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RE: [multimachine] Re: New spindle drawing needed/car expert needed

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  • David Lee
    Alan, I thought our objective was to provide documentation of metal working machines that can be made by third-world craftsmen from readily available and
    Message 1 of 52 , Jul 31, 2013

      Alan,

       

      I thought our objective was to provide documentation of metal working machines that can be made by third-world craftsmen from readily available and inexpensive components.  That is why I asked Pat to tell me the most typical make, model and year of an automotive spindle that could be found in third-world junk years.  I wouldn’t really classify a Deuce and a half or Peterbuilt tractors as ‘readily available and inexpensive’ or have I misunderstood our prime directive?

       

      DSLee

       

      From: multimachine@yahoogroups.com [mailto:multimachine@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Alan Nauman
      Sent: Wednesday, July 31, 2013 12:24 PM
      To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [multimachine] Re: New spindle drawing needed/car expert needed


      I know the military "deuce and a half" uses Rockwell axles.  I googled that and found the timkin bearing model.  From that, I searched Ebay and was referred to some Timkin 567 and 563 bearings and races that are 2.875" bore and 5" outside diameter. 

      Just keep following a search like that and you will probably be able to find bearings as big or small as you would like.  These say they fit some Peterbuilts.  Search on Peterbuilt roller bearing and you will probably find some common larger bearings.

      Alan


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: David G. LeVine <dlevine@...>
      To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wed, 31 Jul 2013 02:14:44 -0400 (EDT)
      Subject: Re: [multimachine] Re: New spindle drawing needed/car expert needed

       

      On 07/30/2013 04:52 PM, Pat Delany wrote:
      > wish i knew to figure out what sizes of bearings are used for the rear
      > wheels of front wheel drive cars

      Ask and ye shall receive! Go to ANY good auto parts store and give them
      the make and model and they will tell you, or online, RockAuto seems to
      have a good GUI to make it easy.

      Unfortunately, I haven't found a really "big rig" version yet.

      Dave 8{)

    • Pat Delany
      I agree also! Homebuilt tools are for those who have no money but do have access to scrap. Other people should look for used tools but should realize that
      Message 52 of 52 , Aug 8, 2013
        I agree also!
        Homebuilt tools are for those who have no money but do have access to scrap. Other people should look for used tools but should realize that totally accurate rebuilds are very difficult.
        Don't let rust scare you off unless the machine was totally worn out before it was put out to pasture.

        Pat


        From: David Lee <dsleei@...>
        To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, August 8, 2013 2:15 PM
        Subject: RE: [multimachine] Basic functioning mill/drill

         
        Excellent advice.
         
        DSLee
         
        From: multimachine@yahoogroups.com [mailto:multimachine@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Eggleston Lance
        Sent: Thursday, August 08, 2013 1:43 PM
        To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [multimachine] Basic functioning mill/drill
        Both options have pros and cons,
        much of the success will depend on the details.
        IMO:
         
        1- buy an old american cast iron 9 or 10" lathe
        and rebuild it. Works great, but not for slotting, 
        even with the "milling" attachment. Est cost $500-900
        < forget the HF lathe, poor quality for more than 
        model maker sized projects>.
         
        2- Buy an old american made cast iron horizontal mill and
        rebuild it. Est $500-700. Works great for slotting and drilling, 
        lathe work is very limited in size due to the table size / movement.
         
        3- Buy one of each. Est $1000. Excellent idea. Con[ space needed.
         
        4a- Build a smaller scale multimachine using a motorcycle or lawnmower
        engine. Est $200-500 depended on your "junkpile". 
        Pro, cheaper, make it to the size you need / have.
        Con: time to build, may not look "pretty".
         
        4b- look in the photo files for the home-built mill project.
                    Uses a concrete frame and head. Smallish.
         
        5- Build a multi axis lathe ala the  Concrete lathe with an
        overhead arm for the 3rd axis. Con: more complicated build,
        more $$, more space.
        Pro: more versatile, more flexible use, greater "cool" factor.
         
        lance
        +++++
        On Aug 8, 2013, at 12:07 PM, Alan Nauman wrote:


        Should I just purchase a lower cost s mall drill/mill/lathe and fight the size limits that come with it or is it reasonable for me to build a Multimachine that would perform limited functions that are not super accurate at a low cost?
         


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