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Re: [multimachine] New spindle drawing needed/car expert needed

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  • Pat Delany
    Exactly!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I divide the world (in my mind) into mechanical and non-mechanical people. For me, the ideal situation is that of a
    Message 1 of 52 , Aug 1, 2013
      Exactly!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
      I divide the world (in my mind) into mechanical and non-mechanical people. For me, the ideal situation is that of a mechanical guy sitting next to a pile of scrap and imagining how to make an accurate and useful machine from it. The new website will have over 4 gig of support materials to help the guy choose.

      I know that dimensions are necessary for drawing components but they might be of little use to experienced machine builders who have to build from scrap.

      I love cheap things that work well enough to do the job. This is especially true with things like roller bearings.

      Pat



      From: kbs2244 <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
      To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, August 1, 2013 11:25 AM
      Subject: [multimachine] New spindle drawing needed/car expert needed

       
      I do not think the request for a make and model spindle common in the third world can be answered from a stateside perspective.

      There are many cars common around the world that have never been marketed in the US.
      Thus someone in the US would have no knowledge of them.

      Toyota, Honda and Mercedes seem to be everywhere though.
      The big stuff seems to be Mercedes or something Russian.

      I do think the plans should allow enough flexibility for local ingenuity and application.
      If you make them too specific, someone may think that the part mentioned is the only one that will work for some reason.



    • Pat Delany
      I agree also! Homebuilt tools are for those who have no money but do have access to scrap. Other people should look for used tools but should realize that
      Message 52 of 52 , Aug 8, 2013
        I agree also!
        Homebuilt tools are for those who have no money but do have access to scrap. Other people should look for used tools but should realize that totally accurate rebuilds are very difficult.
        Don't let rust scare you off unless the machine was totally worn out before it was put out to pasture.

        Pat


        From: David Lee <dsleei@...>
        To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, August 8, 2013 2:15 PM
        Subject: RE: [multimachine] Basic functioning mill/drill

         
        Excellent advice.
         
        DSLee
         
        From: multimachine@yahoogroups.com [mailto:multimachine@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Eggleston Lance
        Sent: Thursday, August 08, 2013 1:43 PM
        To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [multimachine] Basic functioning mill/drill
        Both options have pros and cons,
        much of the success will depend on the details.
        IMO:
         
        1- buy an old american cast iron 9 or 10" lathe
        and rebuild it. Works great, but not for slotting, 
        even with the "milling" attachment. Est cost $500-900
        < forget the HF lathe, poor quality for more than 
        model maker sized projects>.
         
        2- Buy an old american made cast iron horizontal mill and
        rebuild it. Est $500-700. Works great for slotting and drilling, 
        lathe work is very limited in size due to the table size / movement.
         
        3- Buy one of each. Est $1000. Excellent idea. Con[ space needed.
         
        4a- Build a smaller scale multimachine using a motorcycle or lawnmower
        engine. Est $200-500 depended on your "junkpile". 
        Pro, cheaper, make it to the size you need / have.
        Con: time to build, may not look "pretty".
         
        4b- look in the photo files for the home-built mill project.
                    Uses a concrete frame and head. Smallish.
         
        5- Build a multi axis lathe ala the  Concrete lathe with an
        overhead arm for the 3rd axis. Con: more complicated build,
        more $$, more space.
        Pro: more versatile, more flexible use, greater "cool" factor.
         
        lance
        +++++
        On Aug 8, 2013, at 12:07 PM, Alan Nauman wrote:


        Should I just purchase a lower cost s mall drill/mill/lathe and fight the size limits that come with it or is it reasonable for me to build a Multimachine that would perform limited functions that are not super accurate at a low cost?
         


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