Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Drill Rod 1.25 inch Re: [multimachine] Building a lathe/IMPT

Expand Messages
  • Gordon Haag
    From that article, Low-carbon steels typically do not require normalizing. I believe CRS is low carbon steel. I think that normalizing the ways would only
    Message 1 of 36 , Jun 11, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      From that article, "Low-carbon steels typically do not require normalizing." I believe CRS is low carbon steel.

      I think that normalizing the ways would only introduce a potential for mistakes such as uneven heating and uneven cooling. There is no point in risking handling something that has to be accurate while it is in such a soft state. The article discusses the use of vacuum furnaces. This implies that correctly done normalizing for acceptable results requires something more sophisticated than a pile of charcoal and a mud pit.

      CRS should serve fine for ways, especially if it is not machined unevenly. Why risk ruining the only two straight pieces of steel in the village when a 0.001 stress in the ways is the least of your worries?

      I have been thinking of doing some experiments on this, I have to order a small surface plate.

      Gordon


      On Tue, Jun 11, 2013 at 10:53 PM, Chris Tofu <rampaginggreenhulk@...> wrote:
       



      Dave not to be contentious but performing either is done more or less the same way. Maybe the difference ultimately lies in how much heat, how fast?
      A guy once told me to put crs in a crock pot for, iirC, an hour or more. Maybe he was joking. But in any event is.there a way to carefully normalize crs w/o altering the metal (except of course to take warp out of it)?

      ------------------------------


      On Tue, Jun 11, 2013 10:01 PM PDT David G. LeVine wrote:

      >Actually, I believe the term you want is normalize, not anneal. See http://vacaero.com/Vacuum-Heat-Treating-with-Dan-Herring/Vacuum-Heat-Treating-with-Dan-Herring/the-importance-of-normalizing.html for one discussion.


    • Pat
      Thanks Bill I think that is the best place to start. Pat
      Message 36 of 36 , Jun 13, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Thanks Bill
        I think that is the best place to start.

        Pat

        --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, William Palmer <bill.apalmer@...> wrote:
        >
        > A question please. In the interest of salvage items, would a ram from a
        > hydraulic piston work?
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.