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Re: Newbie asks dumb question about using a small engine as a lathe headstock

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  • oldhermit
    If I remember there was an article around 1963 on how to make 2 bench top saber saws. The stroke from one was provided by a small engine and the other by a
    Message 1 of 11 , May 19, 2013
      If I remember there was an article around 1963 on how to make 2 bench top saber saws. The stroke from one was provided by a small engine and the other by a refrigeration compressor.

      --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "David G. LeVine" <dlevine@...> wrote:
      >
      > On 05/18/2013 10:16 AM, Tim wrote:
      > > Hi Gregg,
      > > I'm just a tinkerer always working against the obstacle of little or no money. I had a similar idea only I was going to use the engine as the business end of a drill press. Also thought of taking the head off and letting the piston drive a power hacksaw.
      > > Tim
      >
      > Tim,
      >
      > Using the piston to drive a power hacksaw is similar to the old PM
      > filing machine from a refrigerator compressor. Best practice on a power
      > hacksaw is to remove the blade from the work during the back stroke.
      > The piston won't do that. What it WILL do is quickly cut the workpiece
      > and the blade will dull SLIGHTLY more quickly than if it was removed
      > from the work.
      >
      > On the plus side, it will work pretty well and be quite simple to do
      > with a decent stroke length. You will need to get a slow enough drive
      > to prevent overheating the blade and work, but that is pretty simple.
      > All in all, it sounds like a plan, but how will you lubricate the main
      > bearings at such low speed?
      >
      > Dave 8{)
      >
      > --
      >
      > "A word to the wise ain't necessary - it's the stupid ones that need the
      > advice."
      >
      > Bill Cosby
      >
    • john baird
      Hi, leave the engine complete, start it up, and use it as a self powered headstock. regards jb
      Message 2 of 11 , May 19, 2013
        Hi, leave the engine complete, start it up, and use it as a self powered headstock.
        regards jb

        --- On Sun, 19/5/13, oldhermit <orwhut@...> wrote:

        > From: oldhermit <orwhut@...>
        > Subject: [multimachine] Re: Newbie asks dumb question about using a small engine as a lathe headstock
        > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Sunday, 19 May, 2013, 14:54
        > If I remember there was an article
        > around 1963 on how to make 2 bench top saber saws.  The
        > stroke from one was provided by a small engine and the other
        > by a refrigeration compressor.
        >
        > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com,
        > "David G. LeVine" <dlevine@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > On 05/18/2013 10:16 AM, Tim wrote:
        > > > Hi Gregg,
        > > > I'm just a tinkerer always working against the
        > obstacle of little or no money. I had a similar idea only I
        > was going to use the engine as the business end of a drill
        > press. Also thought of taking the head off and letting the
        > piston drive a power hacksaw.
        > > > Tim
        > >
        > > Tim,
        > >
        > > Using the piston to drive a power hacksaw is similar to
        > the old PM
        > > filing machine from a refrigerator compressor. 
        > Best practice on a power
        > > hacksaw is to remove the blade from the work during the
        > back stroke. 
        > > The piston won't do that.  What it WILL do is
        > quickly cut the workpiece
        > > and the blade will dull SLIGHTLY more quickly than if
        > it was removed
        > > from the work.
        > >
        > > On the plus side, it will work pretty well and be quite
        > simple to do
        > > with a decent stroke length.  You will need to get
        > a slow enough drive
        > > to prevent overheating the blade and work, but that is
        > pretty simple. 
        > > All in all, it sounds like a plan, but how will you
        > lubricate the main
        > > bearings at such low speed?
        > >
        > > Dave  8{)
        > >
        > > --
        > >
        > > "A word to the wise ain't necessary - it's the stupid
        > ones that need the
        > > advice."
        > >
        > > Bill Cosby
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > -------------
        > We have a sister site for files and pictures dedicated to
        > concrete machine framed machine tools. You will find a great
        > deal of information about concrete based machines and the
        > inventor of the concrete frame lathe, Lucian Ingraham
        > Yeomans. Go to http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Multimachine-Concrete-Machine-Tools/
        >
        > Also visit the Joseph V. Romig group for even more concrete
        > tool construction, shop notes, stories, and wisdom from the
        > early 20th Century.
        > http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/romig_designs/
        > -------------Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >     multimachine-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com
        >
        >
      • Bungee
        Hello all. I am glad I posted here. The engine is a vertical shaft and would need to be mounted on its side on a frame. I never èven considered lubrication
        Message 3 of 11 , May 19, 2013
          Hello all.

          I am glad I posted here. The engine is a vertical shaft and would need to be mounted on its side on a frame. I never èven considered lubrication and just assumed it would work by splash like a horizontal. Need to put some more thought into that.

          I am reading on the concrete lathe and it is sounding really fun. And there is a bonus of getting a very useful tool at the end.

          The engine lathe idea is basically to complete some wood projects I have and to start a better lathe. I work for the US gov and have allot of furlough days coming before the end of the year. Need a project to occupy the time that won't get too expensive.

          Thanks for all the ideas,

          G
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