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Re: [multimachine] A truck brake, clutch and driveshaft repair machine.

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  • Shannon DeWolfe
    Pat and all, I ve been thinking about the fellow in Mexico who needs a brake lathe. I think he would be better served to build a dedicated brake lathe and use
    Message 1 of 13 , Jun 24, 2012
    Pat and all,

    I've been thinking about the fellow in Mexico who needs a brake lathe. I
    think he would be better served to build a dedicated brake lathe and use
    the MMConcrete lathe for his other work. Let me know what you think
    about the drawing attached.

    Basically the lathe consists of two engine blocks mounted so the head
    surfaces are facing one another. The spindle is held in place by the
    trapezoidal pieces shown on the right hand block. (The drawing was
    getting too busy so I only show the tapered collars on the right side,
    but four are required and they must have bearings sized to the spindle.)
    To mount the drum, the flywheel with ring gear is removed, the tapered
    collar/bearing inside the left block is removed and the entire spindle
    is slid to the right enough to admit the drum. The spindle is then
    reassembled and the drum is bolted to the flywheel between the two
    blocks. That flywheel is mounted to a collar that clamps to the spindle
    at any place between the two blocks necessary. The drum is moved as
    close to the left block as is practical and is clamped there. The
    cutting tool is mounted to the Romig slide as shown, the slide is
    mounted to a riser to bring the tool to the cutting plane, and the riser
    is mounted to the front face of the engine.

    The flywheel with ring gear is driven by a starter pinion gear mounted
    to a step-down pulley to achieve slow rotation with a standard single
    phase motor. The gearing can be calculated easily enough. The starter
    pinion and ring gear will give somewhere around 18:1. The actual tooth
    count will dictate the exact number. Pulleys are then chosen to achieve
    the slow rotation necessary. What would it be? 20 or 30 RPM? I don't know.

    Great care in alignment is, of course, necessary. My first idea was to
    use another pipe to mount the cutting tool in another bore. That would
    ensure that the tool and the drum are on the same plane. I could not
    think of a way to do that. The round bed lathes had an internal threaded
    rod that advanced the carriage, that might work. The pipe in the bottom
    hole will ensure that the two blocks always face squarely to one another
    even under load ... I think.

    This is strictly a manual machine and will tie-up at least one man for
    the duration of the job. With some ingeninuity that I can't seem to
    muster, it might be automated so it could be setup and left to run until
    a kill switch is activated.

    Improvements? One thing I recognize immediately is that the bearing
    arrangement is unworkable, sliding the spindle out and back in
    repeatedly introduces too much play. There are more than 6500 people
    subscribed here. Someone must have a better idea.

    On 6/23/2012 11:49 AM, Pat wrote:
    > I was contacted by a really nice guy who is with a mission in the
    > southern mountains of Mexico.

    --
    Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
    --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 56 year old fat man.
  • Pat Delany
    Thanks Shannon I forwarded it to the man. Pat ________________________________ From: Shannon DeWolfe To:
    Message 2 of 13 , Jun 24, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      Thanks Shannon
      I forwarded it to the man.

      Pat


      From: Shannon DeWolfe <sdewolfe@...>
      To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, June 24, 2012 8:38 AM
      Subject: Re: [multimachine] A truck brake, clutch and driveshaft repair machine. [1 Attachment]

       
      Pat and all,

      I've been thinking about the fellow in Mexico who needs a brake lathe. I
      think he would be better served to build a dedicated brake lathe and use
      the MMConcrete lathe for his other work. Let me know what you think
      about the drawing attached.

      Basically the lathe consists of two engine blocks mounted so the head
      surfaces are facing one another. The spindle is held in place by the
      trapezoidal pieces shown on the right hand block. (The drawing was
      getting too busy so I only show the tapered collars on the right side,
      but four are required and they must have bearings sized to the spindle.)
      To mount the drum, the flywheel with ring gear is removed, the tapered
      collar/bearing inside the left block is removed and the entire spindle
      is slid to the right enough to admit the drum. The spindle is then
      reassembled and the drum is bolted to the flywheel between the two
      blocks. That flywheel is mounted to a collar that clamps to the spindle
      at any place between the two blocks necessary. The drum is moved as
      close to the left block as is practical and is clamped there. The
      cutting tool is mounted to the Romig slide as shown, the slide is
      mounted to a riser to bring the tool to the cutting plane, and the riser
      is mounted to the front face of the engine.

      The flywheel with ring gear is driven by a starter pinion gear mounted
      to a step-down pulley to achieve slow rotation with a standard single
      phase motor. The gearing can be calculated easily enough. The starter
      pinion and ring gear will give somewhere around 18:1. The actual tooth
      count will dictate the exact number. Pulleys are then chosen to achieve
      the slow rotation necessary. What would it be? 20 or 30 RPM? I don't know.

      Great care in alignment is, of course, necessary. My first idea was to
      use another pipe to mount the cutting tool in another bore. That would
      ensure that the tool and the drum are on the same plane. I could not
      think of a way to do that. The round bed lathes had an internal threaded
      rod that advanced the carriage, that might work. The pipe in the bottom
      hole will ensure that the two blocks always face squarely to one another
      even under load ... I think.

      This is strictly a manual machine and will tie-up at least one man for
      the duration of the job. With some ingeninuity that I can't seem to
      muster, it might be automated so it could be setup and left to run until
      a kill switch is activated.

      Improvements? One thing I recognize immediately is that the bearing
      arrangement is unworkable, sliding the spindle out and back in
      repeatedly introduces too much play. There are more than 6500 people
      subscribed here. Someone must have a better idea.

      On 6/23/2012 11:49 AM, Pat wrote:
      > I was contacted by a really nice guy who is with a mission in the
      > southern mountains of Mexico.

      --
      Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
      --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 56 year old fat man.



    • Larry Ruebush
      Pat I have been in the trucking business for over 45 years and have never heard of grinding a brake drum egg shaped. In fact if the DOT official stopped a
      Message 3 of 13 , Oct 28, 2012
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        Pat
        I have been in the trucking business for over 45 years and have never heard of grinding a brake drum egg shaped. In fact if the DOT official stopped a truck with those brake drums for a safety check, the truck would be placed out of service. A brake has to be tighten so close that a credit card will barely fit between the lining and the drum. A drum surface needs to be very smooth
         
         
          Larry Ruebush
        west central IL
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Saturday, June 23, 2012 5:13 PM
        Subject: Re: [multimachine] A truck brake, clutch and driveshaft repair machine.

         

        Thanks Dave
        I don't know how big the drums are, I assume well over 16". I know that it not really safe to turn them smooth since they are on big trucks coming down hill with a load of logs. The guys currently have to travel 2 hours to have them turned so egg shaped that the brake petal pulsates. I imagine the brake machine adapters are worn out.

      • HB
        That s true, Egg shaped brake drums are very dangerous and would result in less efficient and less effective application of braking forces due to the
        Message 4 of 13 , Oct 28, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          That's true,
          Egg shaped brake drums are very dangerous and would result in less efficient and less effective application of braking forces due to the uneveness of surface contacts between the drum and the pads.
          The least damage that could be expected is an irregular wear pattern on the brake pads and related components.
           
           
           
           
           

          From: Larry Ruebush <lrt@...>
          To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sunday, October 28, 2012 8:23 PM
          Subject: Re: [multimachine] A truck brake, clutch and driveshaft repair machine.
           
          
          Pat
          I have been in the trucking business for over 45 years and have never heard of grinding a brake drum egg shaped. In fact if the DOT official stopped a truck with those brake drums for a safety check, the truck would be placed out of service. A brake has to be tighten so close that a credit card will barely fit between the lining and the drum. A drum surface needs to be very smooth
           
           
            Larry Ruebush
          west central IL
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Saturday, June 23, 2012 5:13 PM
          Subject: Re: [multimachine] A truck brake, clutch and driveshaft repair machine.

           
          Thanks Dave
          I don't know how big the drums are, I assume well over 16". I know that it not really safe to turn them smooth since they are on big trucks coming down hill with a load of logs. The guys currently have to travel 2 hours to have them turned so egg shaped that the brake petal pulsates. I imagine the brake machine adapters are worn out.

        • Pat Delany
          The point I was trying to make was that this machine was all that was available. I understand that truck drums are usually replaced in the US because of DOT
          Message 5 of 13 , Oct 29, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            The point I was trying to make was that this machine was all that was available. I understand that truck drums are usually replaced in the US because of DOT standards but the only standards that apply in many developing world areas are the ones that mean economic survival for another few days. These are the standards that I and a lot of other small businessmen understand very well.

            This is what my efforts all all about.

            Pat


            From: HB <scfpigs@...>
            To: "multimachine@yahoogroups.com" <multimachine@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Sunday, October 28, 2012 10:58 PM
            Subject: Re: [multimachine] A truck brake, clutch and driveshaft repair machine.

             
            That's true,
            Egg shaped brake drums are very dangerous and would result in less efficient and less effective application of braking forces due to the uneveness of surface contacts between the drum and the pads.
            The least damage that could be expected is an irregular wear pattern on the brake pads and related components.
             
             
             
             
             

            From: Larry Ruebush <lrt@...>
            To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sunday, October 28, 2012 8:23 PM
            Subject: Re: [multimachine] A truck brake, clutch and driveshaft repair machine.
             
            
            Pat
            I have been in the trucking business for over 45 years and have never heard of grinding a brake drum egg shaped. In fact if the DOT official stopped a truck with those brake drums for a safety check, the truck would be placed out of service. A brake has to be tighten so close that a credit card will barely fit between the lining and the drum. A drum surface needs to be very smooth
             
             
              Larry Ruebush
            west central IL
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Saturday, June 23, 2012 5:13 PM
            Subject: Re: [multimachine] A truck brake, clutch and driveshaft repair machine.

             
            Thanks Dave
            I don't know how big the drums are, I assume well over 16". I know that it not really safe to turn them smooth since they are on big trucks coming down hill with a load of logs. The guys currently have to travel 2 hours to have them turned so egg shaped that the brake petal pulsates. I imagine the brake machine adapters are worn out.



          • Kobus Van der Walt
            hi HB and Pat have a look here http://blog.chaukhat.com/2010/07/funny-things-of-africa.html it give an idea that health and safety are not always the fist
            Message 6 of 13 , Oct 30, 2012
            • 0 Attachment
              hi HB and Pat
              have a look here

              it give an idea that health and safety are not always the fist priority... :)

              On Mon, Oct 29, 2012 at 5:58 AM, HB <scfpigs@...> wrote:
               

              That's true,
              Egg shaped brake drums are very dangerous and would result in less efficient and less effective application of braking forces due to the uneveness of surface contacts between the drum and the pads.
              The least damage that could be expected is an irregular wear pattern on the brake pads and related components.
               
               
               
               
               

              From: Larry Ruebush <lrt@...>
              To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sunday, October 28, 2012 8:23 PM

              Subject: Re: [multimachine] A truck brake, clutch and driveshaft repair machine.
               
              
              Pat
              I have been in the trucking business for over 45 years and have never heard of grinding a brake drum egg shaped. In fact if the DOT official stopped a truck with those brake drums for a safety check, the truck would be placed out of service. A brake has to be tighten so close that a credit card will barely fit between the lining and the drum. A drum surface needs to be very smooth
               
               
                Larry Ruebush
              west central IL
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Saturday, June 23, 2012 5:13 PM
              Subject: Re: [multimachine] A truck brake, clutch and driveshaft repair machine.

               
              Thanks Dave
              I don't know how big the drums are, I assume well over 16". I know that it not really safe to turn them smooth since they are on big trucks coming down hill with a load of logs. The guys currently have to travel 2 hours to have them turned so egg shaped that the brake petal pulsates. I imagine the brake machine adapters are worn out.


            • Pat
              Just what I had in mind! Pat
              Message 7 of 13 , Oct 30, 2012
              • 0 Attachment
                Just what I had in mind!

                Pat

                --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Kobus Van der Walt <kvdwalt@...> wrote:
                >
                > hi HB and Pat
                > have a look here
                > http://blog.chaukhat.com/2010/07/funny-things-of-africa.html
                >
                > it give an idea that health and safety are not always the fist priority...
                > :)
                >
                > On Mon, Oct 29, 2012 at 5:58 AM, HB <scfpigs@...> wrote:
                >
                > > **
                > >
                > >
                > > That's true,
                > > Egg shaped brake drums are very dangerous and would result in less
                > > efficient and less effective application of braking forces due to the
                > > uneveness of surface contacts between the drum and the pads.
                > > The least damage that could be expected is an irregular wear pattern on
                > > the brake pads and related components.
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > *From:* Larry Ruebush <lrt@...>
                > > *To:* multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                > > *Sent:* Sunday, October 28, 2012 8:23 PM
                > >
                > > *Subject:* Re: [multimachine] A truck brake, clutch and driveshaft repair
                > > machine.
                > > **
                > >
                > > 
                > > Pat
                > > I have been in the trucking business for over 45 years and have never
                > > heard of grinding a brake drum egg shaped. In fact if the DOT official
                > > stopped a truck with those brake drums for a safety check, the truck would
                > > be placed out of service. A brake has to be tighten so close that a credit
                > > card will barely fit between the lining and the drum. A drum surface
                > > needs to be very smooth
                > >
                > >
                > > Larry Ruebush
                > > west central IL
                > >
                > > ----- Original Message -----
                > > *From:* Pat Delany <rigmatch@...>
                > > *To:* multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                > > *Sent:* Saturday, June 23, 2012 5:13 PM
                > > *Subject:* Re: [multimachine] A truck brake, clutch and driveshaft repair
                > > machine.
                > >
                > >
                > > Thanks Dave
                > > I don't know how big the drums are, I assume well over 16". I know that it
                > > not really safe to turn them smooth since they are on big trucks coming
                > > down hill with a load of logs. The guys currently have to travel 2 hours to
                > > have them turned so egg shaped that the brake petal pulsates. I imagine the
                > > brake machine adapters are worn out.
                > >
                > > ****
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
              • Kobus Van der Walt
                ok, just to make it clear, these pics does not come from South Africa. Foreign investment is kind of important to us(i prefer local investment, but since i am
                Message 8 of 13 , Oct 30, 2012
                • 0 Attachment
                  ok, just to make it clear, these pics does not come from South Africa. Foreign investment is kind of important to us(i prefer local investment, but since i am no economist- toe the party line) :)

                  When visualizing South Africa, think of America, just everything realistically sized.. and drive on the other side of the road... Gauteng is about 100 miles across and is responsible for 10% of the GDP of the continent. Lions\elephants\game are in Zoo's and reserves. Apologies if i made this point already. regards Kobus


                  On Tue, Oct 30, 2012 at 6:05 PM, Pat <rigmatch@...> wrote:
                   

                  Just what I had in mind!

                  Pat



                  --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Kobus Van der Walt <kvdwalt@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > hi HB and Pat
                  > have a look here
                  > http://blog.chaukhat.com/2010/07/funny-things-of-africa.html
                  >
                  > it give an idea that health and safety are not always the fist priority...
                  > :)
                  >
                  > On Mon, Oct 29, 2012 at 5:58 AM, HB <scfpigs@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > > **

                  > >
                  > >
                  > > That's true,
                  > > Egg shaped brake drums are very dangerous and would result in less
                  > > efficient and less effective application of braking forces due to the
                  > > uneveness of surface contacts between the drum and the pads.
                  > > The least damage that could be expected is an irregular wear pattern on
                  > > the brake pads and related components.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > *From:* Larry Ruebush <lrt@...>
                  > > *To:* multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                  > > *Sent:* Sunday, October 28, 2012 8:23 PM
                  > >
                  > > *Subject:* Re: [multimachine] A truck brake, clutch and driveshaft repair
                  > > machine.
                  > > **
                  > >
                  > > 

                  > > Pat
                  > > I have been in the trucking business for over 45 years and have never
                  > > heard of grinding a brake drum egg shaped. In fact if the DOT official
                  > > stopped a truck with those brake drums for a safety check, the truck would
                  > > be placed out of service. A brake has to be tighten so close that a credit
                  > > card will barely fit between the lining and the drum. A drum surface
                  > > needs to be very smooth
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Larry Ruebush
                  > > west central IL
                  > >
                  > > ----- Original Message -----
                  > > *From:* Pat Delany <rigmatch@...>
                  > > *To:* multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                  > > *Sent:* Saturday, June 23, 2012 5:13 PM
                  > > *Subject:* Re: [multimachine] A truck brake, clutch and driveshaft repair

                  > > machine.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Thanks Dave
                  > > I don't know how big the drums are, I assume well over 16". I know that it
                  > > not really safe to turn them smooth since they are on big trucks coming
                  > > down hill with a load of logs. The guys currently have to travel 2 hours to
                  > > have them turned so egg shaped that the brake petal pulsates. I imagine the
                  > > brake machine adapters are worn out.
                  > >
                  > > ****
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >


                • Nick Andrews
                  Don t worry, economists don t know anything, especially if their name is Keynes... I saw wolves in the forest while hunting elk here in New Mexico a couple of
                  Message 9 of 13 , Oct 31, 2012
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Don't worry, economists don't know anything, especially if their name is Keynes...  I saw wolves in the forest while hunting elk here in New Mexico a couple of weeks ago, it was cool!

                    On Wed, Oct 31, 2012 at 12:10 AM, Kobus Van der Walt <kvdwalt@...> wrote:
                     

                    ok, just to make it clear, these pics does not come from South Africa. Foreign investment is kind of important to us(i prefer local investment, but since i am no economist- toe the party line) :)


                    When visualizing South Africa, think of America, just everything realistically sized.. and drive on the other side of the road... Gauteng is about 100 miles across and is responsible for 10% of the GDP of the continent. Lions\elephants\game are in Zoo's and reserves. Apologies if i made this point already. regards Kobus


                    On Tue, Oct 30, 2012 at 6:05 PM, Pat <rigmatch@...> wrote:
                     

                    Just what I had in mind!

                    Pat



                    --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Kobus Van der Walt <kvdwalt@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > hi HB and Pat
                    > have a look here
                    > http://blog.chaukhat.com/2010/07/funny-things-of-africa.html
                    >
                    > it give an idea that health and safety are not always the fist priority...
                    > :)
                    >
                    > On Mon, Oct 29, 2012 at 5:58 AM, HB <scfpigs@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > > **

                    > >
                    > >
                    > > That's true,
                    > > Egg shaped brake drums are very dangerous and would result in less
                    > > efficient and less effective application of braking forces due to the
                    > > uneveness of surface contacts between the drum and the pads.
                    > > The least damage that could be expected is an irregular wear pattern on
                    > > the brake pads and related components.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > *From:* Larry Ruebush <lrt@...>
                    > > *To:* multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                    > > *Sent:* Sunday, October 28, 2012 8:23 PM
                    > >
                    > > *Subject:* Re: [multimachine] A truck brake, clutch and driveshaft repair
                    > > machine.
                    > > **
                    > >
                    > > 

                    > > Pat
                    > > I have been in the trucking business for over 45 years and have never
                    > > heard of grinding a brake drum egg shaped. In fact if the DOT official
                    > > stopped a truck with those brake drums for a safety check, the truck would
                    > > be placed out of service. A brake has to be tighten so close that a credit
                    > > card will barely fit between the lining and the drum. A drum surface
                    > > needs to be very smooth
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Larry Ruebush
                    > > west central IL
                    > >
                    > > ----- Original Message -----
                    > > *From:* Pat Delany <rigmatch@...>
                    > > *To:* multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                    > > *Sent:* Saturday, June 23, 2012 5:13 PM
                    > > *Subject:* Re: [multimachine] A truck brake, clutch and driveshaft repair

                    > > machine.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Thanks Dave
                    > > I don't know how big the drums are, I assume well over 16". I know that it
                    > > not really safe to turn them smooth since they are on big trucks coming
                    > > down hill with a load of logs. The guys currently have to travel 2 hours to
                    > > have them turned so egg shaped that the brake petal pulsates. I imagine the
                    > > brake machine adapters are worn out.
                    > >
                    > > ****
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >





                    --
                    Nick A

                    "You know what I wish?  I wish that all the scum of the world had but a single throat, and I had my hands about it..."  Rorschach, 1975

                    "They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."- Benjamin Franklin, Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759

                    "Suburbia is where the developer bulldozes out the trees, then names the streets after them." Bill Vaughan

                    "The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato
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