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Who Has The Multimachine in Africa?

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  • gachubah
    Dear All, Just inquiring, who has this machine in Africa and in particular, in Kenya? I am interested in having a simple water drill made for me for my farm in
    Message 1 of 16 , Dec 20, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      Dear All,

      Just inquiring, who has this machine in Africa and in particular, in Kenya? I am interested in having a simple water drill made for me for my farm in Kenya.

      Or, if one is built in the West, what is the cost?

      Rgds

      Gachuba
    • Pat Delany
      How deep are the wells? Pat ________________________________ From: gachubah To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, December 20,
      Message 2 of 16 , Dec 20, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        How deep are the wells?

        Pat


        From: gachubah <gachubah@...>
        To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, December 20, 2012 6:07 AM
        Subject: [multimachine] Who Has The Multimachine in Africa?

         
        Dear All,

        Just inquiring, who has this machine in Africa and in particular, in Kenya? I am interested in having a simple water drill made for me for my farm in Kenya.

        Or, if one is built in the West, what is the cost?

        Rgds

        Gachuba



      • StoneTool
        May I suggest a cable tool drilling rig..... The cable tool, most commonly the Bucyrus Erie has been in existence far longer than the rotary, and is capable
        Message 3 of 16 , Dec 20, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
              May I suggest a cable tool drilling rig.....  The cable tool, most commonly the Bucyrus Erie has been in existence far longer than the rotary, and is capable of drilling to great depth.   They do not require expensive rotary bits, compressors, mud pumps, etc.   The tool string consists of a single drill stem (solid), with a rather large solid bit in a more or less figure 8 shape with a swivel at the top of the drill stem.  It is attached to a cable and a rocker assembly lifts and drops the bit.  Each time it rotates slightly.  A baler on a high speed winch lifts the cuttings out of the hole.  A fairly small amount of water is used to create a slurry which can be easily baled out.  They will drill in any type of ground with proper technique.    They are NOT fast, but are exceedingly inexpensive to operate, and require only one man.  One bit will last a lifetime, and is built up with weld between or during drilling.  Most drillers have a pair and often spend time welding on one bit while the other is pounding away.   The clutch and brake setup can be adjusted so the machine drills merrily away while the operator kicks back between baling cycles.   Most water wells in this area were drilled with these machines until recent years, and range from 60' down to 800'.  It was not uncommon for a driller to leave a rig on a hole for weeks at a time, spending a day here and a day there working on it.   Without the labor of tripping in and tripping out, breaking down a long string of expensive drill stem, it's easy to drill when you have the time.   Fuel costs are trivial, and maintenance is minimal.  
              I recently sold one, and have also partnered in a rotary.   The rotary gives the satisfaction of fast results, but at huge cost.  Bits at anywhere from $500 up, seldom last very many holes, and I've worn them out before finishing a hole.   Hundreds of gallons of fuel to run the rig and the compressor 800 CFM in our case.  
              The cable tool uses a crankshaft assembly which drives the rocker that pulls down on the cable between the drum and the head of the rig, lifting the tool, and returns dropping it.  Head springs or rubber cushions at the top of the mast under the head block are an important detail.   It would not be difficult to build one of these from photos and drawings.   The derrick is simple, consisting of two pieces of channel iron with cross pieces between, and trussing......... not heavy or complex. 
              If time is more important than cost....... a rotary is the way to go......... If cost matters, a cable tool can't be beaten.   My rig cost less than the price of having a rotary drill one well!!  And it will still be drilling wells when that rotary is melted down and part of the latest crop of Japanese cars...;-)

                                                                      Howard

          On 12/20/2012 07:25 PM, Pat Delany wrote:
          How deep are the wells?

          Pat


          From: gachubah <gachubah@...>
          To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thursday, December 20, 2012 6:07 AM
          Subject: [multimachine] Who Has The Multimachine in Africa?

           
          Dear All,

          Just inquiring, who has this machine in Africa and in particular, in Kenya? I am interested in having a simple water drill made for me for my farm in Kenya.

          Or, if one is built in the West, what is the cost?

          Rgds

          Gachuba




        • T T
          Hi! I am from Africa and would like to build a cable tool drilling rig. How would i go about it, plans etc. Regards. Theo.
          Message 4 of 16 , Dec 20, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi!

            I am from Africa and would like to build a cable tool drilling rig.

            How would i go about it, plans etc.
            Regards.
            Theo.

            On 21 December 2012 06:35, StoneTool <owly@...> wrote:
             

                May I suggest a cable tool drilling rig.....  The cable tool, most commonly the Bucyrus Erie has been in existence far longer than the rotary, and is capable of drilling to great depth.   They do not require expensive rotary bits, compressors, mud pumps, etc.   The tool string consists of a single drill stem (solid), with a rather large solid bit in a more or less figure 8 shape with a swivel at the top of the drill stem.  It is attached to a cable and a rocker assembly lifts and drops the bit.  Each time it rotates slightly.  A baler on a high speed winch lifts the cuttings out of the hole.  A fairly small amount of water is used to create a slurry which can be easily baled out.  They will drill in any type of ground with proper technique.    They are NOT fast, but are exceedingly inexpensive to operate, and require only one man.  One bit will last a lifetime, and is built up with weld between or during drilling.  Most drillers have a pair and often spend time welding on one bit while the other is pounding away.   The clutch and brake setup can be adjusted so the machine drills merrily away while the operator kicks back between baling cycles.   Most water wells in this area were drilled with these machines until recent years, and range from 60' down to 800'.  It was not uncommon for a driller to leave a rig on a hole for weeks at a time, spending a day here and a day there working on it.   Without the labor of tripping in and tripping out, breaking down a long string of expensive drill stem, it's easy to drill when you have the time.   Fuel costs are trivial, and maintenance is minimal.  
                I recently sold one, and have also partnered in a rotary.   The rotary gives the satisfaction of fast results, but at huge cost.  Bits at anywhere from $500 up, seldom last very many holes, and I've worn them out before finishing a hole.   Hundreds of gallons of fuel to run the rig and the compressor 800 CFM in our case.  
                The cable tool uses a crankshaft assembly which drives the rocker that pulls down on the cable between the drum and the head of the rig, lifting the tool, and returns dropping it.  Head springs or rubber cushions at the top of the mast under the head block are an important detail.   It would not be difficult to build one of these from photos and drawings.   The derrick is simple, consisting of two pieces of channel iron with cross pieces between, and trussing......... not heavy or complex. 
                If time is more important than cost....... a rotary is the way to go......... If cost matters, a cable tool can't be beaten.   My rig cost less than the price of having a rotary drill one well!!  And it will still be drilling wells when that rotary is melted down and part of the latest crop of Japanese cars...;-)

                                                                        Howard

            On 12/20/2012 07:25 PM, Pat Delany wrote:

            How deep are the wells?

            Pat


            From: gachubah <gachubah@...>
            To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thursday, December 20, 2012 6:07 AM
            Subject: [multimachine] Who Has The Multimachine in Africa?

             
            Dear All,

            Just inquiring, who has this machine in Africa and in particular, in Kenya? I am interested in having a simple water drill made for me for my farm in Kenya.

            Or, if one is built in the West, what is the cost?

            Rgds

            Gachuba





          • Shannon DeWolfe
            No time to search for plans this morning -- got to go to work. But a quick Google search turned up a video of this home built drill:
            Message 5 of 16 , Dec 21, 2012
            • 0 Attachment
              No time to search for plans this morning -- got to go to work. But a
              quick Google search turned up a video of this home built drill:

              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xgC69vQQS20

              Regards,

              Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
              --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 56 year old fat man.

              On 12/20/2012 11:03 PM, T T wrote:
              >
              > Hi!
              >
              >
              > I am from Africa and would like to build a cable tool drilling rig.
              >
              > How would i go about it, plans etc.
              > Regards.
              > Theo.
              >
              > On 21 December 2012 06:35, StoneTool <owly@...
              > <mailto:owly@...>> wrote:
              >
              > May I suggest a cable tool drilling rig.....
              >
            • Shannon DeWolfe
              OK, now I m running late! http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&v=nYNQt36VayM&NR=1 Regards, Mr. Shannon DeWolfe --I ve taken to using Mr. because my
              Message 6 of 16 , Dec 21, 2012
              • 0 Attachment
                OK, now I'm running late!

                http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&v=nYNQt36VayM&NR=1

                Regards,

                Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
                --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 56 year old fat man.

                On 12/20/2012 11:03 PM, T T wrote:
                >
                > Hi!
                >
                >
                > I am from Africa and would like to build a cable tool drilling rig.
              • StoneTool
                Theo: There is at least one set of plans on the web, as well as countless articles and photos. I cannot imagine that in Africa there are not a number of
                Message 7 of 16 , Dec 21, 2012
                • 0 Attachment
                  Theo:
                      There is at least one set of "plans" on the web, as well as countless articles and photos.    I cannot imagine that in Africa there are not a number of these sitting around.  I would start by reading and researching on the internet.  Then searching the country around you for old rigs when you know what you are looking at.  Building any rig is an expensive proposition.   In this cases you need winches (as on all rigs), clutch assemblies to operate those winches, the derrick itself........ which can even be built from wood as in the old days.   You will need mainline cable which is left lay cable (opposite normal) so that it does not tend to unscrew the tools.   You will need a drill stem which is a solid shaft about 3" diameter and 16-20 feet long with a female thread on one end ("box") and a male thread on the other ("pin").  You will need a swivel assembly for the top which screws to the top of the drill stem, with a matching thread.  It will contain the cable which is inserted through the top, and then through a metal "thimble", flared out and poured full of hot babbitt inside the thimble.  The assembly slid together so that the thimble allows the cable to rotate when there is no weight on it during the brief moment when it hits bottom, before the cable snatches it back.  And you will need a bit or two.   You will also need to have casing drive blocks that clamp to flats on the drill stem, and of course "J wrenches" to break down your "drill string".   You will need a baler for bringing muck out of the well, and a fast winch to operate it.   You will also want an additional winch to handle casing and such tasks.   You will also of course need an engine with and out clutch.
                      The best thing of course is to find a complete rig, and ultimately it will be the least expensive in all probability.   You can of course purchase a rig and tooling overseas.    They are easy to install or remove from the truck or whatever they are mounted on.   Without the truck and without the derrick a rig would not be a large item to ship.   The tools are a very significant acquisition, and left lay cable may not be locally available.  Every part of a cable drilling rig could be locally built.   If I were in your shoes and had the time and money to build a rig from the ground up, I would probably use left hand thread on my stem and tools so I could use ordinary cable. 
                      It's a big project, and an expensive one............ but not compared to a rotary rig.    Start with Google........

                                                                                              Howard

                  P.S.   I'm a relative neophyte........   It's best to find someone with far more experience to guide you.   Talk to local drillers.   You will want to know about ground conditions, formations, depth, and local techniques.

                  PPS   How many wells?   How deep?   What kind of ground?

                  On 12/20/2012 10:03 PM, T T wrote: Hi!

                  I am from Africa and would like to build a cable tool drilling rig.

                  How would i go about it, plans etc.
                  Regards.
                  Theo.

                  On 21 December 2012 06:35, StoneTool <owly@...> wrote:
                   

                      May I suggest a cable tool drilling rig.....  The cable tool, most commonly the Bucyrus Erie has been in existence far longer than the rotary, and is capable of drilling to great depth.   They do not require expensive rotary bits, compressors, mud pumps, etc.   The tool string consists of a single drill stem (solid), with a rather large solid bit in a more or less figure 8 shape with a swivel at the top of the drill stem.  It is attached to a cable and a rocker assembly lifts and drops the bit.  Each time it rotates slightly.  A baler on a high speed winch lifts the cuttings out of the hole.  A fairly small amount of water is used to create a slurry which can be easily baled out.  They will drill in any type of ground with proper technique.    They are NOT fast, but are exceedingly inexpensive to operate, and require only one man.  One bit will last a lifetime, and is built up with weld between or during drilling.  Most drillers have a pair and often spend time welding on one bit while the other is pounding away.   The clutch and brake setup can be adjusted so the machine drills merrily away while the operator kicks back between baling cycles.   Most water wells in this area were drilled with these machines until recent years, and range from 60' down to 800'.  It was not uncommon for a driller to leave a rig on a hole for weeks at a time, spending a day here and a day there working on it.   Without the labor of tripping in and tripping out, breaking down a long string of expensive drill stem, it's easy to drill when you have the time.   Fuel costs are trivial, and maintenance is minimal.  
                      I recently sold one, and have also partnered in a rotary.   The rotary gives the satisfaction of fast results, but at huge cost.  Bits at anywhere from $500 up, seldom last very many holes, and I've worn them out before finishing a hole.   Hundreds of gallons of fuel to run the rig and the compressor 800 CFM in our case.  
                      The cable tool uses a crankshaft assembly which drives the rocker that pulls down on the cable between the drum and the head of the rig, lifting the tool, and returns dropping it.  Head springs or rubber cushions at the top of the mast under the head block are an important detail.   It would not be difficult to build one of these from photos and drawings.   The derrick is simple, consisting of two pieces of channel iron with cross pieces between, and trussing......... not heavy or complex. 
                      If time is more important than cost....... a rotary is the way to go......... If cost matters, a cable tool can't be beaten.   My rig cost less than the price of having a rotary drill one well!!  And it will still be drilling wells when that rotary is melted down and part of the latest crop of Japanese cars...;-)

                                                                              Howard

                  On 12/20/2012 07:25 PM, Pat Delany wrote:

                  How deep are the wells?

                  Pat


                  From: gachubah <gachubah@...>
                  To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Thursday, December 20, 2012 6:07 AM
                  Subject: [multimachine] Who Has The Multimachine in Africa?

                   
                  Dear All,

                  Just inquiring, who has this machine in Africa and in particular, in Kenya? I am interested in having a simple water drill made for me for my farm in Kenya.

                  Or, if one is built in the West, what is the cost?

                  Rgds

                  Gachuba






                • Pat Delany
                  Late or not, a GREAT job! Pat ________________________________ From: Shannon DeWolfe To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com Sent: Friday,
                  Message 8 of 16 , Dec 21, 2012
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Late or not, a GREAT job!

                    Pat


                    From: Shannon DeWolfe <sdewolfe@...>
                    To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Friday, December 21, 2012 6:11 AM
                    Subject: Re: [multimachine] Who Has The Multimachine in Africa?

                    OK, now I'm running late!

                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&v=nYNQt36VayM&NR=1

                    Regards,

                    Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
                    --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 56 year old fat man.

                    On 12/20/2012 11:03 PM, T T wrote:
                    >
                    > Hi!
                    >
                    >
                    > I am from Africa and would like to build a cable tool drilling rig.



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                  • Larry Bentley
                    Howard is right the cable tool machine can drill just about anything and the EMAS videos on youtube and Vimeo show very basic low tech ways of using homemade
                    Message 9 of 16 , Dec 21, 2012
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Howard is right the cable tool machine can drill just about anything and the EMAS videos on youtube and Vimeo show very basic low tech ways of using homemade tooling to drill water wells.  Now in some geology other drilling methods may be better but a cable tool will work, just may not be best.  The cable tool or precussion isn't great in sand along coastal areas, but lightweight rotary machines don't drill rock well where a cable tools does fine.  Different methods work well in different geology formations.
                       
                      Another good source to look at is http://wellspringafrica.org/    I've got a couple of friends actively involved in drilling water wells in West Africa and East Central Africa but it's a big place so can't tell if they are close enough to call on.
                       
                      His questions of what the local geology is and how deep the wells tend to be are important.  I have a friend who drilled in Kenya to 1000' (300 meters) and only got a deep post hole (dry well).  When I drilled in Benin, the wells were pretty shallow.  And in Uganda and Malawai I've seen some pretty shallow wells that produced very well.  So tell us where you are and what the local geology is (rock, sand, clay etc..) and we might can help some more with places to look for plans and methods.  I've got plenty of info and hand operated well pumps, but some countries have national chosen to support one type of pump or another so I can't say what is best for you yet.  Best pump is one where there is local parts support and folks who know how to fix it.  Everything  made by man breaks sooner or later, so repair has to be part of the planning.
                       
                       
                      Larry

                      Theo:
                          There is at least one set of "plans" on the web, as well as countless articles and photos.    I cannot imagine that in Africa there are not a number of these sitting around.  I would start by reading and researching on the internet.  Then searching the country around you for old rigs when you know what you are looking at.  Building any rig is an expensive proposition.   In this cases you need winches (as on all rigs), clutch assemblies to operate those winches, the derrick itself........ which can even be built from wood as in the old days.   You will need mainline cable which is left lay cable (opposite normal) so that it does not tend to unscrew the tools.   You will need a drill stem which is a solid shaft about 3" diameter and 16-20 feet long with a female thread on one end ("box") and a male thread on the other ("pin").  You will need a swivel assembly for the top which screws to the top of the drill stem, with a matching thread.  It will contain the cable which is inserted through the top, and then through a metal "thimble", flared out and poured full of hot babbitt inside the thimble.  The assembly slid together so that the thimble allows the cable to rotate when there is no weight on it during the brief moment when it hits bottom, before the cable snatches it back.  And you will need a bit or two.   You will also need to have casing drive blocks that clamp to flats on the drill stem, and of course "J wrenches" to break down your "drill string".   You will need a baler for bringing muck out of the well, and a fast winch to operate it.   You will also want an additional winch to handle casing and such tasks.   You will also of course need an engine with and out clutch.
                          The best thing of course is to find a complete rig, and ultimately it will be the least expensive in all probability.   You can of course purchase a rig and tooling overseas.    They are easy to install or remove from the truck or whatever they are mounted on.   Without the truck and without the derrick a rig would not be a large item to ship.   The tools are a very significant acquisition, and left lay cable may not be locally available.  Every part of a cable drilling rig could be locally built.   If I were in your shoes and had the time and money to build a rig from the ground up, I would probably use left hand thread on my stem and tools so I could use ordinary cable. 
                          It's a big project, and an expensive one............ but not compared to a rotary rig.    Start with Google........

                                                                                                  Howard

                      P.S.   I'm a relative neophyte........   It's best to find someone with far more experience to guide you.   Talk to local drillers.   You will want to know about ground conditions, formations, depth, and local techniques.

                      PPS   How many wells?   How deep?   What kind of ground?

                      On 12/20/2012 10:03 PM, T T wrote: Hi!

                      I am from Africa and would like to build a cable tool drilling rig.

                      How would i go about it, plans etc.
                      Regards.
                      Theo.

                      On 21 December 2012 06:35, StoneTool  wrote:
                       

                          May I suggest a cable tool drilling rig.....  The cable tool, most commonly the Bucyrus Erie has been in existence far longer than the rotary, and is capable of drilling to great depth.   They do not require expensive rotary bits, compressors, mud pumps, etc.   The tool string consists of a single drill stem (solid), with a rather large solid bit in a more or less figure 8 shape with a swivel at the top of the drill stem.  It is attached to a cable and a rocker assembly lifts and drops the bit.  Each time it rotates slightly.  A baler on a high speed winch lifts the cuttings out of the hole.  A fairly small amount of water is used to create a slurry which can be easily baled out.  They will drill in any type of ground with proper technique.    They are NOT fast, but are exceedingly inexpensive to operate, and require only one man.  One bit will last a lifetime, and is built up with weld between or during drilling.  Most drillers have a pair and often spend time welding on one bit while the other is pounding away.   The clutch and brake setup can be adjusted so the machine drills merrily away while the operator kicks back between baling cycles.   Most water wells in this area were drilled with these machines until recent years, and range from 60' down to 800'.  It was not uncommon for a driller to leave a rig on a hole for weeks at a time, spending a day here and a day there working on it.   Without the labor of tripping in and tripping out, breaking down a long string of expensive drill stem, it's easy to drill when you have the time.   Fuel costs are trivial, and maintenance is minimal.  
                          I recently sold one, and have also partnered in a rotary.   The rotary gives the satisfaction of fast results, but at huge cost.  Bits at anywhere from $500 up, seldom last very many holes, and I've worn them out before finishing a hole.   Hundreds of gallons of fuel to run the rig and the compressor 800 CFM in our case.  
                          The cable tool uses a crankshaft assembly which drives the rocker that pulls down on the cable between the drum and the head of the rig, lifting the tool, and returns dropping it.  Head springs or rubber cushions at the top of the mast under the head block are an important detail.   It would not be difficult to build one of these from photos and drawings.   The derrick is simple, consisting of two pieces of channel iron with cross pieces between, and trussing......... not heavy or complex. 
                          If time is more important than cost....... a rotary is the way to go......... If cost matters, a cable tool can't be beaten.   My rig cost less than the price of having a rotary drill one well!!  And it will still be drilling wells when that rotary is melted down and part of the latest crop of Japanese cars...;-)

                                                                                  Howard

                      On 12/20/2012 07:25 PM, Pat Delany wrote:

                      How deep are the wells?

                      Pat


                      From: gachubah <gachubah@...>
                      To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Thursday, December 20, 2012 6:07 AM
                      Subject: [multimachine] Who Has The Multimachine in Africa?

                       
                      Dear All,

                      Just inquiring, who has this machine in Africa and in particular, in Kenya? I am interested in having a simple water drill made for me for my farm in Kenya.

                      Or, if one is built in the West, what is the cost?

                      Rgds

                      Gachuba






                    • StoneTool
                      Larry: Actually cable tool works fine in sand and gravel. You start a piece of casing and the casing follows the drill right down. With a rotary machine in
                      Message 10 of 16 , Dec 21, 2012
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Larry:
                            Actually cable tool works fine in sand and gravel.  You start a piece of casing and the casing follows the drill right down.  With a rotary machine in those conditions some seriously heavy mud is required, and it then has to be cased. 
                            In drilling, knowing your geology is probably the most important thing........  Knowing what other people have hit in the area. 
                           
                            A fool repeats the same mistakes again and again.

                            A wise man learns from his mistakes

                            A successful man learns from the mistakes of others

                                                                                                                                    Howard



                        On 12/21/2012 05:38 PM, Larry Bentley wrote:
                        Howard is right the cable tool machine can drill just about anything and the EMAS videos on youtube and Vimeo show very basic low tech ways of using homemade tooling to drill water wells.  Now in some geology other drilling methods may be better but a cable tool will work, just may not be best.  The cable tool or precussion isn't great in sand along coastal areas, but lightweight rotary machines don't drill rock well where a cable tools does fine.  Different methods work well in different geology formations.
                         
                        Another good source to look at is http://wellspringafrica.org/    I've got a couple of friends actively involved in drilling water wells in West Africa and East Central Africa but it's a big place so can't tell if they are close enough to call on.
                         
                        His questions of what the local geology is and how deep the wells tend to be are important.  I have a friend who drilled in Kenya to 1000' (300 meters) and only got a deep post hole (dry well).  When I drilled in Benin, the wells were pretty shallow.  And in Uganda and Malawai I've seen some pretty shallow wells that produced very well.  So tell us where you are and what the local geology is (rock, sand, clay etc..) and we might can help some more with places to look for plans and methods.  I've got plenty of info and hand operated well pumps, but some countries have national chosen to support one type of pump or another so I can't say what is best for you yet.  Best pump is one where there is local parts support and folks who know how to fix it.  Everything  made by man breaks sooner or later, so repair has to be part of the planning.
                         
                         
                        Larry

                        Theo:
                            There is at least one set of "plans" on the web, as well as countless articles and photos.    I cannot imagine that in Africa there are not a number of these sitting around.  I would start by reading and researching on the internet.  Then searching the country around you for old rigs when you know what you are looking at.  Building any rig is an expensive proposition.   In this cases you need winches (as on all rigs), clutch assemblies to operate those winches, the derrick itself........ which can even be built from wood as in the old days.   You will need mainline cable which is left lay cable (opposite normal) so that it does not tend to unscrew the tools.   You will need a drill stem which is a solid shaft about 3" diameter and 16-20 feet long with a female thread on one end ("box") and a male thread on the other ("pin").  You will need a swivel assembly for the top which screws to the top of the drill stem, with a matching thread.  It will contain the cable which is inserted through the top, and then through a metal "thimble", flared out and poured full of hot babbitt inside the thimble.  The assembly slid together so that the thimble allows the cable to rotate when there is no weight on it during the brief moment when it hits bottom, before the cable snatches it back.  And you will need a bit or two.   You will also need to have casing drive blocks that clamp to flats on the drill stem, and of course "J wrenches" to break down your "drill string".   You will need a baler for bringing muck out of the well, and a fast winch to operate it.   You will also want an additional winch to handle casing and such tasks.   You will also of course need an engine with and out clutch.
                            The best thing of course is to find a complete rig, and ultimately it will be the least expensive in all probability.   You can of course purchase a rig and tooling overseas.    They are easy to install or remove from the truck or whatever they are mounted on.   Without the truck and without the derrick a rig would not be a large item to ship.   The tools are a very significant acquisition, and left lay cable may not be locally available.  Every part of a cable drilling rig could be locally built.   If I were in your shoes and had the time and money to build a rig from the ground up, I would probably use left hand thread on my stem and tools so I could use ordinary cable. 
                            It's a big project, and an expensive one............ but not compared to a rotary rig.    Start with Google........

                                                                                                    Howard

                        P.S.   I'm a relative neophyte........   It's best to find someone with far more experience to guide you.   Talk to local drillers.   You will want to know about ground conditions, formations, depth, and local techniques.

                        PPS   How many wells?   How deep?   What kind of ground?

                        On 12/20/2012 10:03 PM, T T wrote: Hi!

                        I am from Africa and would like to build a cable tool drilling rig.

                        How would i go about it, plans etc.
                        Regards.
                        Theo.

                        On 21 December 2012 06:35, StoneTool  wrote:
                         

                            May I suggest a cable tool drilling rig.....  The cable tool, most commonly the Bucyrus Erie has been in existence far longer than the rotary, and is capable of drilling to great depth.   They do not require expensive rotary bits, compressors, mud pumps, etc.   The tool string consists of a single drill stem (solid), with a rather large solid bit in a more or less figure 8 shape with a swivel at the top of the drill stem.  It is attached to a cable and a rocker assembly lifts and drops the bit.  Each time it rotates slightly.  A baler on a high speed winch lifts the cuttings out of the hole.  A fairly small amount of water is used to create a slurry which can be easily baled out.  They will drill in any type of ground with proper technique.    They are NOT fast, but are exceedingly inexpensive to operate, and require only one man.  One bit will last a lifetime, and is built up with weld between or during drilling.  Most drillers have a pair and often spend time welding on one bit while the other is pounding away.   The clutch and brake setup can be adjusted so the machine drills merrily away while the operator kicks back between baling cycles.   Most water wells in this area were drilled with these machines until recent years, and range from 60' down to 800'.  It was not uncommon for a driller to leave a rig on a hole for weeks at a time, spending a day here and a day there working on it.   Without the labor of tripping in and tripping out, breaking down a long string of expensive drill stem, it's easy to drill when you have the time.   Fuel costs are trivial, and maintenance is minimal.  
                            I recently sold one, and have also partnered in a rotary.   The rotary gives the satisfaction of fast results, but at huge cost.  Bits at anywhere from $500 up, seldom last very many holes, and I've worn them out before finishing a hole.   Hundreds of gallons of fuel to run the rig and the compressor 800 CFM in our case.  
                            The cable tool uses a crankshaft assembly which drives the rocker that pulls down on the cable between the drum and the head of the rig, lifting the tool, and returns dropping it.  Head springs or rubber cushions at the top of the mast under the head block are an important detail.   It would not be difficult to build one of these from photos and drawings.   The derrick is simple, consisting of two pieces of channel iron with cross pieces between, and trussing......... not heavy or complex. 
                            If time is more important than cost....... a rotary is the way to go......... If cost matters, a cable tool can't be beaten.   My rig cost less than the price of having a rotary drill one well!!  And it will still be drilling wells when that rotary is melted down and part of the latest crop of Japanese cars...;-)

                                                                                    Howard

                        On 12/20/2012 07:25 PM, Pat Delany wrote:

                        How deep are the wells?

                        Pat


                        From: gachubah <gachubah@...>
                        To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Thursday, December 20, 2012 6:07 AM
                        Subject: [multimachine] Who Has The Multimachine in Africa?

                         
                        Dear All,

                        Just inquiring, who has this machine in Africa and in particular, in Kenya? I am interested in having a simple water drill made for me for my farm in Kenya.

                        Or, if one is built in the West, what is the cost?

                        Rgds

                        Gachuba







                      • T T
                        Hi! I have been researching on the web methods on how to drill and how to make the bits etc. What intrigues me is that in various articles I have read they
                        Message 11 of 16 , Dec 21, 2012
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Hi! 

                          I have been researching on the web methods on how to drill and how to make the bits etc.

                          What intrigues me is that in various articles I have read they refer to drilling hundreds if not thousands of feet 

                          Keeping in mind they did have have steel casings in 1000 BC what did they do?
                          Regards.
                          Theo.

                          On 22 December 2012 07:49, StoneTool <owly@...> wrote:
                           

                          Larry:
                              Actually cable tool works fine in sand and gravel.  You start a piece of casing and the casing follows the drill right down.  With a rotary machine in those conditions some seriously heavy mud is required, and it then has to be cased. 
                              In drilling, knowing your geology is probably the most important thing........  Knowing what other people have hit in the area. 
                             
                              A fool repeats the same mistakes again and again.

                              A wise man learns from his mistakes

                              A successful man learns from the mistakes of others

                                                                                                                                      Howard



                          On 12/21/2012 05:38 PM, Larry Bentley wrote:

                          Howard is right the cable tool machine can drill just about anything and the EMAS videos on youtube and Vimeo show very basic low tech ways of using homemade tooling to drill water wells.  Now in some geology other drilling methods may be better but a cable tool will work, just may not be best.  The cable tool or precussion isn't great in sand along coastal areas, but lightweight rotary machines don't drill rock well where a cable tools does fine.  Different methods work well in different geology formations.
                           
                          Another good source to look at is http://wellspringafrica.org/    I've got a couple of friends actively involved in drilling water wells in West Africa and East Central Africa but it's a big place so can't tell if they are close enough to call on.
                           
                          His questions of what the local geology is and how deep the wells tend to be are important.  I have a friend who drilled in Kenya to 1000' (300 meters) and only got a deep post hole (dry well).  When I drilled in Benin, the wells were pretty shallow.  And in Uganda and Malawai I've seen some pretty shallow wells that produced very well.  So tell us where you are and what the local geology is (rock, sand, clay etc..) and we might can help some more with places to look for plans and methods.  I've got plenty of info and hand operated well pumps, but some countries have national chosen to support one type of pump or another so I can't say what is best for you yet.  Best pump is one where there is local parts support and folks who know how to fix it.  Everything  made by man breaks sooner or later, so repair has to be part of the planning.
                           
                           
                          Larry

                          Theo:
                              There is at least one set of "plans" on the web, as well as countless articles and photos.    I cannot imagine that in Africa there are not a number of these sitting around.  I would start by reading and researching on the internet.  Then searching the country around you for old rigs when you know what you are looking at.  Building any rig is an expensive proposition.   In this cases you need winches (as on all rigs), clutch assemblies to operate those winches, the derrick itself........ which can even be built from wood as in the old days.   You will need mainline cable which is left lay cable (opposite normal) so that it does not tend to unscrew the tools.   You will need a drill stem which is a solid shaft about 3" diameter and 16-20 feet long with a female thread on one end ("box") and a male thread on the other ("pin").  You will need a swivel assembly for the top which screws to the top of the drill stem, with a matching thread.  It will contain the cable which is inserted through the top, and then through a metal "thimble", flared out and poured full of hot babbitt inside the thimble.  The assembly slid together so that the thimble allows the cable to rotate when there is no weight on it during the brief moment when it hits bottom, before the cable snatches it back.  And you will need a bit or two.   You will also need to have casing drive blocks that clamp to flats on the drill stem, and of course "J wrenches" to break down your "drill string".   You will need a baler for bringing muck out of the well, and a fast winch to operate it.   You will also want an additional winch to handle casing and such tasks.   You will also of course need an engine with and out clutch.
                              The best thing of course is to find a complete rig, and ultimately it will be the least expensive in all probability.   You can of course purchase a rig and tooling overseas.    They are easy to install or remove from the truck or whatever they are mounted on.   Without the truck and without the derrick a rig would not be a large item to ship.   The tools are a very significant acquisition, and left lay cable may not be locally available.  Every part of a cable drilling rig could be locally built.   If I were in your shoes and had the time and money to build a rig from the ground up, I would probably use left hand thread on my stem and tools so I could use ordinary cable. 
                              It's a big project, and an expensive one............ but not compared to a rotary rig.    Start with Google........

                                                                                                      Howard

                          P.S.   I'm a relative neophyte........   It's best to find someone with far more experience to guide you.   Talk to local drillers.   You will want to know about ground conditions, formations, depth, and local techniques.

                          PPS   How many wells?   How deep?   What kind of ground?

                          On 12/20/2012 10:03 PM, T T wrote:
                          Hi!

                          I am from Africa and would like to build a cable tool drilling rig.

                          How would i go about it, plans etc.
                          Regards.
                          Theo.

                          On 21 December 2012 06:35, StoneTool  wrote:
                           

                              May I suggest a cable tool drilling rig.....  The cable tool, most commonly the Bucyrus Erie has been in existence far longer than the rotary, and is capable of drilling to great depth.   They do not require expensive rotary bits, compressors, mud pumps, etc.   The tool string consists of a single drill stem (solid), with a rather large solid bit in a more or less figure 8 shape with a swivel at the top of the drill stem.  It is attached to a cable and a rocker assembly lifts and drops the bit.  Each time it rotates slightly.  A baler on a high speed winch lifts the cuttings out of the hole.  A fairly small amount of water is used to create a slurry which can be easily baled out.  They will drill in any type of ground with proper technique.    They are NOT fast, but are exceedingly inexpensive to operate, and require only one man.  One bit will last a lifetime, and is built up with weld between or during drilling.  Most drillers have a pair and often spend time welding on one bit while the other is pounding away.   The clutch and brake setup can be adjusted so the machine drills merrily away while the operator kicks back between baling cycles.   Most water wells in this area were drilled with these machines until recent years, and range from 60' down to 800'.  It was not uncommon for a driller to leave a rig on a hole for weeks at a time, spending a day here and a day there working on it.   Without the labor of tripping in and tripping out, breaking down a long string of expensive drill stem, it's easy to drill when you have the time.   Fuel costs are trivial, and maintenance is minimal.  
                              I recently sold one, and have also partnered in a rotary.   The rotary gives the satisfaction of fast results, but at huge cost.  Bits at anywhere from $500 up, seldom last very many holes, and I've worn them out before finishing a hole.   Hundreds of gallons of fuel to run the rig and the compressor 800 CFM in our case.  
                              The cable tool uses a crankshaft assembly which drives the rocker that pulls down on the cable between the drum and the head of the rig, lifting the tool, and returns dropping it.  Head springs or rubber cushions at the top of the mast under the head block are an important detail.   It would not be difficult to build one of these from photos and drawings.   The derrick is simple, consisting of two pieces of channel iron with cross pieces between, and trussing......... not heavy or complex. 
                              If time is more important than cost....... a rotary is the way to go......... If cost matters, a cable tool can't be beaten.   My rig cost less than the price of having a rotary drill one well!!  And it will still be drilling wells when that rotary is melted down and part of the latest crop of Japanese cars...;-)

                                                                                      Howard

                          On 12/20/2012 07:25 PM, Pat Delany wrote:

                          How deep are the wells?

                          Pat


                          From: gachubah <gachubah@...>
                          To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Thursday, December 20, 2012 6:07 AM
                          Subject: [multimachine] Who Has The Multimachine in Africa?

                           
                          Dear All,

                          Just inquiring, who has this machine in Africa and in particular, in Kenya? I am interested in having a simple water drill made for me for my farm in Kenya.

                          Or, if one is built in the West, what is the cost?

                          Rgds

                          Gachuba








                        • Pat Delany
                          Thanks guys! When Jeremmy gets over his bouts of malaria and typhoid we will narrow down the problem. Pat ________________________________ From: T T
                          Message 12 of 16 , Dec 22, 2012
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Thanks guys!
                            When Jeremmy gets over his bouts of malaria and typhoid we will narrow down the problem.

                            Pat


                            From: T T <bellabok@...>
                            To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Saturday, December 22, 2012 1:28 AM
                            Subject: Re: [multimachine] Who Has The Multimachine in Africa?

                             
                            Hi! 

                            I have been researching on the web methods on how to drill and how to make the bits etc.

                            What intrigues me is that in various articles I have read they refer to drilling hundreds if not thousands of feet 

                            Keeping in mind they did have have steel casings in 1000 BC what did they do?
                            Regards.
                            Theo.

                            On 22 December 2012 07:49, StoneTool <owly@...> wrote:
                             
                            Larry:
                                Actually cable tool works fine in sand and gravel.  You start a piece of casing and the casing follows the drill right down.  With a rotary machine in those conditions some seriously heavy mud is required, and it then has to be cased. 
                                In drilling, knowing your geology is probably the most important thing........  Knowing what other people have hit in the area. 
                               
                                A fool repeats the same mistakes again and again.

                                A wise man learns from his mistakes

                                A successful man learns from the mistakes of others

                                                                                                                                        Howard



                            On 12/21/2012 05:38 PM, Larry Bentley wrote:
                            Howard is right the cable tool machine can drill just about anything and the EMAS videos on youtube and Vimeo show very basic low tech ways of using homemade tooling to drill water wells.  Now in some geology other drilling methods may be better but a cable tool will work, just may not be best.  The cable tool or precussion isn't great in sand along coastal areas, but lightweight rotary machines don't drill rock well where a cable tools does fine.  Different methods work well in different geology formations.
                             
                            Another good source to look at is http://wellspringafrica.org/    I've got a couple of friends actively involved in drilling water wells in West Africa and East Central Africa but it's a big place so can't tell if they are close enough to call on.
                             
                            His questions of what the local geology is and how deep the wells tend to be are important.  I have a friend who drilled in Kenya to 1000' (300 meters) and only got a deep post hole (dry well).  When I drilled in Benin, the wells were pretty shallow.  And in Uganda and Malawai I've seen some pretty shallow wells that produced very well.  So tell us where you are and what the local geology is (rock, sand, clay etc..) and we might can help some more with places to look for plans and methods.  I've got plenty of info and hand operated well pumps, but some countries have national chosen to support one type of pump or another so I can't say what is best for you yet.  Best pump is one where there is local parts support and folks who know how to fix it.  Everything  made by man breaks sooner or later, so repair has to be part of the planning.
                             
                             
                            Larry

                            Theo:
                                There is at least one set of "plans" on the web, as well as countless articles and photos.    I cannot imagine that in Africa there are not a number of these sitting around.  I would start by reading and researching on the internet.  Then searching the country around you for old rigs when you know what you are looking at.  Building any rig is an expensive proposition.   In this cases you need winches (as on all rigs), clutch assemblies to operate those winches, the derrick itself........ which can even be built from wood as in the old days.   You will need mainline cable which is left lay cable (opposite normal) so that it does not tend to unscrew the tools.   You will need a drill stem which is a solid shaft about 3" diameter and 16-20 feet long with a female thread on one end ("box") and a male thread on the other ("pin").  You will need a swivel assembly for the top which screws to the top of the drill stem, with a matching thread.  It will contain the cable which is inserted through the top, and then through a metal "thimble", flared out and poured full of hot babbitt inside the thimble.  The assembly slid together so that the thimble allows the cable to rotate when there is no weight on it during the brief moment when it hits bottom, before the cable snatches it back.  And you will need a bit or two.   You will also need to have casing drive blocks that clamp to flats on the drill stem, and of course "J wrenches" to break down your "drill string".   You will need a baler for bringing muck out of the well, and a fast winch to operate it.   You will also want an additional winch to handle casing and such tasks.   You will also of course need an engine with and out clutch.
                                The best thing of course is to find a complete rig, and ultimately it will be the least expensive in all probability.   You can of course purchase a rig and tooling overseas.    They are easy to install or remove from the truck or whatever they are mounted on.   Without the truck and without the derrick a rig would not be a large item to ship.   The tools are a very significant acquisition, and left lay cable may not be locally available.  Every part of a cable drilling rig could be locally built.   If I were in your shoes and had the time and money to build a rig from the ground up, I would probably use left hand thread on my stem and tools so I could use ordinary cable. 
                                It's a big project, and an expensive one............ but not compared to a rotary rig.    Start with Google........

                                                                                                        Howard

                            P.S.   I'm a relative neophyte........   It's best to find someone with far more experience to guide you.   Talk to local drillers.   You will want to know about ground conditions, formations, depth, and local techniques.

                            PPS   How many wells?   How deep?   What kind of ground?

                            On 12/20/2012 10:03 PM, T T wrote:
                            Hi!

                            I am from Africa and would like to build a cable tool drilling rig.

                            How would i go about it, plans etc.
                            Regards.
                            Theo.

                            On 21 December 2012 06:35, StoneTool  wrote:
                             
                                May I suggest a cable tool drilling rig.....  The cable tool, most commonly the Bucyrus Erie has been in existence far longer than the rotary, and is capable of drilling to great depth.   They do not require expensive rotary bits, compressors, mud pumps, etc.   The tool string consists of a single drill stem (solid), with a rather large solid bit in a more or less figure 8 shape with a swivel at the top of the drill stem.  It is attached to a cable and a rocker assembly lifts and drops the bit.  Each time it rotates slightly.  A baler on a high speed winch lifts the cuttings out of the hole.  A fairly small amount of water is used to create a slurry which can be easily baled out.  They will drill in any type of ground with proper technique.    They are NOT fast, but are exceedingly inexpensive to operate, and require only one man.  One bit will last a lifetime, and is built up with weld between or during drilling.  Most drillers have a pair and often spend time welding on one bit while the other is pounding away.   The clutch and brake setup can be adjusted so the machine drills merrily away while the operator kicks back between baling cycles.   Most water wells in this area were drilled with these machines until recent years, and range from 60' down to 800'.  It was not uncommon for a driller to leave a rig on a hole for weeks at a time, spending a day here and a day there working on it.   Without the labor of tripping in and tripping out, breaking down a long string of expensive drill stem, it's easy to drill when you have the time.   Fuel costs are trivial, and maintenance is minimal.  
                                I recently sold one, and have also partnered in a rotary.   The rotary gives the satisfaction of fast results, but at huge cost.  Bits at anywhere from $500 up, seldom last very many holes, and I've worn them out before finishing a hole.   Hundreds of gallons of fuel to run the rig and the compressor 800 CFM in our case.  
                                The cable tool uses a crankshaft assembly which drives the rocker that pulls down on the cable between the drum and the head of the rig, lifting the tool, and returns dropping it.  Head springs or rubber cushions at the top of the mast under the head block are an important detail.   It would not be difficult to build one of these from photos and drawings.   The derrick is simple, consisting of two pieces of channel iron with cross pieces between, and trussing......... not heavy or complex. 
                                If time is more important than cost....... a rotary is the way to go......... If cost matters, a cable tool can't be beaten.   My rig cost less than the price of having a rotary drill one well!!  And it will still be drilling wells when that rotary is melted down and part of the latest crop of Japanese cars...;-)

                                                                                        Howard

                            On 12/20/2012 07:25 PM, Pat Delany wrote:
                            How deep are the wells?

                            Pat


                            From: gachubah <gachubah@...>
                            To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Thursday, December 20, 2012 6:07 AM
                            Subject: [multimachine] Who Has The Multimachine in Africa?

                             
                            Dear All,

                            Just inquiring, who has this machine in Africa and in particular, in Kenya? I am interested in having a simple water drill made for me for my farm in Kenya.

                            Or, if one is built in the West, what is the cost?

                            Rgds

                            Gachuba










                          • Shannon DeWolfe
                            I followed the link to wellspringafrica.org in a post by Larry Bentley. (Thank you, Larry!) I have wondered why attempts to help poor people consist of
                            Message 13 of 16 , Dec 22, 2012
                            • 0 Attachment
                              I followed the link to wellspringafrica.org in a post by Larry Bentley.
                              (Thank you, Larry!)

                              I have wondered why attempts to help poor people consist of volunteers
                              descending on a village to build a latrine, a school, a well, or
                              fill-in-the-blank, pat themselves on the back and say, "good-bye
                              village". I know that many people are committed to making things better
                              for others. Some have made it their life's work. I recognize and
                              appreciate their dedication. But, virtually every report I've read shows
                              that precious little research is done into the dynamics of the local
                              social structure. Few organizations (and even fewer politicians) think
                              about what is going to happen after the volunteers leave or the
                              government officials return to the capitol. Where is the consideration
                              for the realities of life and unintended consequences? I direct your
                              attention to this PDF document:

                              http://www.consallen.com/handpumps/One_well_is_no_use.pdf

                              Pay particular attention to the story of the well in Uganda. Profit is a
                              strong incentive.

                              Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
                              --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 56 year old fat man.

                              On 12/21/2012 6:38 PM, Larry Bentley wrote:
                              >
                              > Howard is right the cable tool machine can drill just about anything
                              > and the EMAS videos on youtube and Vimeo show very basic low tech ways
                              > of using homemade tooling to drill water wells.
                            • David G. LeVine
                              ... Copper, brass and bronzes were common at that time. Hard copper runs Rockwell F of 87, and strengths of 48 KSI. High strength aluminum bronzes run Brinell
                              Message 14 of 16 , Dec 22, 2012
                              • 0 Attachment
                                On 12/22/2012 12:13 PM, Pat Delany wrote:
                                Keeping in mind they did have have steel casings in 1000 BC what did they do?

                                Copper, brass and bronzes were common at that time. 

                                Hard copper runs Rockwell F of 87, and strengths of 48 KSI.

                                High strength aluminum bronzes run Brinell hardness of 190 and tensile strengths of 95 KSI.  However, aluminum was rare and more valuable than gold. 

                                In comparison, steel (1018 CRS) runs Rockwell B of 71 and and tensile strengths of 68 KSI.  To get similar properties, one would need tool steels!  O1 tool steel runs Rockwell C 55-65.  O1 tensile strengths are not well documented, but should be in the >80KSI range, IIRC.  Due to hardening and tempering differences, different tempers of O1 will have VERY different properties.

                                "Naval bronze" tend to be pretty corrosion resistant, run Rockwell B hardness of 75 and 45 KSI tensile strengths.  "Gun metal bronzes" have no aluminum (aluminum was a rarity in that era) and run Brinell hardness of 74 and 45 KSI tensile strengths.

                                For comparison, gray cast iron runs 25-40 KSI tensile strength and BNH of 140-280 (roughly.)  It is harder, but weaker.

                                As to pipes, the Romans used LEAD or lead alloys!  It is easy to work and they didn't know about lead poisoning.  Not recommended today!  Copper is an option, of course, and work hardened copper is pretty good.

                                Does that help to confuse things?

                                Dave  8{)

                                --

                                "The first method for estimating the intelligence of a ruler is to look at the men he has around him."
                                Niccolo Machiavelli

                                NOTE TO ALL:

                                When forwarding emails, please use only "Blind Carbon Copy" or "Bcc" for all recipients. Please "delete" or "highlight & cut" any forwarding history which includes my email address! It is a courtesy to me and others who may not wish to have their email addresses sent all over the world! Erasing the history helps prevent Spammers from mining addresses and viruses from being propagated.


                                THANK YOU!
                              • Pat Delany
                                Shannon I could not agree more. The only way projects work over the long run is if someone has a financial stake in it. The MM changed from a hobby project to
                                Message 15 of 16 , Dec 23, 2012
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  Shannon
                                  I could not agree more. The only way projects work over the long run is if someone has a financial stake in it. The MM changed from a hobby project to a "real" project when several missionaries suggested using the machine as a way to give added income to water pump repair people.

                                  Pat









                                  From: Shannon DeWolfe <sdewolfe@...>
                                  To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Saturday, December 22, 2012 12:30 PM
                                  Subject: [multimachine] Was: Who Has The Multimachine in Africa? Now: Wells in Africa

                                  I followed the link to wellspringafrica.org in a post by Larry Bentley.
                                  (Thank you, Larry!)

                                  I have wondered why attempts to help poor people consist of volunteers
                                  descending on a village to build a latrine, a school, a well, or
                                  fill-in-the-blank, pat themselves on the back and say, "good-bye
                                  village". I know that many people are committed to making things better
                                  for others. Some have made it their life's work. I recognize and
                                  appreciate their dedication. But, virtually every report I've read shows
                                  that precious little research is done into the dynamics of the local
                                  social structure. Few organizations (and even fewer politicians) think
                                  about what is going to happen after the volunteers leave or the
                                  government officials return to the capitol. Where is the consideration
                                  for the realities of life and unintended consequences? I direct your
                                  attention to this PDF document:

                                  http://www.consallen.com/handpumps/One_well_is_no_use.pdf

                                  Pay particular attention to the story of the well in Uganda. Profit is a
                                  strong incentive.

                                  Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
                                  --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 56 year old fat man.

                                  On 12/21/2012 6:38 PM, Larry Bentley wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Howard is right the cable tool machine can drill just about anything
                                  > and the EMAS videos on youtube and Vimeo show very basic low tech ways
                                  > of using homemade tooling to drill water wells.



                                  ------------------------------------

                                  -------------
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                                  Also visit the Joseph V. Romig group for even more concrete tool construction, shop notes, stories, and wisdom from the early 20th Century.
                                  http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/romig_designs/
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                                • oldhermit
                                  Shannon, That was fascinating. Harold
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Dec 24, 2012
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    Shannon,
                                    That was fascinating.
                                    Harold

                                    --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Shannon DeWolfe <sdewolfe@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > OK, now I'm running late!
                                    >
                                    > http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&v=nYNQt36VayM&NR=1
                                    >
                                    > Regards,
                                    >
                                    > Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
                                    > --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 56 year old fat man.
                                    >
                                    > On 12/20/2012 11:03 PM, T T wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > Hi!
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > I am from Africa and would like to build a cable tool drilling rig.
                                    >
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