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Emailing: Rough Threading Pages from spray booklet.pdf

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  • Dr. Alexis O'Neill
    Good morning, Here is a spec sheet that we follow to prepare substrates for spraying. Hope it helps give a clearer idea of what we need to do. We do this with
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 23, 2013
    Good morning, Here is a spec sheet that we follow to prepare substrates for spraying. Hope it helps give a clearer idea of what we need to do.

    We do this with small pieces now, but the large jobs are beyond anyone within a very long driving distance.

    Alexis

    Enviado desde mi oficina móvil BlackBerry® de Telcel
  • David G. LeVine
    ... I hope this does not hurt the translator too much . Multi-start threading has more than one thread on the same workpiece which starts at a different
    Message 2 of 3 , Jan 23, 2013
      On 01/23/2013 11:10 AM, Dr. Alexis O'Neill wrote:
      <*>[Attachment(s) from Dr. Alexis O&#39;Neill included below]
      
      Good morning, Here is a spec sheet that we follow to prepare substrates for spraying. Hope it helps give a clearer idea of what we need to do.
      
      We do this with small pieces now, but the large jobs are beyond anyone within a very long driving distance. 
      
      Alexis

      I hope this does not hurt the translator too much <GRIN>.

      Multi-start threading has more than one thread on the same workpiece which starts at a different rotation.  For example, a two start thread might start at 0° and at 180°  With a canted wheel cut to a specific profile, one can make multiple start threads with many starts, let's say 20 TPI and 20 starts with a 1" feed rate.

      Let's assume a simple thread which can be made at 1-2 RPM (remember, this is the HUGE workpiece.)  at 20 turns per inch and 1 RPM, you get 20 minutes per inch.  Given that 10 meters is 390 inches, it will take 130 HOURS to cut the thread.  Do the math yourself.

      Now, same machine, but multiple start threads and a 1" feed.  That means 1 minute per inch or 6.5 hours to thread 10 meters, half that if the threads start with two grinders.Take a wheel with annular grooves (around the rim), cant it at the correct angle and feed it at 1"/rev.  It will take some head scratching, but I think it might help you see both the advantages and desirability.  Alternatively, a very coarse wheel will leave deep scratches which MIGHT be sufficient.  Look at a surface ground with an angle grinder with a 36 grit disk.  Of course, the disk would need to be fresh or the scratches

      My GUESS would be that a 20 or so grit wheel would work pretty well.  If the scratches are the same size and shape as the threading, do you really care if they are parallel?

      Dave  8{)

      --


      "Among the many misdeeds of British rule in India, history will look upon the Act of depriving a whole nation of arms as the blackest."

      Mohandus Ghandi, An Autobiography, Page 446.
    • Alexis
      Ouch!! Of all the things I hate to translate, it has to be machining, because Spanish simply doesn´t have enough words in its vocabulary to differentiate
      Message 3 of 3 , Jan 24, 2013
        Ouch!! Of all the things I hate to translate, it has to be machining, because Spanish simply doesn´t have enough words in its vocabulary to differentiate between slightly different ideas or processes. I am pretty good at it, though, so once I understand, it isn´t so hard. (Sigh)

        I have to check on the need for parallel grooves, but I think I have the rest.

        Thanks Dave, I´ll have an answer after a while for this.

        Alexis

        --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "David G. LeVine" wrote:
        >
        > On 01/23/2013 11:10 AM, Dr. Alexis O'Neill wrote:
        > > Good morning, Here is a spec sheet that we follow to prepare substrates for spraying. Hope it helps give a clearer idea of what we need to do.
        > >
        > > We do this with small pieces now, but the large jobs are beyond anyone within a very long driving distance.
        > >
        > > Alexis
        >
        > I hope this does not hurt the translator too much .
        >
        > Multi-start threading has more than one thread on the same workpiece
        > which starts at a different rotation. For example, a two start thread
        > might start at 0° and at 180° With a canted wheel cut to a specific
        > profile, one can make multiple start threads with many starts, let's say
        > 20 TPI and 20 starts with a 1" feed rate.
        >
        > Let's assume a simple thread which can be made at 1-2 RPM (remember,
        > this is the HUGE workpiece.) at 20 turns per inch and 1 RPM, you get 20
        > minutes per inch. Given that 10 meters is 390 inches, it will take 130
        > HOURS to cut the thread. Do the math yourself.
        >
        > Now, same machine, but multiple start threads and a 1" feed. That means
        > 1 minute per inch or 6.5 hours to thread 10 meters, half that if the
        > threads start with two grinders.Take a wheel with annular grooves
        > (around the rim), cant it at the correct angle and feed it at 1"/rev.
        > It will take some head scratching, but I think it might help you see
        > both the advantages and desirability. Alternatively, a very coarse
        > wheel will leave deep scratches which MIGHT be sufficient. Look at a
        > surface ground with an angle grinder with a 36 grit disk. Of course,
        > the disk would need to be fresh or the scratches
        >
        > My GUESS would be that a 20 or so grit wheel would work pretty well. If
        > the scratches are the same size and shape as the threading, do you
        > really care if they are parallel?
        >
        > Dave 8{)
        >
        > --
        >
        >
        > /"Among the many misdeeds of British rule in India, history will look
        > upon the Act of depriving a whole nation of arms as the blackest."/
        >
        > Mohandus Ghandi, An Autobiography, Page 446.
        >
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