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a small milling attachment for the lathe

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  • Shannon DeWolfe
    Howdy all, While we wait for Pat to get home and report on his adventure to NYC, I thought I would share this little milling attachment. I was reading one of
    Message 1 of 23 , Oct 2, 2012
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      Howdy all,

      While we wait for Pat to get home and report on his adventure to NYC, I
      thought I would share this little milling attachment. I was reading one
      of the books that Charles Mitchard sent to me (thank you so much,
      Charles). There was a reference to the "Abwood" milling attachment.
      Abwood is a name I had not encountered before now. A quick search lead
      me directly to Lathes.co.uk. On the page about the Abwood was reference
      to another milling attachment made for Myford lathes that looks to me
      like something that can be made without castings:

      http://www.lathes.co.uk/myford/page18.html

      Anyone have any idea on how it is driven? Bevel gears?

      L. W. Staines are apparently still in business; there are dozens of
      business directory entries for them. But, if they have a web site it
      must never get a hit because I couldn't find it even going ten pages
      deep into a Google search.

      Regards,

      --
      Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
      --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 56 year old fat man.
    • Pierre Coueffin
      If I were to guess, I d say that there are round belts running inside the column. They ll run around a corner easily.
      Message 2 of 23 , Oct 2, 2012
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        If I were to guess, I'd say that there are round belts running inside the column.  They'll run around a corner easily.
      • Bruce Bellows
        Yeah round belts will go around the corner easily however they might not be able the transmit the necessary torque to drive the head as a cutter. A cogged belt
        Message 3 of 23 , Oct 3, 2012
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          Yeah round belts will go around the corner easily however they might not be able the transmit the necessary torque to drive the head as a cutter. A cogged belt could drive the upper shaft.

          Bruce

        • Pierre Coueffin
          It does not necessarily require a lot of power to drive an endmill. That milling attachment does not look much more rigid than my Sherline mill, and it only
          Message 4 of 23 , Oct 3, 2012
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            It does not necessarily require a lot of power to drive an endmill.  That milling attachment does not look much more rigid than my Sherline mill, and it only has about a half horse motor on it.  I've never stalled it or slipped the belt while running an endmill or a flycutter.

            I've stalled the motor on my sherline lathe often enough, but only while running the variable speed very slowly, which probably only gives the motor about 20% of its rated input power...

            On Wed, Oct 3, 2012 at 5:10 AM, Bruce Bellows <bbellows@...> wrote:

            Yeah round belts will go around the corner easily however they might not be able the transmit the necessary torque to drive the head as a cutter. A cogged belt could drive the upper shaft.

          • Chris Tofu
            if I were to implement a milling attachment (the usage varies widely), I wouldn t run it off of the lathe s spindle. If only in my mind there s the
            Message 5 of 23 , Oct 3, 2012
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              if I were to implement a milling "attachment" (the usage varies widely), I wouldn't run it off of the lathe's spindle. If only in my mind there's the possibility of putting undo stresses on the bearings (due to misalignment). I'm not an engineer, so maybe I should shut my trap, but I don't like it dag nab it! I'd have another motor, inverted and attached to the side more then likely of the milling head. Some have them on top (my EMCO F1 for instance). DC is much preferable to AC for a multitude of reasons.
               The simplest scheme for a milling head (we all love simple, right?), whether to be used w/it's own table or integrated w/a lathe, is to utilize either round bar or square bar even for the column. Using square would be much less labor intensive (you don't have to bore that big hole to admit the column in the milling head itself), but that's what machines are for. Oh but you may not have a big old Bridgeport to bore something that large. Some sort of rectangular stock for the head proper. We're talking kind of heavy though...
               I suppose that since we have a lathe, we could plop the milling head on top of the crosslide and bore out the column receptacle. You can take 20,000,000 light cuts if necessary. But then you need to mill a channel in the whole length of the column (a keyway of sorts), or figure out some way of attaching keystock to the length of the column, and mill the keyway in the milling head (awkward), which would require a broaching operation.
               I don't know, what do you all think?
            • Pierre Coueffin
              I ve long been an advocate of milling attachments like the quick-step or versamill stuff. I would not be concerned about damaging the bearings in the lathe,
              Message 6 of 23 , Oct 3, 2012
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                I've long been an advocate of milling attachments like the quick-step or versamill stuff.  I would not be concerned about damaging the bearings in the lathe, since they're overbuilt to handle the oddly angled loads and interrupted cut hammering action of lathe work.  If you were concerned about it, you'd rob a CV joint from a car to connect the two parts.

                The reason I want an independent motor is so that I can cut complex features on a part held in the lathe chuck.  Indexing a lathe that has changewheels is very easy, and cutting splined shafts and keyways makes your machine much more versatile.


                If you want to build an attachment that mounts to the cross-slide and cuts parts that are bolted to the saddle, I think that it would be better to build a table that mounts to the saddle, and has T-slots at the same height and spacing as the real saddle.  Mount an independently powered milling spindle on that slide, and you can do everything the Rodney or Big Swing can, but you have a bunch more options as well...  I'd be tempted to put the milling spindle on the tailstock end of the lathe, just because that end typically has less wear on the ways.  Might as well even it out.
              • Chris Tofu
                personally though I favor a milling machine w/it s own table. A lot of the methods explored over the past couple years I guess (since the multimachine became a
                Message 7 of 23 , Oct 3, 2012
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                  personally though I favor a milling machine w/it's own table. A lot of the methods explored over the past couple years I guess (since the multimachine became a lathe resembling a small Prazi and others) assume limitations in materials and procedures, which is fine. But you don't have to rule out castings, using commercial stock, aluminum (not always a horrendous idea). Casting would be a neat sub topic to this group. There are lots of casting groups already, but *easy* casting isn't necessarily explored. Just to throw things out, like pre-heating metal w/a resistance coil (kanthal), and finishing it off w/gas (to avoid huge gas canisters), utilizing thermite, etc. Thinking outside the box type stuff.
                • louis richardson
                  just get a small bench top drill press,bolt it to lathe ways and use it as mill ,bolt or clamp work piece to crossslide or compund .getting accurate depth of
                  Message 8 of 23 , Oct 3, 2012
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                    just get a small bench top drill press,bolt it to lathe ways and use it as mill ,bolt or clamp work piece to crossslide or compund .getting accurate depth of cut wont be easy ,but it can be done.
                  • Pierre Coueffin
                    I don t like the way that the chuck is fastened to a cheap drill press for milling. You really want a through-hole in the spindle and a draw-bar. Side thrust
                    Message 9 of 23 , Oct 3, 2012
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                      I don't like the way that the chuck is fastened to a cheap drill press for milling.  You really want a through-hole in the spindle and a draw-bar.  Side thrust will dislodge a Jacob's Taper in short order, and a flying endmill is no fun at all.

                      On Wed, Oct 3, 2012 at 4:06 PM, louis richardson <louisrfnauto@...> wrote:

                      just get a small bench top drill press,bolt it to lathe ways and use it as mill ,bolt or clamp work piece to crossslide or compund .getting accurate depth of cut wont be easy ,but it can be done.

                    • louis richardson
                      yes this is correct, i forgot to ad it , most people know this when making a milling machine a drawbar must be in the design.i have done this once , it can be
                      Message 10 of 23 , Oct 3, 2012
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                        yes this is correct, i forgot to ad it , most people know this when making a milling machine a drawbar must be in the design.i have done this once , it can be done with simple hand tools but is time consuming and will try your patience.

                        --- On Wed, 10/3/12, Pierre Coueffin <pcoueffin@...> wrote:

                        From: Pierre Coueffin <pcoueffin@...>
                        Subject: Re: [multimachine] a small milling attachment for the lathe
                        To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                        Date: Wednesday, October 3, 2012, 6:18 PM

                         
                        I don't like the way that the chuck is fastened to a cheap drill press for milling.  You really want a through-hole in the spindle and a draw-bar.  Side thrust will dislodge a Jacob's Taper in short order, and a flying endmill is no fun at all.

                        On Wed, Oct 3, 2012 at 4:06 PM, louis richardson <louisrfnauto@...> wrote:
                        just get a small bench top drill press,bolt it to lathe ways and use it as mill ,bolt or clamp work piece to crossslide or compund .getting accurate depth of cut wont be easy ,but it can be done.
                      • Pierre Coueffin
                        How did you manage to drill through the quill for a drawbar? I thought about using a drill press as a mill for years, but this was my big stumbling block. If
                        Message 11 of 23 , Oct 3, 2012
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                          How did you manage to drill through the quill for a drawbar?  I thought about using a drill press as a mill for years, but this was my big stumbling block.
                          If I were trying to mill with a drill press today, I'd try one of these techniques:
                           
                          On Wed, Oct 3, 2012 at 8:08 PM, louis richardson <louisrfnauto@...> wrote:
                           

                          yes this is correct, i forgot to ad it , most people know this when making a milling machine a drawbar must be in the design.i have done this once , it can be done with simple hand tools but is time consuming and will try your patience.

                          --- On Wed, 10/3/12, Pierre Coueffin <pcoueffin@...> wrote:

                          From: Pierre Coueffin <pcoueffin@...>
                          Subject: Re: [multimachine] a small milling attachment for the lathe
                          To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Wednesday, October 3, 2012, 6:18 PM


                           
                          I don't like the way that the chuck is fastened to a cheap drill press for milling.  You really want a through-hole in the spindle and a draw-bar.  Side thrust will dislodge a Jacob's Taper in short order, and a flying endmill is no fun at all.

                          On Wed, Oct 3, 2012 at 4:06 PM, louis richardson <louisrfnauto@...> wrote:
                          just get a small bench top drill press,bolt it to lathe ways and use it as mill ,bolt or clamp work piece to crossslide or compund .getting accurate depth of cut wont be easy ,but it can be done.


                        • louisrfnauto
                          first you take drill press apart, then using 12 long 1/4 or 5/15 ,3/8 drill in a hand held electric drill you drill in to shaft from both ends , the drill
                          Message 12 of 23 , Oct 3, 2012
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                            first you take drill press apart, then using 12" long 1/4 or 5/15 ,3/8 drill in a hand held electric drill you drill in to shaft from both ends , the drill press i used was a large floor mounted model rescued from scrap pile,shaft was about 1" dia,regardless of size all i have looked at have had center hole in top,and drilling in other end, if this is too much for some one or they cant get a long drill bit, try drilling and taping in the chuck end and then install threaded stock and then drill and tap end of chuck so that chuck screws up into tapered hole and tightens up. this does mean that drill/mill can operate only one way so as to continually tighten .i have seen those chuck supports in thoses old mags before and i dont know if they will work or not,but if your a real machinist like me ,you WILL find a way to do without it, its just a crutch.if you have to ,you can take stripped drill press shaft to a machine shop and they will drill a hole all the way through for you,might be better than scrapping a good drill press.it just depends on your tools and skill level.
                            --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Pierre Coueffin <pcoueffin@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > How did you manage to drill through the quill for a drawbar? I thought
                            > about using a drill press as a mill for years, but this was my big
                            > stumbling block.
                            > If I were trying to mill with a drill press today, I'd try one of these
                            > techniques:
                            > http://books.google.ca/books?id=AuADAAAAMBAJ&lpg=PA191&pg=PA191#v=onepage&q&f=true
                            > http://books.google.ca/books?id=HNgDAAAAMBAJ&lpg=PA180&pg=PA180#v=onepage&q&f=false
                            >
                            > On Wed, Oct 3, 2012 at 8:08 PM, louis richardson <louisrfnauto@...>wrote:
                            >
                            > > **
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > yes this is correct, i forgot to ad it , most people know this when making
                            > > a milling machine a drawbar must be in the design.i have done this once ,
                            > > it can be done with simple hand tools but is time consuming and will try
                            > > your patience.
                            > >
                            > > --- On *Wed, 10/3/12, Pierre Coueffin <pcoueffin@...>* wrote:
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > From: Pierre Coueffin <pcoueffin@...>
                            > > Subject: Re: [multimachine] a small milling attachment for the lathe
                            > > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                            > > Date: Wednesday, October 3, 2012, 6:18 PM
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > I don't like the way that the chuck is fastened to a cheap drill press for
                            > > milling. You really want a through-hole in the spindle and a draw-bar.
                            > > Side thrust will dislodge a Jacob's Taper in short order, and a flying
                            > > endmill is no fun at all.
                            > >
                            > > On Wed, Oct 3, 2012 at 4:06 PM, louis richardson <louisrfnauto@...<http://us.mc1405.mail.yahoo.com/mc/compose?to=louisrfnauto@...>
                            > > > wrote:
                            > >
                            > > **
                            > > just get a small bench top drill press,bolt it to lathe ways and use it
                            > > as mill ,bolt or clamp work piece to crossslide or compund .getting
                            > > accurate depth of cut wont be easy ,but it can be done.
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            >
                          • David G. LeVine
                            ... I think a Woodruff key in the pulley eliminates the need for a full length key in the shaft. But why would you need it at all. Look at the cheap Chinese
                            Message 13 of 23 , Oct 4, 2012
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                              On 10/03/2012 05:35 PM, Chris Tofu wrote:
                              if I were to implement a milling "attachment" (the usage varies widely), I wouldn't run it off of the lathe's spindle. If only in my mind there's the possibility of putting undo stresses on the bearings (due to misalignment). I'm not an engineer, so maybe I should shut my trap, but I don't like it dag nab it! I'd have another motor, inverted and attached to the side more then likely of the milling head. Some have them on top (my EMCO F1 for instance). DC is much preferable to AC for a multitude of reasons.
                               The simplest scheme for a milling head (we all love simple, right?), whether to be used w/it's own table or integrated w/a lathe, is to utilize either round bar or square bar even for the column. Using square would be much less labor intensive (you don't have to bore that big hole to admit the column in the milling head itself), but that's what machines are for. Oh but you may not have a big old Bridgeport to bore something that large. Some sort of rectangular stock for the head proper. We're talking kind of heavy though...
                               I suppose that since we have a lathe, we could plop the milling head on top of the crosslide and bore out the column receptacle. You can take 20,000,000 light cuts if necessary. But then you need to mill a channel in the whole length of the column (a keyway of sorts), or figure out some way of attaching keystock to the length of the column, and mill the keyway in the milling head (awkward), which would require a broaching operation.
                               I don't know, what do you all think?

                              I think a Woodruff key in the pulley eliminates the need for a full length key in the shaft.

                              But why would you need it at all.  Look at the cheap Chinese mills, the whole head moves, there is NO quill at all.

                              Dave  8{)
                              --

                              "The first method for estimating the intelligence of a ruler is to look at the men he has around him."
                              Niccolo Machiavelli

                              NOTE TO ALL:

                              When forwarding emails, please use only "Blind Carbon Copy" or "Bcc" for all recipients. Please "delete" or "highlight & cut" any forwarding history which includes my email address! It is a courtesy to me and others who may not wish to have their email addresses sent all over the world! Erasing the history helps prevent Spammers from mining addresses and viruses from being propagated.


                              THANK YOU!
                            • Chris Tofu
                              ________________________________ From: Pierre Coueffin   I don t like the way that the chuck is fastened to a cheap drill press for
                              Message 14 of 23 , Oct 4, 2012
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                                From: Pierre Coueffin <pcoueffin@...>


                                 
                                I don't like the way that the chuck is fastened to a cheap drill press for milling.  You really want a through-hole in the spindle and a draw-bar.  Side thrust will dislodge a Jacob's Taper in short order, and a flying endmill is no fun at all.
                                C: Apparently for ultra lite milling, it can be done. I know a number of people who have successfully milled w/a drill press. But no not for heavy milling. Rudy Kouhoupt has a video on youtube on this subject (he's dead, but not on account of this unorthodox approaches).
                              • Chris Tofu
                                if you use a round column, you need to stop the head from rotating. ________________________________ From: David G. LeVine I think a
                                Message 15 of 23 , Oct 4, 2012
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                                  if you use a round column, you need to stop the head from rotating.


                                  From: David G. LeVine <dlevine@...>

                                  I think a Woodruff key in the pulley eliminates the need for a full length key in the shaft.

                                  But why would you need it at all.  Look at the cheap Chinese mills, the whole head moves, there is NO quill at all.

                                  Dave  8{)
                                • Ian Newman
                                  Hi,   There is another issue - the drill bearings.  A drill is not designed for side trust and you will kill the bearings pretty quickly unless you first
                                  Message 16 of 23 , Oct 4, 2012
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                                    Hi,
                                     
                                    There is another issue - the drill bearings.  A drill is not designed for side trust and you will kill the bearings pretty quickly unless you first replace them with races of a more suitable design.
                                     
                                    All the best,
                                    Ian

                                    --- On Thu, 4/10/12, Chris Tofu <rampaginggreenhulk@...> wrote:

                                    From: Chris Tofu <rampaginggreenhulk@...>
                                    Subject: Re: [multimachine] a small milling attachment for the lathe
                                    To: "multimachine@yahoogroups.com" <multimachine@yahoogroups.com>
                                    Date: Thursday, 4 October, 2012, 18:13

                                     



                                    From: Pierre Coueffin <pcoueffin@...>


                                     
                                    I don't like the way that the chuck is fastened to a cheap drill press for milling.  You really want a through-hole in the spindle and a draw-bar.  Side thrust will dislodge a Jacob's Taper in short order, and a flying endmill is no fun at all.
                                    C: Apparently for ultra lite milling, it can be done. I know a number of people who have successfully milled w/a drill press. But no not for heavy milling. Rudy Kouhoupt has a video on youtube on this subject (he's dead, but not on account of this unorthodox approaches).
                                  • David G. LeVine
                                    ... If you use a square column, it is not an issue. Square ERW tubing in something like 3 square with a 1/4 wall filled with E/G with a hollow in the middle
                                    Message 17 of 23 , Oct 4, 2012
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                                      On 10/04/2012 01:19 PM, Chris Tofu wrote:
                                      if you use a round column, you need to stop the head from rotating.

                                      If you use a square column, it is not an issue.  Square ERW tubing in something like 3" square with a 1/4" wall filled with E/G with a hollow in the middle will be strong and dead, the E/G will damp out steel vibrations.  The lift mechanism can go into the hollow, protecting it and giving force in the center.  Either a gib setup or rolling bearings on eccentrics can locate the head.

                                      Dave  8{)

                                      --

                                      "The first method for estimating the intelligence of a ruler is to look at the men he has around him."
                                      Niccolo Machiavelli

                                      NOTE TO ALL:

                                      When forwarding emails, please use only "Blind Carbon Copy" or "Bcc" for all recipients. Please "delete" or "highlight & cut" any forwarding history which includes my email address! It is a courtesy to me and others who may not wish to have their email addresses sent all over the world! Erasing the history helps prevent Spammers from mining addresses and viruses from being propagated.


                                      THANK YOU!
                                    • Arthur Nascimento
                                      *I saw an article where the commom ball bearings are changed by conical bearings.* *Arthur* 2012/10/4 Ian Newman
                                      Message 18 of 23 , Oct 5, 2012
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                                        I saw an article  where the commom ball bearings are changed by conical bearings.
                                        Arthur

                                        2012/10/4 Ian Newman <ian_new@...>


                                        Hi,
                                         
                                        There is another issue - the drill bearings.  A drill is not designed for side trust and you will kill the bearings pretty quickly unless you first replace them with races of a more suitable design.
                                         
                                        All the best,
                                        Ian

                                        --- On Thu, 4/10/12, Chris Tofu <rampaginggreenhulk@...> wrote:

                                        From: Chris Tofu <rampaginggreenhulk@...>

                                        Subject: Re: [multimachine] a small milling attachment for the lathe
                                        To: "multimachine@yahoogroups.com" <multimachine@yahoogroups.com>
                                        Date: Thursday, 4 October, 2012, 18:13


                                         



                                        From: Pierre Coueffin <pcoueffin@...>


                                         
                                        I don't like the way that the chuck is fastened to a cheap drill press for milling.  You really want a through-hole in the spindle and a draw-bar.  Side thrust will dislodge a Jacob's Taper in short order, and a flying endmill is no fun at all.
                                        C: Apparently for ultra lite milling, it can be done. I know a number of people who have successfully milled w/a drill press. But no not for heavy milling. Rudy Kouhoupt has a video on youtube on this subject (he's dead, but not on account of this unorthodox approaches).



                                      • keith gutshall
                                        Hi Guys  The question is ,Can ball bearings be used for a milling machine spindle?    Keith Deep Run Portage Back Shop The Lizard Works
                                        Message 19 of 23 , Oct 5, 2012
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                                          Hi Guys
                                           The question is ,Can ball bearings be used for a milling machine spindle?
                                           
                                           Keith
                                           
                                          Deep Run Portage
                                          Back Shop
                                          " The Lizard Works"
                                          From: Arthur Nascimento <scientia2016@...>
                                          To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                                          Sent: Friday, October 5, 2012 9:32 AM
                                          Subject: Re: [multimachine] a small milling attachment for the lathe
                                           
                                          I saw an article  where the commom ball bearings are changed by conical bearings.
                                          Arthur
                                          2012/10/4 Ian Newman <ian_new@...>
                                          Hi,
                                           
                                          There is another issue - the drill bearings.  A drill is not designed for side trust and you will kill the bearings pretty quickly unless you first replace them with races of a more suitable design.
                                           
                                          All the best,
                                          Ian --- On Thu, 4/10/12, Chris Tofu <rampaginggreenhulk@...> wrote:

                                          From: Chris Tofu <rampaginggreenhulk@...>
                                          Subject: Re: [multimachine] a small milling attachment for the lathe
                                          To: "multimachine@yahoogroups.com" <multimachine@yahoogroups.com>
                                          Date: Thursday, 4 October, 2012, 18:13
                                           

                                          From: Pierre Coueffin <pcoueffin@...>
                                           
                                          I don't like the way that the chuck is fastened to a cheap drill press for milling.  You really want a through-hole in the spindle and a draw-bar.  Side thrust will dislodge a Jacob's Taper in short order, and a flying endmill is no fun at all.
                                          C: Apparently for ultra lite milling, it can be done. I know a number of people who have successfully milled w/a drill press. But no not for heavy milling. Rudy Kouhoupt has a video on youtube on this subject (he's dead, but not on account of this unorthodox approaches).
                                        • Chris Tofu
                                          ball or roller bearings of proper rating are used on all milling machines, saving the older kind that use bronze or steel bearings. The issue is to use the
                                          Message 20 of 23 , Oct 5, 2012
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                                            ball or roller bearings of proper rating are used on all milling machines, saving the older kind that use bronze or steel bearings. The issue is to use the proper bearing though. As pointed out drill press bearings are not suitable but for the most lite milling jobs. The biggest problem with producing an accurate bore in a piece of steel, iron, aluminum, etc. is producing an accurate bore in the piece of steel, iron, aluminum, etc. You're working w/.0001"s here ("tenths"). You need a machine w/a great deal of accuracy, and an operator with an eye for accuracy. Or possibly bore oversize and use some sort of polishing operation to bring the bore into tolerance.
                                             Other methods can be explored, like casting an aluminum head around a steel shaft. Iffy. But there are bound to be other ways of pulling it off (and in the case of a solid steel core, it would take a good deal of force to pull it off, sorry for the pun :p)


                                            From: keith gutshall <drpshops@...>

                                             
                                            Hi Guys
                                             The question is ,Can ball bearings be used for a milling machine spindle?
                                             
                                             Keith
                                          • oldstudentmsgt
                                            The answer is Yes, but they probably won t last very long. Especially if you do a lot of heavy milling. If it s a once in a while thing and you don t take
                                            Message 21 of 23 , Oct 5, 2012
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                                              The answer is "Yes, but they probably won't last very long."

                                              Especially if you do a lot of heavy milling. If it's a 'once in a while thing' and you don't take deep cuts, you can do it with the stock bearings.

                                              Goggling "Popular Mechanics drill press mill" at http://books.google.com/books will give you a number of articles on folks who did so successfully.

                                              I'm in the middle of repairing my old Craftsman drill press, and am seriously considering upgrading the bearing to at least angular-contact types, as are used in upgrading the bearings of mini-lathes. Don't hold your breath waiting, I'm afraid. It keeps getting pushed to the back of the burner for IRL problems. Mama and the kids seem to want me to to keep working for $$ so I can feed them and the pets, among other things. ;)

                                              Bill in OKC

                                              --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, keith gutshall <drpshops@...> wrote:
                                              >
                                              > Hi Guys
                                              >  The question is ,Can ball bearings be used for a milling machine spindle?
                                              >  
                                              >  Keith
                                              >
                                              > Deep Run Portage
                                              > Back Shop
                                              > " The Lizard Works"
                                              >
                                              >
                                              > ________________________________
                                              > From: Arthur Nascimento <scientia2016@...>
                                              > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                                              > Sent: Friday, October 5, 2012 9:32 AM
                                              > Subject: Re: [multimachine] a small milling attachment for the lathe
                                              >
                                              >  
                                              > I saw an article  where the commom ball bearings are changed by conical bearings.
                                              SNIP!
                                            • David G. LeVine
                                              ... Yes, but... Some ball bearings (like the 7000 series) are angular contact bearings and will work, but look at the cost vs. electric motor bearings and you
                                              Message 22 of 23 , Oct 5, 2012
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                                                On 10/05/2012 02:10 PM, keith gutshall wrote:

                                                Hi Guys
                                                 The question is ,Can ball bearings be used for a milling machine spindle?
                                                 
                                                 Keith

                                                Yes, but...

                                                Some ball bearings (like the 7000 series) are angular contact bearings and will work, but look at the cost vs. electric motor bearings and you will see why they are not used.

                                                Dave  8{)

                                                --

                                                "The first method for estimating the intelligence of a ruler is to look at the men he has around him."
                                                Niccolo Machiavelli

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                                                THANK YOU!
                                              • Bruce Bellows
                                                Keith Yes ball bearings can be used when they are angular contact type. Also single bearing units are not to be used where only a radial load is present as
                                                Message 23 of 23 , Oct 8, 2012
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                                                  Keith
                                                  Yes ball bearings can be used when they are angular contact type. Also single bearing units are not to be used where only a radial load is present as they are designed to need a thrust load and when there is a 2 directional thrust load a duplex arrangement is required.
                                                  Even though an angular contact bearing will be higher in cost than the same size deep groove ball bearing the biggest factor that determines price is the precision class that is chosen. An ABEC 5 or 7 bearing can be 10 times more expensive than an ABEC 1 precision class.

                                                  Bruce

                                                  On 10/5/2012 2:10 PM, keith gutshall wrote:  
                                                  Hi Guys
                                                   The question is ,Can ball bearings be used for a milling machine spindle?
                                                   
                                                   Keith
                                                   

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