep in touch Nick- good luck. What i love about these groups is the supportive environment. Together we can make the world a better place and more interesting.  :)


                          On Sun, Aug 18, 2013 at 5:17 AM, n9viw <n9viw@...> wrote:
                           

                          Kobus,

                          No, I was not being sarcastic! I am yet a newbie in the machine-making and machining world, but I have a great desire to learn. There were three groups in the Springfield, MO area (about an hour west of me) but it looks like of the three, the only one still active is SquidFoo. Their rates seem reasonable, but I would not get out there often enough to take full advantage of their facilities, as impressive as they sound. Also, I have no concept of 3d modeling or digital design.

                          I think, at this point, I will have to be content to doink away at my own projects until I can create a small group of my own, people who might be a bit (or a lot) less technically or technologically minded, but who still like putting pieces together to make something. For my own purposes, I'm looking forward to bringing home a Peter Wright anvil I have on layaway at a local resale shop and refinishing that, then using it to start smithing hinges and pulls for a local cabinetmaker. I also want to make shop tools (but need the shop first), and also do a little 'Depression fab' and make a doodlebug tractor and some implements I'd like on our little homestead here. Like I said, low-tech but high fun!

                          Nick



                          --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Kobus Van der Walt <kvdwalt@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Nick this is for a South African hackerspace..(i did not think anybody will
                          > take me up on this...)
                          > i am suggesting that you join a local one..
                          > http://hackerspaces.org/wiki/Missouri but if you insist.. we will be
                          > starting to utilise google hangouts..
                          >
                          > Nick if you were sarcastic.. :)
                          >
                          > i am a huge fan of virtual spaces- but there is nothing like making things
                          > in the real world. A while back i told the Austin hackerspace of the
                          > mulitmashine\contcrete lathe via mail. but i guess they dont read all their
                          > mail either. Or i hape they knew about it already-but unlikely. Since Texas
                          > is so small- Pat live just around the bend etc. :) For us driving 3 hours
                          > is nothing. Met a Ausie while backpacking years ago- they drive for 6 hours
                          > to a party - party and then drive back, on gravel roads, at night. Dont
                          > want to bring to much geography into this..
                          >
                          > You can build a thousand lathes in cyberspace - and none of them will be
                          > able to make anything in the real world. But if you dont know about similar
                          > minded people..
                          >
                          > I met a older guy a couple of months ago, Hans- that make chocolates
                          > figurines for cakes etc. Been doing that for +20 years- with 3D printing
                          > principles. That mean that he has been doing this for longer than makerbot
                          > or reprap been going. Mechanical engineer, his prevision job was building
                          > armaments in the cold war era. Very useful knowledge. Loads of them around
                          > in this area.
                          >
                          >


                        • David G. LeVine
                          ... Unless you start with a known, pure aluminum alloy, it is difficult to say since other alloying components will come out and bite you. I would guess below
                          Message 12 of 22 , Aug 18, 2013
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                            On 08/18/2013 12:31 AM, Eggleston Lance wrote:
                            Estimate % by weight of copper needed ?

                            lance
                            ++++
                            On Aug 18, 2013, at 12:06 AM, David G. LeVine wrote:

                            Aluminum with the right amount of copper turns pretty much like hardwood.

                            Unless you start with a known, pure aluminum alloy, it is difficult to say since other alloying components will come out and bite you.

                            I would guess below 5% by weight, I would start with 1% and move as it seems to need it.  But with other than pure (1000 series alloy), it is a guess, but add too little and it is easy to add more.  Some of the zinc alloys (7000 series, I believe) can get VERY hard and strong, almost like steel.

                            Dave  8{)
                            --

                            "A word to the wise ain't necessary - it's the stupid ones that need the advice."

                            Bill Cosby
                          • David G. LeVine
                            ... Nick, Beware! If you make a lathe/boring machine with tools coming out of both sides of the spindle, some will run backwards and you can not safely use
                            Message 13 of 22 , Aug 18, 2013
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                              On 08/18/2013 09:39 AM, n9viw wrote:
                              > I do have the Gingery series, but as most of my work is in steel, I'm thinking the MM is a better match. Already have my mind spinning with the concept of making a mill/drill by mounting a x/y table with a long x run on a degree table, so I can turn it 90* to the headstock and use it as a short-table lathe rather than having the lathe out one side and the mill out the other. Just ideas for now, but we'll see how it goes!
                              >
                              > Regards,
                              > Nick (Macomb)

                              Nick,

                              Beware! If you make a lathe/boring machine with tools coming out of
                              both sides of the spindle, some will run backwards and you can not
                              safely use threaded chucks under those conditions as they will spin off
                              at the worst times.

                              Dave 8{)

                              --

                              "A word to the wise ain't necessary - it's the stupid ones that need the
                              advice."

                              Bill Cosby
                            • Eggleston Lance
                              I have many extruded aluminum muffins . I believe lawn chairs and window frames are 1000 series? I have heard the pennies are good for alloying with aluminum
                              Message 14 of 22 , Aug 18, 2013
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                                I have many extruded aluminum "muffins".
                                I believe lawn chairs and window frames are 1000 series?

                                I have heard the pennies are good for alloying with aluminum
                                for the copper and the zinc they contain.
                                5% by weight max?

                                lance
                                ++++


                                On Aug 18, 2013, at 6:50 PM, David G. LeVine wrote:

                                Estimate % by weight of copper needed ?

                                lance
                                ++++
                                On Aug 18, 2013, at 12:06 AM, David G. LeVine wrote:

                                Aluminum with the right amount of copper turns pretty much like hardwood.

                                Unless you start with a known, pure aluminum alloy, it is difficult to say since other alloying components will come out and bite you.

                                I would guess below 5% by weight, I would start with 1% and move as it seems to need it.  But with other than pure (1000 series alloy), it is a guess, but add too little and it is easy to add more.  Some of the zinc alloys (7000 series, I believe) can get VERY hard and strong, almost like steel.

                                Dave  8{)

                              • David G. LeVine
                                ... I would start lower (as in 1% by weight) and see how it machines. Remember, since it is easily remelted, it is no big loss if it needs more (or less) if
                                Message 15 of 22 , Aug 18, 2013
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                                  On 08/18/2013 07:04 PM, Eggleston Lance wrote:

                                  I have many extruded aluminum "muffins".
                                  I believe lawn chairs and window frames are 1000 series?

                                  I have heard the pennies are good for alloying with aluminum
                                  for the copper and the zinc they contain.
                                  5% by weight max?

                                  lance
                                  ++++

                                  I would start lower (as in 1% by weight) and see how it machines.  Remember, since it is easily remelted, it is no big loss if it needs more (or less) if you use a small piece.  New pennies are biased toward zinc, nd zinc hardens aluminum alloys a whole bunch.  No, I can't tell you how much you will need.  Also beware of zinc fumes.  Look up Zinc Fume Fever,it can kill you.  Anecdotal evidence indicates that milk is antidotal, it is less damaging than  trip to the ER.  See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metal_fume_fever for one write-up.

                                  Dave  8{)
                                  --

                                  "A word to the wise ain't necessary - it's the stupid ones that need the advice."

                                  Bill Cosby
                                • n9viw
                                  Dave, Good point, thanks for the heads-up. I think I was thinking of having an AC motor with digital drive for speed control and reversability, and never
                                  Message 16 of 22 , Aug 19, 2013
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                                    Dave,

                                    Good point, thanks for the heads-up. I think I was thinking of having an AC motor with digital drive for speed control and reversability, and never considered faceplate threading! D'oh.

                                    Another idea I have is making what is essentially a copy of this:
                                    http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA=890-8924&PMPXNO=3527541&PARTPG=INLMK3
                                    by just kitbashing a homemade lathe and a drill press together. Would it work? Maybe. Badly, most like, but in the immortal words of young Froederick Frahnkenstein, "IT.... COULD... WORK!!!" And be a bloody load cheaper than two grand!

                                    Nick

                                    --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "David G. LeVine" <dlevine@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > On 08/18/2013 09:39 AM, n9viw wrote:
                                    > > I do have the Gingery series, but as most of my work is in steel, I'm thinking the MM is a better match. Already have my mind spinning with the concept of making a mill/drill by mounting a x/y table with a long x run on a degree table, so I can turn it 90* to the headstock and use it as a short-table lathe rather than having the lathe out one side and the mill out the other. Just ideas for now, but we'll see how it goes!
                                    > >
                                    > > Regards,
                                    > > Nick (Macomb)
                                    >
                                    > Nick,
                                    >
                                    > Beware! If you make a lathe/boring machine with tools coming out of
                                    > both sides of the spindle, some will run backwards and you can not
                                    > safely use threaded chucks under those conditions as they will spin off
                                    > at the worst times.
                                    >
                                    > Dave 8{)
                                    >
                                    > --
                                    >
                                    > "A word to the wise ain't necessary - it's the stupid ones that need the
                                    > advice."
                                    >
                                    > Bill Cosby
                                    >
                                  • Eggleston Lance
                                    Mount the drill press on a roller slide or ways behind the lathe. That way you can move and lock it in place over the lathe bed in different spots. I was going
                                    Message 17 of 22 , Aug 19, 2013
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                                      Mount the drill press on a roller slide or ways behind the lathe.
                                      That way you can move and lock it in place over the lathe bed 
                                      in different spots.

                                      I was going to do this with a small HF drill press
                                      behind an Atlas 12" lathe, but I sold the lathe.

                                      I may do it with the 11" I am building now.
                                      Still have the HF DP, but modified it for light milling work.

                                      lance
                                      ++++
                                      On Aug 19, 2013, at 10:03 PM, n9viw wrote:

                                      Another idea I have is making what is essentially a copy of this: 
                                      http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA=890-8924&PMPXNO=3527541&PARTPG=INLMK3
                                      by just kitbashing a homemade lathe and a drill press together.

                                    • David G. LeVine
                                      ... This is only an issue if you use a threaded mount. Taper mounts (where the thread carries no torque) and cam lock mounts (where there is no thread) are
                                      Message 18 of 22 , Aug 19, 2013
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                                        On 08/19/2013 10:03 PM, n9viw wrote:
                                        > Dave,
                                        >
                                        > Good point, thanks for the heads-up. I think I was thinking of having an AC motor with digital drive for speed control and reversability, and never considered faceplate threading! D'oh.
                                        >
                                        > Another idea I have is making what is essentially a copy of this:
                                        > http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA=890-8924&PMPXNO=3527541&PARTPG=INLMK3
                                        > by just kitbashing a homemade lathe and a drill press together. Would it work? Maybe. Badly, most like, but in the immortal words of young Froederick Frahnkenstein, "IT.... COULD... WORK!!!" And be a bloody load cheaper than two grand!
                                        >
                                        > Nick

                                        This is only an issue if you use a threaded mount. Taper mounts (where
                                        the thread carries no torque) and cam lock mounts (where there is no
                                        thread) are different, they don't loosen.

                                        Dave 8{)

                                        --

                                        "A word to the wise ain't necessary - it's the stupid ones that need the
                                        advice."

                                        Bill Cosby
                                      • Shannon DeWolfe
                                        Nick, See this man s site: http://home.iprimus.com.au/stevor/Toolworks.htm Scroll down to the Machinery & Tooling section. The first listing links to his
                                        Message 19 of 22 , Aug 20, 2013
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                                          Nick,

                                          See this man's site:

                                          http://home.iprimus.com.au/stevor/Toolworks.htm

                                          Scroll down to the "Machinery & Tooling" section. The first listing
                                          links to his solution for a light milling machine made by marrying a
                                          lathe and drill press.

                                          I don't know Steve. But I really admire his work. Be sure to check out
                                          his other pages too.

                                          Regards,

                                          Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
                                          --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 57 year old fat man.

                                          On 8/19/2013 9:03 PM, n9viw wrote:
                                          > Another idea I have is making what is essentially a copy of this:
                                          > http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA=890-8924&PMPXNO=3527541&PARTPG=INLMK3
                                          > by just kitbashing a homemade lathe and a drill press together. Would
                                          > it work? Maybe. Badly, most like, but in the immortal words of young
                                          > Froederick Frahnkenstein, "IT.... COULD... WORK!!!" And be a bloody
                                          > load cheaper than two grand!
                                        • David G. LeVine
                                          ... Shannon, note the last thing he says, The Jacobs taper chuck keeps falling off. Jacobs tapers (and Morse tapers without a drawbar) are dangerous for
                                          Message 20 of 22 , Aug 20, 2013
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                                            On 08/20/2013 05:48 AM, Shannon DeWolfe wrote:
                                            > See this man's site:
                                            >
                                            > http://home.iprimus.com.au/stevor/Toolworks.htm
                                            >
                                            > Scroll down to the "Machinery & Tooling" section. The first listing
                                            > links to his solution for a light milling machine made by marrying a
                                            > lathe and drill press.

                                            Shannon, note the last thing he says, "The Jacobs taper chuck keeps
                                            falling off." Jacobs tapers (and Morse tapers without a drawbar) are
                                            dangerous for milling, they are not designed to take the side loads. A
                                            slight hitch and the mill comes flying at your face.

                                            Dave 8{)

                                            --

                                            "A word to the wise ain't necessary - it's the stupid ones that need the
                                            advice."

                                            Bill Cosby
                                          • Shannon DeWolfe
                                            But, that was the reason for the statement in front of it: Thread mount Jacobs drill chuck Regards, Mr. Shannon DeWolfe --I ve taken to using Mr. because my
                                            Message 21 of 22 , Aug 20, 2013
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                                              But, that was the reason for the statement in front of it:
                                              "Thread mount Jacobs drill chuck"

                                              Regards,

                                              Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
                                              --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 57 year old fat man.

                                              On 8/20/2013 12:57 PM, David G. LeVine wrote:
                                              >
                                              >
                                              > Shannon, note the last thing he says, "The Jacobs taper chuck keeps
                                              > falling off." Jacobs tapers (and Morse tapers without a drawbar) are
                                              > dangerous for milling, they are not designed to take the side loads. A
                                              > slight hitch and the mill comes flying at your face.
                                              >
                                              > Dave 8{)
                                              >
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