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Re: Wow! going to need help with this!

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  • Stan
    I forgot this . A $20 laser aimed accurately down the ways and a piece of paper to help true the stock. Operator manually adjusts. stan ... up ... A ... us
    Message 1 of 21 , Jan 19, 2013
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      I forgot this . A $20 laser aimed accurately down the ways and a piece
      of paper to help "true" the stock. Operator manually adjusts.

      stan


      --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Stan" wrote:
      >
      > Hi Guys!
      > This all depends on how accurate you want. Here is a real rough
      > concept.
      > Two large single axle complete trucks, at least one runs. Jack them
      up
      > without wheels. over a bed of railroad rails, 4 feet off the ground .
      > pour concrete around the axles and frames. The non-running truck on a
      > rail dolly of some sort. Lock it with jacks. A piece of 1"? plate 6
      > feet across for a face plate on one rear axle, the truck that runs. .
      A
      > drill stem bolted to the other truck axle for a center. Also some of
      us
      > guys remember the pulp wood trucks with the pto axle winch. The 2
      brake
      > master cylinders one for stop, the other on the far side for a spindle
      > speed feather. The engine and transmission factory installed run it.
      The
      > brake takes up the drivetrain slop until under a load. I had a single
      > axle truck with a 38,000 lb axle and a 200 hp cat 3208 in it. I paid
      > $3000 for it and drove it 8 hours a day for 5 years. I think total
      parts
      > cost could be $30,000. sourcing easy. You could Just scale up a
      modified
      > standard carriage. Winch it both ways with a cable winch. Tooling
      would
      > be expensive. Most used trucks and buses I know of head south of the
      > border anyway. Hardest part is alignment. 6 Foot by 20 -30' or larger
      > possible? Rough, I know, but conceivable, if not practicle. Maybe
      start
      > with 2 pickups?
      >
      > Stan
      >
      > ToolFools Talk
      >
      >
      > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "David G. LeVine" wrote:
      > >
      > > On 01/19/2013 10:10 AM, keith gutshall wrote:
      > > > The headstock is going to take up 3-4 feet.
      > >
      > > I would guess even more, but that is based on some monster lathes
      > where
      > > the headstock was 6+' long. Each bushing (anti-friction rolling
      > element
      > > bearings may be too expensive) will be around 6" wide, expect at
      least
      > > two. Now, add in the belt drive (8" or more wide) and you get to 2'
      > in
      > > a short time. Add a few more things and...
      > >
      > > > Building a spindle to hold a 10 ton load is going to be a large
      > size
      > > > part.
      > >
      > > Yes, but it will be trivial compared to the rest. Big truck engine
      > > bearings should do the deed, but will need a high pressure oil
      system.
      > >
      > > > Does the spindle need to be hollow?
      > >
      > > Generally, yes. It makes for easier tooling mounting.
      > >
      > > This may be an example where CNC is CHEAPER than mechanical change
      > > gears. AN old PIV may be so close to free it doesn't matter.
      > >
      > > Dave 8{)
      > >
      > > --
      > >
      > >
      > > /"Among the many misdeeds of British rule in India, history will
      look
      > > upon the Act of depriving a whole nation of arms as the blackest."/
      > >
      > > Mohandus Ghandi, An Autobiography, Page 446.
      > >
      >
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