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Auxiliary powered spindle

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  • Pat
    I added 6 drawings to 1 powered aux. spindle photo folder. The assembly could be made without welding. The base can rotate, the slide can both tilt up and
    Message 1 of 19 , Jan 9, 2012
      I added 6 drawings to " 1 powered aux. spindle" photo folder. The assembly could be made without welding. The base can rotate, the slide can both tilt up and down and also be advanced with a lead screw. The spindle can also be raised and lowered. A little primitive but I Think? it will work. A fancier model could have indexing but would be much harder to make.

      Tell me what you think.

      Pat
    • costasv
      Hi Pat Recentelly Charles send me a series of machining files downloaded from google books.A book named spindles from the workshop machinist series
      Message 2 of 19 , Jan 10, 2012
        Hi Pat
        Recentelly Charles send me a series of machining files downloaded from google books.A book named "spindles" from the workshop machinist series
        describes in details the how to.
        Seems that to acheve the desired spindle precision you must arleady have a lathe and the possibility to work between centers, a face-plate and a steady as a minimum.The same MM has not this grade of precision for a shuch work.
        But if you own arleady a precision lathe, you can easelly build a very good auxiliary spindle.
        reading from this book , I see that some bigger parts must be machined, like the spindle housing, and the clamping devices.
        I mean that it is diffucult to hold a work of round steel of 60mm OD and 25cm long in a 7X mini lathe for precision machining.
        Costas

        --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Pat" <rigmatch@...> wrote:
        >
        > I added 6 drawings to " 1 powered aux. spindle" photo folder. The assembly could be made without welding. The base can rotate, the slide can both tilt up and down and also be advanced with a lead screw. The spindle can also be raised and lowered. A little primitive but I Think? it will work. A fancier model could have indexing but would be much harder to make.
        >
        > Tell me what you think.
        >
        > Pat
        >
      • Pat Delany
        You are quite right Costas. I forgot to add that the spindle is based around a hardened, Solid Morse Taper socket like is used in the tailstock. The end needs
        Message 3 of 19 , Jan 10, 2012
          You are quite right Costas.
          I forgot to add that the spindle is based around a hardened, Solid Morse Taper socket like is used in the tailstock. The end needs to be annealed so that it can be drilled for the cross pin. The body is cast  from piston metal.
          This is very much a work in progress, I posted it to get comments about the spindle mount.

          Pat


          From: costasv <cvgoodphones317@...>
          To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, January 10, 2012 3:33 
          Subject: [multimachine] Re: Auxiliary powered spindle

           
          Hi Pat
          Recentelly Charles send me a series of machining files downloaded from google books.A book named "spindles" from the workshop machinist series
          describes in details the how to.
          Seems that to acheve the desired spindle precision you must arleady have a lathe and the possibility to work between centers, a face-plate and a steady as a minimum.The same MM has not this grade of precision for a shuch work.
          But if you own arleady a precision lathe, you can easelly build a very good auxiliary spindle.
          reading from this book , I see that some bigger parts must be machined, like the spindle housing, and the clamping devices.
          I mean that it is diffucult to hold a work of round steel of 60mm OD and 25cm long in a 7X mini lathe for precision machining.
          Costas

          --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Pat" <rigmatch@...> wrote:
          >
          > I added 6 drawings to " 1 powered aux. spindle" photo folder. The assembly could be made without welding. The base can rotate, the slide can both tilt up and down and also be advanced with a lead screw. The spindle can also be raised and lowered. A little primitive but I Think? it will work. A fancier model could have indexing but would be much harder to make.
          >
          > Tell me what you think.
          >
          > Pat
          >



        • JC JOHNSON
          Please, what is the procedure to download files from google books? Thanks.......Johnny
          Message 4 of 19 , Jan 10, 2012
            Please, what is the procedure to download files from google books?

            Thanks.......Johnny

            > From: costasv <cvgoodphones317@...>
            > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Tuesday, January 10, 2012 3:33
            > Subject: Re: [multimachine] Auxiliary powered spindle
            >
            >
            >
            > Hi Pat
            > Recentelly Charles send me a series of machining files downloaded
            > from google books.A book named "spindles" from the workshop
            > machinist series......
          • oldstudentmsgt
            Costas, the problem with what you re saying is that no one would ever be able to build a precision machine, as you don t have one to start with. If that is
            Message 5 of 19 , Jan 10, 2012
              Costas, the problem with what you're saying is that no one would ever be able to build a precision machine, as you don't have one to start with. If that is true, how do we have precision machines now?

              Now, if you mean that with the experience that Bill in OKC has, HE cannot make a precision spindle, that would be true. Not yet, anyway. As he he (I) practice, he will get better, learn the capabilities of his tools, and how best to use them. Eventually, he (I or you, for that matter) will be able to make a better spindle. With that new spindle, his work will get better, he will learn to do more precise work, and will eventually be able to make a new, and much more precise, spindle. Keep repeating, and eventually, he'll have something to rival a Hardinge lathe. THAT is how we got to where we are. You've shown it in your development of your work over the past couple of years that you've been working on your machines. Maudsley's screw-cutting lathe wasn't really of high precision, it was just better than most of his competitors, and kept getting rebuilt with better parts as they were able to make them. He did not say "I cannot do this." I will bet that he said, a lot of times, "Well, this is a little better than the last one."

              If we had all the money in the world, we could get anything we want. Having seen some of the things you've done, I doubt that you have all the money, and I know that I don't, either. Maybe Ian has it? Not likely, unless he just likes to teach. Any of us would be considered rich as Midas by the guy Pat is targeting for his MMLathe. If he's lucky, he may have experience with a springpole lathe, or even an old, worn out, scrap lathe from Europe or America. If not, he'll be starting several steps behind any of us on this group.

              I have heard a saying that engineers use here in the USA. "You can have it cheap, you can have it fast, or you can have it good. Pick any two."

              My lathe is relatively cheap, and I got it relatively fast. It needs tuned up, and I need to learn (relearn, actually, but it's been nearly 39 years since I last used a metal-cutting lathe) how to use it, and while I'm doing that, I'm also learning to use tools. I started making brass gibs for the carriage on my lathe. I've not done any draw-filing since that class, either, but it came back pretty quickly. Not that my old teacher would be happy with what I've done, but it's a lot closer to "gib-shaped" a lot sooner than I expected.

              Best of both worlds, to me, would be a small, accurate, lathe. My 7x10 isn't there yet, but it will be. If I live long enough, anyway! ;) Not everyone has the choices that I've had, or you or Ian, or Keith, or any number of others who've been on and off this list just since I started reading it. Don't forget the target. A kid like the one who electrified his village, for example. William Kamkwamba, The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind.

              Bill in OKC





              --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "costasv" <cvgoodphones317@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi Pat
              > Recentelly Charles send me a series of machining files downloaded from google books.A book named "spindles" from the workshop machinist series
              > describes in details the how to.
              > Seems that to acheve the desired spindle precision you must arleady have a lathe and the possibility to work between centers, a face-plate and a steady as a minimum.The same MM has not this grade of precision for a shuch work.
              > But if you own arleady a precision lathe, you can easelly build a very good auxiliary spindle.
              > reading from this book , I see that some bigger parts must be machined, like the spindle housing, and the clamping devices.
              > I mean that it is diffucult to hold a work of round steel of 60mm OD and 25cm long in a 7X mini lathe for precision machining.
              > Costas
              >
              > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Pat" <rigmatch@> wrote:
              > >
              > > I added 6 drawings to " 1 powered aux. spindle" photo folder. The assembly could be made without welding. The base can rotate, the slide can both tilt up and down and also be advanced with a lead screw. The spindle can also be raised and lowered. A little primitive but I Think? it will work. A fancier model could have indexing but would be much harder to make.
              > >
              > > Tell me what you think.
              > >
              > > Pat
              > >
              >
            • costasv
              I will reply to you his private e-mailwhere heis explaning this procedure(as soon as I will have the time). Costas
              Message 6 of 19 , Jan 11, 2012
                I will reply to you his private e-mailwhere heis explaning this procedure(as soon as I will have the time).
                Costas

                --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, JC JOHNSON <two-jays@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > Please, what is the procedure to download files from google books?
                >
                > Thanks.......Johnny
                >
                > > From: costasv <cvgoodphones317@...>
                > > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                > > Sent: Tuesday, January 10, 2012 3:33
                > > Subject: Re: [multimachine] Auxiliary powered spindle
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > Hi Pat
                > > Recentelly Charles send me a series of machining files downloaded
                > > from google books.A book named "spindles" from the workshop
                > > machinist series......
                >
              • keith gutshall
                Hi Bill That  may not be ture, I have been making some good spindles with out a matal lathe.  If you consider a total runout of 0.001(0.024mm) inch bad?  
                Message 7 of 19 , Jan 11, 2012
                  Hi Bill
                  That  may not be ture, I have been making some good spindles with out a matal lathe.
                   If you consider a total runout of 0.001(0.024mm) inch bad?
                   
                   The more parts I make the better they are. I will admit to turning more wood then metal,
                   but turnig larger pieces is hrard to do.
                   
                  Some of the lathe I have have wood for the main parts,but it works good for the job it was designed for.
                   
                  A small lathe would make a shaft for smaller machine.If you need a larger part ,then you have to
                  go to plan "B" to make it.
                   
                   Keith
                   
                   
                  Deep Run Portage
                  Back Shop
                  " The Lizard Works"
                  From: oldstudentmsgt <wmrmeyers@...>
                  To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Tuesday, January 10, 2012 5:54 PM
                  Subject: [multimachine] Re: Auxiliary powered spindle

                   
                  Costas, the problem with what you're saying is that no one would ever be able to build a precision machine, as you don't have one to start with. If that is true, how do we have precision machines now?

                  Now, if you mean that with the experience that Bill in OKC has, HE cannot make a precision spindle, that would be true. Not yet, anyway. As he he (I) practice, he will get better, learn the capabilities of his tools, and how best to use them. Eventually, he (I or you, for that matter) will be able to make a better spindle. With that new spindle, his work will get better, he will learn to do more precise work, and will eventually be able to make a new, and much more precise, spindle. Keep repeating, and eventually, he'll have something to rival a Hardinge lathe. THAT is how we got to where we are. You've shown it in your development of your work over the past couple of years that you've been working on your machines. Maudsley's screw-cutting lathe wasn't really of high precision, it was just better than most of his competitors, and kept getting rebuilt with better parts as they were able to make them. He did not say "I cannot do this." I will bet that he said, a lot of times, "Well, this is a little better than the last one."

                  If we had all the money in the world, we could get anything we want. Having seen some of the things you've done, I doubt that you have all the money, and I know that I don't, either. Maybe Ian has it? Not likely, unless he just likes to teach. Any of us would be considered rich as Midas by the guy Pat is targeting for his MMLathe. If he's lucky, he may have experience with a springpole lathe, or even an old, worn out, scrap lathe from Europe or America. If not, he'll be starting several steps behind any of us on this group.

                  I have heard a saying that engineers use here in the USA. "You can have it cheap, you can have it fast, or you can have it good. Pick any two."

                  My lathe is relatively cheap, and I got it relatively fast. It needs tuned up, and I need to learn (relearn, actually, but it's been nearly 39 years since I last used a metal-cutting lathe) how to use it, and while I'm doing that, I'm also learning to use tools. I started making brass gibs for the carriage on my lathe. I've not done any draw-filing since that class, either, but it came back pretty quickly. Not that my old teacher would be happy with what I've done, but it's a lot closer to "gib-shaped" a lot sooner than I expected.

                  Best of both worlds, to me, would be a small, accurate, lathe. My 7x10 isn't there yet, but it will be. If I live long enough, anyway! ;) Not everyone has the choices that I've had, or you or Ian, or Keith, or any number of others who've been on and off this list just since I started reading it. Don't forget the target. A kid like the one who electrified his village, for example. William Kamkwamba, The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind.

                  Bill in OKC

                  --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "costasv" <cvgoodphones317@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi Pat
                  > Recentelly Charles send me a series of machining files downloaded from google books.A book named "spindles" from the workshop machinist series
                  > describes in details the how to.
                  > Seems that to acheve the desired spindle precision you must arleady have a lathe and the possibility to work between centers, a face-plate and a steady as a minimum.The same MM has not this grade of precision for a shuch work.
                  > But if you own arleady a precision lathe, you can easelly build a very good auxiliary spindle.
                  > reading from this book , I see that some bigger parts must be machined, like the spindle housing, and the clamping devices.
                  > I mean that it is diffucult to hold a work of round steel of 60mm OD and 25cm long in a 7X mini lathe for precision machining.
                  > Costas
                  >
                  > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Pat" <rigmatch@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > I added 6 drawings to " 1 powered aux. spindle" photo folder. The assembly could be made without welding. The base can rotate, the slide can both tilt up and down and also be advanced with a lead screw. The spindle can also be raised and lowered. A little primitive but I Think? it will work. A fancier model could have indexing but would be much harder to make.
                  > >
                  > > Tell me what you think.
                  > >
                  > > Pat
                  > >
                  >



                • costasv
                  Hi all I have found this: http://www.deansphotographica.com/machining/projects/auxspindle/auxspindle.html It is an easy way to build an auxiliary spindle, but
                  Message 8 of 19 , Jan 12, 2012
                    Hi all
                    I have found this:
                    http://www.deansphotographica.com/machining/projects/auxspindle/auxspindle.html
                    It is an easy way to build an auxiliary spindle, but a boring bar and machining between ceters is nedded.

                    By the way , does anybody kow how to connect the two extremities of a O-ring drive "belt"? I have found a low-cost source in England,but they sell a tool for glue them for something like 280.00 sterlines.Too costly for me.

                    Costas
                    --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, keith gutshall <drpshops@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hi Bill
                    > That  may not be ture, I have been making some good spindles with out a matal lathe.
                    >  If you consider a total runout of 0.001(0.024mm) inch bad?
                    >  
                    >  The more parts I make the better they are. I will admit to turning more wood then metal,
                    >  but turnig larger pieces is hrard to do.
                    >  
                    > Some of the lathe I have have wood for the main parts,but it works good for the job it was designed for.
                    >  
                    > A small lathe would make a shaft for smaller machine.If you need a larger part ,then you have to
                    > go to plan "B" to make it.
                    >  
                    >  Keith
                    >  
                    >
                    > Deep Run Portage
                    > Back Shop
                    > " The Lizard Works"
                    >
                    >
                    > ________________________________
                    > From: oldstudentmsgt <wmrmeyers@...>
                    > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                    > Sent: Tuesday, January 10, 2012 5:54 PM
                    > Subject: [multimachine] Re: Auxiliary powered spindle
                    >
                    >
                    >  
                    > Costas, the problem with what you're saying is that no one would ever be able to build a precision machine, as you don't have one to start with. If that is true, how do we have precision machines now?
                    >
                    > Now, if you mean that with the experience that Bill in OKC has, HE cannot make a precision spindle, that would be true. Not yet, anyway. As he he (I) practice, he will get better, learn the capabilities of his tools, and how best to use them. Eventually, he (I or you, for that matter) will be able to make a better spindle. With that new spindle, his work will get better, he will learn to do more precise work, and will eventually be able to make a new, and much more precise, spindle. Keep repeating, and eventually, he'll have something to rival a Hardinge lathe. THAT is how we got to where we are. You've shown it in your development of your work over the past couple of years that you've been working on your machines. Maudsley's screw-cutting lathe wasn't really of high precision, it was just better than most of his competitors, and kept getting rebuilt with better parts as they were able to make them. He did not say "I cannot do this." I will bet that he
                    > said, a lot of times, "Well, this is a little better than the last one."
                    >
                    > If we had all the money in the world, we could get anything we want. Having seen some of the things you've done, I doubt that you have all the money, and I know that I don't, either. Maybe Ian has it? Not likely, unless he just likes to teach. Any of us would be considered rich as Midas by the guy Pat is targeting for his MMLathe. If he's lucky, he may have experience with a springpole lathe, or even an old, worn out, scrap lathe from Europe or America. If not, he'll be starting several steps behind any of us on this group.
                    >
                    > I have heard a saying that engineers use here in the USA. "You can have it cheap, you can have it fast, or you can have it good. Pick any two."
                    >
                    > My lathe is relatively cheap, and I got it relatively fast. It needs tuned up, and I need to learn (relearn, actually, but it's been nearly 39 years since I last used a metal-cutting lathe) how to use it, and while I'm doing that, I'm also learning to use tools. I started making brass gibs for the carriage on my lathe. I've not done any draw-filing since that class, either, but it came back pretty quickly. Not that my old teacher would be happy with what I've done, but it's a lot closer to "gib-shaped" a lot sooner than I expected.
                    >
                    > Best of both worlds, to me, would be a small, accurate, lathe. My 7x10 isn't there yet, but it will be. If I live long enough, anyway! ;) Not everyone has the choices that I've had, or you or Ian, or Keith, or any number of others who've been on and off this list just since I started reading it. Don't forget the target. A kid like the one who electrified his village, for example. William Kamkwamba, The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind.
                    >
                    > Bill in OKC
                    >
                    > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "costasv" <cvgoodphones317@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Hi Pat
                    > > Recentelly Charles send me a series of machining files downloaded from google books.A book named "spindles" from the workshop machinist series
                    > > describes in details the how to.
                    > > Seems that to acheve the desired spindle precision you must arleady have a lathe and the possibility to work between centers, a face-plate and a steady as a minimum.The same MM has not this grade of precision for a shuch work.
                    > > But if you own arleady a precision lathe, you can easelly build a very good auxiliary spindle.
                    > > reading from this book , I see that some bigger parts must be machined, like the spindle housing, and the clamping devices.
                    > > I mean that it is diffucult to hold a work of round steel of 60mm OD and 25cm long in a 7X mini lathe for precision machining.
                    > > Costas
                    > >
                    > > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Pat" <rigmatch@> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > I added 6 drawings to " 1 powered aux. spindle" photo folder. The assembly could be made without welding. The base can rotate, the slide can both tilt up and down and also be advanced with a lead screw. The spindle can also be raised and lowered. A little primitive but I Think? it will work. A fancier model could have indexing but would be much harder to make.
                    > > >
                    > > > Tell me what you think.
                    > > >
                    > > > Pat
                    > > >
                    > >
                    >
                  • Pierre Coueffin
                    I ve seen articles (I think in Model Engineer s Workshop, but I m not sure...) where the author made custom length round belts using polyurethane belting
                    Message 9 of 19 , Jan 12, 2012
                      I've seen articles (I think in Model Engineer's Workshop, but I'm not sure...) where the author made custom length round belts using polyurethane belting purchased in bulk.  He welded the belt by the following procedure:
                         Cut to length
                         Heated a razor blade with a torch
                         Press both ends of the belt against the blade
                         Pull the blade out and hold the two ends together until they cool
                         Trim off excess material

                      This PDF uses a similar procedure, only with a fancy alignment tool:

                      http://www.habasit.com/DownloadWeb/%285rh34445ydevuw55ppuki53t%29/GetAndShowDocument.aspx?docId=756&lan=en&ACWeb=92&DocLan=en

                      The round belting is neat in that you can make it run some interesting paths.  Harold Hall did a multi-part article where he build a vertical milling head that used the motor for his lathe as a power source...  The motor is fixed, and the milling head moves up and down, but because of the path that the belt runs, the total length is constant...

                      On Thu, Jan 12, 2012 at 12:16 AM, costasv <cvgoodphones317@...> wrote:
                      By the way , does anybody kow how to connect the two extremities of a O-ring drive "belt"? I have found a low-cost source in England,but they sell a tool for glue them for something like 280.00 sterlines.Too costly for me.

                    • John Kiely
                      Could I suggest cuttinig / splicing your belt by first cutting symmetrically and laterally along the belt on both ends. I.e. cutting half a cylinder in the
                      Message 10 of 19 , Jan 12, 2012
                        Could I suggest cuttinig / splicing your belt by first cutting symmetrically and laterally along the belt on both ends.
                        I.e. cutting half a cylinder in the case of a round belt and then using ordinary super glue.
                        I have not tried this on a lathe but I have tried it on some farm machinery.
                         
                        John Kiely

                        From: costasv <cvgoodphones317@...>
                        To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Thursday, January 12, 2012 8:16 AM
                        Subject: [multimachine] Re: Auxiliary powered spindle

                         
                        Hi all
                        I have found this:
                        http://www.deansphotographica.com/machining/projects/auxspindle/auxspindle.html
                        It is an easy way to build an auxiliary spindle, but a boring bar and machining between ceters is nedded.

                        By the way , does anybody kow how to connect the two extremities of a O-ring drive "belt"? I have found a low-cost source in England,but they sell a tool for glue them for something like 280.00 sterlines.Too costly for me.

                        Costas
                        --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, keith gutshall <drpshops@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Hi Bill
                        > That  may not be ture, I have been making some good spindles with out a matal lathe.
                        >  If you consider a total runout of 0.001(0.024mm) inch bad?
                        >  
                        >  The more parts I make the better they are. I will admit to turning more wood then metal,
                        >  but turnig larger pieces is hrard to do.
                        >  
                        > Some of the lathe I have have wood for the main parts,but it works good for the job it was designed for.
                        >  
                        > A small lathe would make a shaft for smaller machine.If you need a larger part ,then you have to
                        > go to plan "B" to make it.
                        >  
                        >  Keith
                        >  
                        >
                        > Deep Run Portage
                        > Back Shop
                        > " The Lizard Works"
                        >
                        >
                        > ________________________________
                        > From: oldstudentmsgt <wmrmeyers@...>
                        > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                        > Sent: Tuesday, January 10, 2012 5:54 PM
                        > Subject: [multimachine] Re: Auxiliary powered spindle
                        >
                        >
                        >  
                        > Costas, the problem with what you're saying is that no one would ever be able to build a precision machine, as you don't have one to start with. If that is true, how do we have precision machines now?
                        >
                        > Now, if you mean that with the experience that Bill in OKC has, HE cannot make a precision spindle, that would be true. Not yet, anyway. As he he (I) practice, he will get better, learn the capabilities of his tools, and how best to use them. Eventually, he (I or you, for that matter) will be able to make a better spindle. With that new spindle, his work will get better, he will learn to do more precise work, and will eventually be able to make a new, and much more precise, spindle. Keep repeating, and eventually, he'll have something to rival a Hardinge lathe. THAT is how we got to where we are. You've shown it in your development of your work over the past couple of years that you've been working on your machines. Maudsley's screw-cutting lathe wasn't really of high precision, it was just better than most of his competitors, and kept getting rebuilt with better parts as they were able to make them. He did not say "I cannot do this." I will bet that he
                        > said, a lot of times, "Well, this is a little better than the last one."
                        >
                        > If we had all the money in the world, we could get anything we want. Having seen some of the things you've done, I doubt that you have all the money, and I know that I don't, either. Maybe Ian has it? Not likely, unless he just likes to teach. Any of us would be considered rich as Midas by the guy Pat is targeting for his MMLathe. If he's lucky, he may have experience with a springpole lathe, or even an old, worn out, scrap lathe from Europe or America. If not, he'll be starting several steps behind any of us on this group.
                        >
                        > I have heard a saying that engineers use here in the USA. "You can have it cheap, you can have it fast, or you can have it good. Pick any two."
                        >
                        > My lathe is relatively cheap, and I got it relatively fast. It needs tuned up, and I need to learn (relearn, actually, but it's been nearly 39 years since I last used a metal-cutting lathe) how to use it, and while I'm doing that, I'm also learning to use tools. I started making brass gibs for the carriage on my lathe. I've not done any draw-filing since that class, either, but it came back pretty quickly. Not that my old teacher would be happy with what I've done, but it's a lot closer to "gib-shaped" a lot sooner than I expected.
                        >
                        > Best of both worlds, to me, would be a small, accurate, lathe. My 7x10 isn't there yet, but it will be. If I live long enough, anyway! ;) Not everyone has the choices that I've had, or you or Ian, or Keith, or any number of others who've been on and off this list just since I started reading it. Don't forget the target. A kid like the one who electrified his village, for example. William Kamkwamba, The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind.
                        >
                        > Bill in OKC
                        >
                        > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "costasv" <cvgoodphones317@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Hi Pat
                        > > Recentelly Charles send me a series of machining files downloaded from google books.A book named "spindles" from the workshop machinist series
                        > > describes in details the how to.
                        > > Seems that to acheve the desired spindle precision you must arleady have a lathe and the possibility to work between centers, a face-plate and a steady as a minimum.The same MM has not this grade of precision for a shuch work.
                        > > But if you own arleady a precision lathe, you can easelly build a very good auxiliary spindle.
                        > > reading from this book , I see that some bigger parts must be machined, like the spindle housing, and the clamping devices.
                        > > I mean that it is diffucult to hold a work of round steel of 60mm OD and 25cm long in a 7X mini lathe for precision machining.
                        > > Costas
                        > >
                        > > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Pat" <rigmatch@> wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > I added 6 drawings to " 1 powered aux. spindle" photo folder. The assembly could be made without welding. The base can rotate, the slide can both tilt up and down and also be advanced with a lead screw. The spindle can also be raised and lowered. A little primitive but I Think? it will work. A fancier model could have indexing but would be much harder to make.
                        > > >
                        > > > Tell me what you think.
                        > > >
                        > > > Pat
                        > > >
                        > >
                        >



                      • oldstudentmsgt
                        Keith, that was exactly my point! A not-perfect lathe can make good components. So can a small lathe run by someone who knows how. With those, you can build
                        Message 11 of 19 , Jan 12, 2012
                          Keith, that was exactly my point! A not-perfect lathe can make good components. So can a small lathe run by someone who knows how. With those, you can build (if you need it) a larger lathe, or a better lathe, or both. Might have to go through the cycle a few (dozen) times. ;)

                          Costas was saying that you couldn't build a precision spindle without a precision lathe. As you've said, you got .001" runout. On a wooden lathe. So you use that to make a better spindle than your wooden lathe had, and a metal lathe so the ways don't swell & shrink with changes in humidity, and do it again, and maybe you can get to .0001 the next round. IF you need better precision than that, you do it again and again until you get what you need. And if you need it that precise, you build an aircondtioner and cooling equipment to keep your tools at a specific temperature, and wear insulating gloves your the heat of your hands doesn't change the size of the material.

                          Besides, as I mentioned to Ian and David, it depends on what precision you need. Watt was happy with a 1/8" gap between cylinder wall and piston in his steam engines. If you're happy with .001" gap, and it works for what you want to do, why worry about getting to a 10-thousandth? You only go for that kind of presision is you NEED it, right? You don't, so you're happy with a bit more runout than Ian would perhaps need for a jet engine, or rocket motor.

                          I don't know what Costas wants to build. Maybe he DOES need better precision than that. But it's still true that we didn't start that way, we worked our way up to better precision as we developed the need for it.

                          For me, I got the smaller lathe knowing that if I wanted a bigger one, I'd have to build it. Happens I've got a friend here who casts iron in his backyard. If I can't do it myself, I'm sure he'd help me if I ask. I may just build a wooden lathe, one of these days, using my little metalcutting lathe to make the fiddley parts. I could certainly make 3" bearings with it, and that would give me a larger spindle than I have now. I could even make a (short!) spindle to fit.

                          Bill in OKC



                          --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, keith gutshall <drpshops@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Hi Bill
                          > That  may not be ture, I have been making some good spindles with out a matal lathe.
                          >  If you consider a total runout of 0.001(0.024mm) inch bad?
                          >  
                          >  The more parts I make the better they are. I will admit to turning more wood then metal,
                          >  but turnig larger pieces is hrard to do.
                          >  
                          > Some of the lathe I have have wood for the main parts,but it works good for the job it was designed for.
                          >  
                          > A small lathe would make a shaft for smaller machine.If you need a larger part ,then you have to
                          > go to plan "B" to make it.
                          >  
                          >  Keith
                          >  
                          >
                          > Deep Run Portage
                          > Back Shop
                          > " The Lizard Works"
                          >
                          >
                          > ________________________________
                          > From: oldstudentmsgt <wmrmeyers@...>
                          > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                          > Sent: Tuesday, January 10, 2012 5:54 PM
                          > Subject: [multimachine] Re: Auxiliary powered spindle
                          >
                          >
                          >  
                          > Costas, the problem with what you're saying is that no one would ever be able to build a precision machine, as you don't have one to start with. If that is true, how do we have precision machines now?
                          >
                          > Now, if you mean that with the experience that Bill in OKC has, HE cannot make a precision spindle, that would be true. Not yet, anyway. As he he (I) practice, he will get better, learn the capabilities of his tools, and how best to use them. Eventually, he (I or you, for that matter) will be able to make a better spindle. With that new spindle, his work will get better, he will learn to do more precise work, and will eventually be able to make a new, and much more precise, spindle. Keep repeating, and eventually, he'll have something to rival a Hardinge lathe. THAT is how we got to where we are. You've shown it in your development of your work over the past couple of years that you've been working on your machines. Maudsley's screw-cutting lathe wasn't really of high precision, it was just better than most of his competitors, and kept getting rebuilt with better parts as they were able to make them. He did not say "I cannot do this." I will bet that he
                          > said, a lot of times, "Well, this is a little better than the last one."
                          >
                          > If we had all the money in the world, we could get anything we want. Having seen some of the things you've done, I doubt that you have all the money, and I know that I don't, either. Maybe Ian has it? Not likely, unless he just likes to teach. Any of us would be considered rich as Midas by the guy Pat is targeting for his MMLathe. If he's lucky, he may have experience with a springpole lathe, or even an old, worn out, scrap lathe from Europe or America. If not, he'll be starting several steps behind any of us on this group.
                          >
                          > I have heard a saying that engineers use here in the USA. "You can have it cheap, you can have it fast, or you can have it good. Pick any two."
                          >
                          > My lathe is relatively cheap, and I got it relatively fast. It needs tuned up, and I need to learn (relearn, actually, but it's been nearly 39 years since I last used a metal-cutting lathe) how to use it, and while I'm doing that, I'm also learning to use tools. I started making brass gibs for the carriage on my lathe. I've not done any draw-filing since that class, either, but it came back pretty quickly. Not that my old teacher would be happy with what I've done, but it's a lot closer to "gib-shaped" a lot sooner than I expected.
                          >
                          > Best of both worlds, to me, would be a small, accurate, lathe. My 7x10 isn't there yet, but it will be. If I live long enough, anyway! ;) Not everyone has the choices that I've had, or you or Ian, or Keith, or any number of others who've been on and off this list just since I started reading it. Don't forget the target. A kid like the one who electrified his village, for example. William Kamkwamba, The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind.
                          >
                          > Bill in OKC
                          >
                          > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "costasv" <cvgoodphones317@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > Hi Pat
                          > > Recentelly Charles send me a series of machining files downloaded from google books.A book named "spindles" from the workshop machinist series
                          > > describes in details the how to.
                          > > Seems that to acheve the desired spindle precision you must arleady have a lathe and the possibility to work between centers, a face-plate and a steady as a minimum.The same MM has not this grade of precision for a shuch work.
                          > > But if you own arleady a precision lathe, you can easelly build a very good auxiliary spindle.
                          > > reading from this book , I see that some bigger parts must be machined, like the spindle housing, and the clamping devices.
                          > > I mean that it is diffucult to hold a work of round steel of 60mm OD and 25cm long in a 7X mini lathe for precision machining.
                          > > Costas
                          > >
                          > > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Pat" <rigmatch@> wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > > I added 6 drawings to " 1 powered aux. spindle" photo folder. The assembly could be made without welding. The base can rotate, the slide can both tilt up and down and also be advanced with a lead screw. The spindle can also be raised and lowered. A little primitive but I Think? it will work. A fancier model could have indexing but would be much harder to make.
                          > > >
                          > > > Tell me what you think.
                          > > >
                          > > > Pat
                          > > >
                          > >
                          >
                        • oldstudentmsgt
                          Johnny, I don t see where anyone else has answered you, so I ll take a shot at it. If you click on the cover illustration of a book you re interested in, and
                          Message 12 of 19 , Jan 12, 2012
                            Johnny, I don't see where anyone else has answered you, so I'll take a shot at it.

                            If you click on the cover illustration of a book you're interested in, and if it is available in "full view", you can usually download it as a pdf, or sometimes an epub, by clicking on the download link to the top left of the page that is displayed. Some of them are available as Google eBooks, and those may only be available in the epub format.

                            Another thing you can do, again only for "full view" books, is use jdownloader, from www.jdownloader.org, and click on the "link" option. Jdownloader will download the pages as individual jpg or png files, and you can print them to pdf, or save and convert to any othe format you like. This works with the Popular Mechanics and Popular Science magazines, as well. Haven't tried it on any of their other magazines. It also works on books that are full-view, but don't have the download link.

                            They keep changing their interface, so things change now and again, but for right now, you can use "Advanced Search" at the bottom of the page, and search for authors, publishers, or subjects you're interested in, and select full view as one of the options.

                            You may also want to go for the stuff that has a "preview" as the more recent books, those in copyright, just to see what's available. Jdownloader will only get the pages that are previewable, and not all of those, but there are some neat books out there.

                            HTH!

                            Bill in OKC

                            --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, JC JOHNSON <two-jays@...> wrote:
                            >
                            >
                            > Please, what is the procedure to download files from google books?
                            >
                            > Thanks.......Johnny
                            >
                            > > From: costasv <cvgoodphones317@...>
                            > > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                            > > Sent: Tuesday, January 10, 2012 3:33
                            > > Subject: Re: [multimachine] Auxiliary powered spindle
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > Hi Pat
                            > > Recentelly Charles send me a series of machining files downloaded
                            > > from google books.A book named "spindles" from the workshop
                            > > machinist series......
                            >
                          • oldstudentmsgt
                            Good find on the spindle and line boring, Costas! Dean is one of my inspirations, but I d missed that link! On the o-rings, I m not sure if this will work for
                            Message 13 of 19 , Jan 12, 2012
                              Good find on the spindle and line boring, Costas! Dean is one of my inspirations, but I'd missed that link!

                              On the o-rings, I'm not sure if this will work for your belts or not, but if you cut them at a diagonal with a very sharp blade, exacto knife or razor, that sort of thing, you can use cyanoacrylate (Super Glue, or Eastman 910) to bond the ends. I'm reasonably certain that a jig like is used for welding or brazing bandsaw blades would work to align the ends. I've not done it, but have read about it, somewhere, and some long time ago.

                              HTH!

                              Bill in OKC

                              --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "costasv" <cvgoodphones317@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Hi all
                              > I have found this:
                              > http://www.deansphotographica.com/machining/projects/auxspindle/auxspindle.html
                              > It is an easy way to build an auxiliary spindle, but a boring bar and machining between ceters is nedded.
                              >
                              > By the way , does anybody kow how to connect the two extremities of a O-ring drive "belt"? I have found a low-cost source in England,but they sell a tool for glue them for something like 280.00 sterlines.Too costly for me.
                              >
                              > Costas
                              > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, keith gutshall <drpshops@> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > Hi Bill
                              > > That  may not be ture, I have been making some good spindles with out a matal lathe.
                              > >  If you consider a total runout of 0.001(0.024mm) inch bad?
                              > >  
                              > >  The more parts I make the better they are. I will admit to turning more wood then metal,
                              > >  but turnig larger pieces is hrard to do.
                              > >  
                              > > Some of the lathe I have have wood for the main parts,but it works good for the job it was designed for.
                              > >  
                              > > A small lathe would make a shaft for smaller machine.If you need a larger part ,then you have to
                              > > go to plan "B" to make it.
                              > >  
                              > >  Keith
                              > >  
                              > >
                              > > Deep Run Portage
                              > > Back Shop
                              > > " The Lizard Works"
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > ________________________________
                              > > From: oldstudentmsgt <wmrmeyers@>
                              > > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                              > > Sent: Tuesday, January 10, 2012 5:54 PM
                              > > Subject: [multimachine] Re: Auxiliary powered spindle
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >  
                              > > Costas, the problem with what you're saying is that no one would ever be able to build a precision machine, as you don't have one to start with. If that is true, how do we have precision machines now?
                              > >
                              > > Now, if you mean that with the experience that Bill in OKC has, HE cannot make a precision spindle, that would be true. Not yet, anyway. As he he (I) practice, he will get better, learn the capabilities of his tools, and how best to use them. Eventually, he (I or you, for that matter) will be able to make a better spindle. With that new spindle, his work will get better, he will learn to do more precise work, and will eventually be able to make a new, and much more precise, spindle. Keep repeating, and eventually, he'll have something to rival a Hardinge lathe. THAT is how we got to where we are. You've shown it in your development of your work over the past couple of years that you've been working on your machines. Maudsley's screw-cutting lathe wasn't really of high precision, it was just better than most of his competitors, and kept getting rebuilt with better parts as they were able to make them. He did not say "I cannot do this." I will bet that he
                              > > said, a lot of times, "Well, this is a little better than the last one."
                              > >
                              > > If we had all the money in the world, we could get anything we want. Having seen some of the things you've done, I doubt that you have all the money, and I know that I don't, either. Maybe Ian has it? Not likely, unless he just likes to teach. Any of us would be considered rich as Midas by the guy Pat is targeting for his MMLathe. If he's lucky, he may have experience with a springpole lathe, or even an old, worn out, scrap lathe from Europe or America. If not, he'll be starting several steps behind any of us on this group.
                              > >
                              > > I have heard a saying that engineers use here in the USA. "You can have it cheap, you can have it fast, or you can have it good. Pick any two."
                              > >
                              > > My lathe is relatively cheap, and I got it relatively fast. It needs tuned up, and I need to learn (relearn, actually, but it's been nearly 39 years since I last used a metal-cutting lathe) how to use it, and while I'm doing that, I'm also learning to use tools. I started making brass gibs for the carriage on my lathe. I've not done any draw-filing since that class, either, but it came back pretty quickly. Not that my old teacher would be happy with what I've done, but it's a lot closer to "gib-shaped" a lot sooner than I expected.
                              > >
                              > > Best of both worlds, to me, would be a small, accurate, lathe. My 7x10 isn't there yet, but it will be. If I live long enough, anyway! ;) Not everyone has the choices that I've had, or you or Ian, or Keith, or any number of others who've been on and off this list just since I started reading it. Don't forget the target. A kid like the one who electrified his village, for example. William Kamkwamba, The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind.
                              > >
                              > > Bill in OKC
                              > >
                              > > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "costasv" <cvgoodphones317@> wrote:
                              > > >
                              > > > Hi Pat
                              > > > Recentelly Charles send me a series of machining files downloaded from google books.A book named "spindles" from the workshop machinist series
                              > > > describes in details the how to.
                              > > > Seems that to acheve the desired spindle precision you must arleady have a lathe and the possibility to work between centers, a face-plate and a steady as a minimum.The same MM has not this grade of precision for a shuch work.
                              > > > But if you own arleady a precision lathe, you can easelly build a very good auxiliary spindle.
                              > > > reading from this book , I see that some bigger parts must be machined, like the spindle housing, and the clamping devices.
                              > > > I mean that it is diffucult to hold a work of round steel of 60mm OD and 25cm long in a 7X mini lathe for precision machining.
                              > > > Costas
                              > > >
                              > > > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Pat" <rigmatch@> wrote:
                              > > > >
                              > > > > I added 6 drawings to " 1 powered aux. spindle" photo folder. The assembly could be made without welding. The base can rotate, the slide can both tilt up and down and also be advanced with a lead screw. The spindle can also be raised and lowered. A little primitive but I Think? it will work. A fancier model could have indexing but would be much harder to make.
                              > > > >
                              > > > > Tell me what you think.
                              > > > >
                              > > > > Pat
                              > > > >
                              > > >
                              > >
                              >
                            • Pat Delany
                              Thanks for this Bill This kind of stuff eats my lunch! Pat ________________________________ From: oldstudentmsgt To:
                              Message 14 of 19 , Jan 12, 2012
                                Thanks for this Bill
                                This kind of stuff eats my lunch!

                                Pat


                                From: oldstudentmsgt <wmrmeyers@...>
                                To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Thursday, January 12, 2012 2:32 PM
                                Subject: [multimachine] Re: Auxiliary powered spindle

                                 
                                Johnny, I don't see where anyone else has answered you, so I'll take a shot at it.

                                If you click on the cover illustration of a book you're interested in, and if it is available in "full view", you can usually download it as a pdf, or sometimes an epub, by clicking on the download link to the top left of the page that is displayed. Some of them are available as Google eBooks, and those may only be available in the epub format.

                                Another thing you can do, again only for "full view" books, is use jdownloader, from www.jdownloader.org, and click on the "link" option. Jdownloader will download the pages as individual jpg or png files, and you can print them to pdf, or save and convert to any othe format you like. This works with the Popular Mechanics and Popular Science magazines, as well. Haven't tried it on any of their other magazines. It also works on books that are full-view, but don't have the download link.

                                They keep changing their interface, so things change now and again, but for right now, you can use "Advanced Search" at the bottom of the page, and search for authors, publishers, or subjects you're interested in, and select full view as one of the options.

                                You may also want to go for the stuff that has a "preview" as the more recent books, those in copyright, just to see what's available. Jdownloader will only get the pages that are previewable, and not all of those, but there are some neat books out there.

                                HTH!

                                Bill in OKC

                                --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, JC JOHNSON <two-jays@...> wrote:
                                >
                                >
                                > Please, what is the procedure to download files from google books?
                                >
                                > Thanks.......Johnny
                                >
                                > > From: costasv <cvgoodphones317@...>
                                > > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                                > > Sent: Tuesday, January 10, 2012 3:33
                                > > Subject: Re: [multimachine] Auxiliary powered spindle
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > Hi Pat
                                > > Recentelly Charles send me a series of machining files downloaded
                                > > from google books.A book named "spindles" from the workshop
                                > > machinist series......
                                >



                              • David G. LeVine
                                ... Get some single edged razor blades (or an very sharp knife, like a box cutter), some waxed paper, masking tape, a bench block
                                Message 15 of 19 , Jan 12, 2012
                                  On 01/12/2012 03:16 AM, costasv wrote:
                                  Hi all
                                  I have found this:
                                  http://www.deansphotographica.com/machining/projects/auxspindle/auxspindle.html
                                  It is an easy way to build an auxiliary spindle, but a boring bar and machining between ceters is nedded.
                                  
                                  By the way , does anybody kow how to  connect the two extremities of a O-ring drive "belt"? I have found a low-cost source in England,but they sell a tool for glue them for something like 280.00 sterlines.Too costly for me.
                                  
                                  Costas
                                  

                                  Get some single edged razor blades (or an very sharp knife, like a box cutter), some waxed paper, masking tape, a bench block (or a V block), some slow-set cyanoacrylate (gel is best), some accelerator for the glue, and a cutting surface, acetone is a good thing to have around when using cyanoacrylates (it dissolves them, and they are great for gluing fingers together.)  Mold release eases cleanup and belt release from the V groove, but a good wax will help.

                                  Bench blocks can be really cheap, running under $20 (US) for a reasonable one.  They have a "V" grove and a series of holes in them.  Rick Sparber documented a whole bunch of uses for them (his site is a goldmine of techniques.)

                                  Take the two ends of the O-ring or round belt, lap them (i.e. put them parallel with the ends pointing opposite directions.)  Use a razor blade on the cutting surface to trim the ends square and at about right angles.  Put accelerator on one end and let it "dry" (a few minutes), put it in the groove on the bench block, hold with tape.

                                  Take the other freshly cut end and put a droplet of CA on it, you won't need much, put this in the groove and FIRMLY press the two ends together, a small piece of waxed paper will protect your fingertips.  Tape in place.  In a few minutes (or sometimes seconds!), remove the tape and waxed paper, peel the joined ring out of the the "V" groove.  Since cyanoacrylate adhesives will bond rubber to metal, you may need to use a razor blade to scrape the groove surface to free the o-ring, that is why mold release is so nice.  Bending the o-ring will often cause the surface CA to flake off, but abrasion will remove the excess easily.  Use acetone and paper towels to cleanup.  Bench blocks often have a hole right in the middle of the groove, for larger cord, this can help prevent any sticking.

                                  Bench (and "V") blocks are very useful for MANY other things, this is just one of them.

                                  Rick was courtesy copied because he was mentioned in this message.

                                  Dave  8{)

                                  --
                                  "Political Correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical minority and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end."
                                  (quoted from http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=30060)

                                  NOTE TO ALL:

                                  When forwarding emails, please use only "Blind Carbon Copy" or "Bcc" for all recipients. Please "delete" or "highlight & cut" any forwarding history which includes my email address! It is a courtesy to me and others who may not wish to have their email addresses sent all over the world! Erasing the history helps prevent Spammers from mining addresses and viruses from being propagated.

                                  THANK YOU!
                                • keith gutshall
                                  Hi Bill  Let s look at it form another point of view for our machine design.  Let take our shaft with 0.001 TIR and put a cheap scroll chuck on it.  The
                                  Message 16 of 19 , Jan 12, 2012
                                    Hi Bill
                                     Let's look at it form another point of view for our machine design.
                                     Let take our shaft with 0.001 TIR and put a cheap scroll chuck on it.
                                     The cheap scroll chuck has 0.003 TIR in it, so depending on where it
                                     fit on the shaft the TIR could be between 0.002- 0.004 in the spindle.
                                     
                                     If we use a bushing type shaft instead of a ball or taper bearing, we have to
                                     allow so much clearance between the bushing and shaft. Just for the argument
                                    here it s something like 0.002-0.003 for a 2 inch shaft.
                                     Friction on the shaft will make it expand as it heats up.
                                     
                                     
                                     Temperature does have a factor on the size of a part.and your tools.For the home hobbist
                                     not enought to worry about.
                                     I have sweated in a shop in the Virgina summer heat with no ac,, that is not fun.
                                     
                                    If you look at the Machinery's Handbook most thing have a size 0.0000 +- 0.00xx because
                                    you can't make the to the exact size. they work fine if they are anywhere near the size.
                                     
                                     Keith
                                     
                                    Deep Run Portage
                                    Back Shop
                                    " The Lizard Works"
                                    From: oldstudentmsgt <wmrmeyers@...>
                                    To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                                    Sent: Thursday, January 12, 2012 2:14 PM
                                    Subject: [multimachine] Re: Auxiliary powered spindle

                                     
                                    Keith, that was exactly my point! A not-perfect lathe can make good components. So can a small lathe run by someone who knows how. With those, you can build (if you need it) a larger lathe, or a better lathe, or both. Might have to go through the cycle a few (dozen) times. ;)

                                    Costas was saying that you couldn't build a precision spindle without a precision lathe. As you've said, you got .001" runout. On a wooden lathe. So you use that to make a better spindle than your wooden lathe had, and a metal lathe so the ways don't swell & shrink with changes in humidity, and do it again, and maybe you can get to .0001 the next round. IF you need better precision than that, you do it again and again until you get what you need. And if you need it that precise, you build an aircondtioner and cooling equipment to keep your tools at a specific temperature, and wear insulating gloves your the heat of your hands doesn't change the size of the material.

                                    Besides, as I mentioned to Ian and David, it depends on what precision you need. Watt was happy with a 1/8" gap between cylinder wall and piston in his steam engines. If you're happy with .001" gap, and it works for what you want to do, why worry about getting to a 10-thousandth? You only go for that kind of presision is you NEED it, right? You don't, so you're happy with a bit more runout than Ian would perhaps need for a jet engine, or rocket motor.

                                    I don't know what Costas wants to build. Maybe he DOES need better precision than that. But it's still true that we didn't start that way, we worked our way up to better precision as we developed the need for it.

                                    For me, I got the smaller lathe knowing that if I wanted a bigger one, I'd have to build it. Happens I've got a friend here who casts iron in his backyard. If I can't do it myself, I'm sure he'd help me if I ask. I may just build a wooden lathe, one of these days, using my little metalcutting lathe to make the fiddley parts. I could certainly make 3" bearings with it, and that would give me a larger spindle than I have now. I could even make a (short!) spindle to fit.

                                    Bill in OKC

                                    --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, keith gutshall <drpshops@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > Hi Bill
                                    > That  may not be ture, I have been making some good spindles with out a matal lathe.
                                    >  If you consider a total runout of 0.001(0.024mm) inch bad?
                                    >  
                                    >  The more parts I make the better they are. I will admit to turning more wood then metal,
                                    >  but turnig larger pieces is hrard to do.
                                    >  
                                    > Some of the lathe I have have wood for the main parts,but it works good for the job it was designed for.
                                    >  
                                    > A small lathe would make a shaft for smaller machine.If you need a larger part ,then you have to
                                    > go to plan "B" to make it.
                                    >  
                                    >  Keith
                                    >  
                                    >
                                    > Deep Run Portage
                                    > Back Shop
                                    > " The Lizard Works"
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > ________________________________
                                    > From: oldstudentmsgt <wmrmeyers@...>
                                    > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                                    > Sent: Tuesday, January 10, 2012 5:54 PM
                                    > Subject: [multimachine] Re: Auxiliary powered spindle
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >  
                                    > Costas, the problem with what you're saying is that no one would ever be able to build a precision machine, as you don't have one to start with. If that is true, how do we have precision machines now?
                                    >
                                    > Now, if you mean that with the experience that Bill in OKC has, HE cannot make a precision spindle, that would be true. Not yet, anyway. As he he (I) practice, he will get better, learn the capabilities of his tools, and how best to use them. Eventually, he (I or you, for that matter) will be able to make a better spindle. With that new spindle, his work will get better, he will learn to do more precise work, and will eventually be able to make a new, and much more precise, spindle. Keep repeating, and eventually, he'll have something to rival a Hardinge lathe. THAT is how we got to where we are. You've shown it in your development of your work over the past couple of years that you've been working on your machines. Maudsley's screw-cutting lathe wasn't really of high precision, it was just better than most of his competitors, and kept getting rebuilt with better parts as they were able to make them. He did not say "I cannot do this." I will bet that he
                                    > said, a lot of times, "Well, this is a little better than the last one."
                                    >
                                    > If we had all the money in the world, we could get anything we want. Having seen some of the things you've done, I doubt that you have all the money, and I know that I don't, either. Maybe Ian has it? Not likely, unless he just likes to teach. Any of us would be considered rich as Midas by the guy Pat is targeting for his MMLathe. If he's lucky, he may have experience with a springpole lathe, or even an old, worn out, scrap lathe from Europe or America. If not, he'll be starting several steps behind any of us on this group.
                                    >
                                    > I have heard a saying that engineers use here in the USA. "You can have it cheap, you can have it fast, or you can have it good. Pick any two."
                                    >
                                    > My lathe is relatively cheap, and I got it relatively fast. It needs tuned up, and I need to learn (relearn, actually, but it's been nearly 39 years since I last used a metal-cutting lathe) how to use it, and while I'm doing that, I'm also learning to use tools. I started making brass gibs for the carriage on my lathe. I've not done any draw-filing since that class, either, but it came back pretty quickly. Not that my old teacher would be happy with what I've done, but it's a lot closer to "gib-shaped" a lot sooner than I expected.
                                    >
                                    > Best of both worlds, to me, would be a small, accurate, lathe. My 7x10 isn't there yet, but it will be. If I live long enough, anyway! ;) Not everyone has the choices that I've had, or you or Ian, or Keith, or any number of others who've been on and off this list just since I started reading it. Don't forget the target. A kid like the one who electrified his village, for example. William Kamkwamba, The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind.
                                    >
                                    > Bill in OKC
                                    >
                                    > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "costasv" <cvgoodphones317@> wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > Hi Pat
                                    > > Recentelly Charles send me a series of machining files downloaded from google books.A book named "spindles" from the workshop machinist series
                                    > > describes in details the how to.
                                    > > Seems that to acheve the desired spindle precision you must arleady have a lathe and the possibility to work between centers, a face-plate and a steady as a minimum.The same MM has not this grade of precision for a shuch work.
                                    > > But if you own arleady a precision lathe, you can easelly build a very good auxiliary spindle.
                                    > > reading from this book , I see that some bigger parts must be machined, like the spindle housing, and the clamping devices.
                                    > > I mean that it is diffucult to hold a work of round steel of 60mm OD and 25cm long in a 7X mini lathe for precision machining.
                                    > > Costas
                                    > >
                                    > > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Pat" <rigmatch@> wrote:
                                    > > >
                                    > > > I added 6 drawings to " 1 powered aux. spindle" photo folder. The assembly could be made without welding. The base can rotate, the slide can both tilt up and down and also be advanced with a lead screw. The spindle can also be raised and lowered. A little primitive but I Think? it will work. A fancier model could have indexing but would be much harder to make.
                                    > > >
                                    > > > Tell me what you think.
                                    > > >
                                    > > > Pat
                                    > > >
                                    > >
                                    >



                                  • charlesmitchard
                                    ... I ve used the hot razor blade method with success but it was only for a rock tumbler so did not have to transmit much torque. I couldnt pull it apart
                                    Message 17 of 19 , Jan 12, 2012
                                      > By the way , does anybody kow how to connect the two extremities of a O-ring drive "belt"? I have found a low-cost source in England,but they sell a tool for glue them for something like 280.00 sterlines.Too costly for me.
                                      >
                                      > Costas

                                      I've used the hot razor blade method with success but it was only for a rock tumbler so did not have to transmit much torque.
                                      I couldnt pull it apart though.
                                      Tried the superglue trick but never got long lasting results from it.
                                    • costasv
                                      Thanx a lot for this input. Beor christmass I have used a cyanoacrylate glue with sucess in my bathroom to glue aluminium with plastic . Costas
                                      Message 18 of 19 , Jan 13, 2012
                                        Thanx a lot for this input.
                                        Beor christmass I have used a cyanoacrylate glue with sucess in my bathroom to glue aluminium with plastic .
                                        Costas

                                        --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "David G. LeVine" <dlevine@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > On 01/12/2012 03:16 AM, costasv wrote:
                                        > > Hi all
                                        > > I have found this:
                                        > > http://www.deansphotographica.com/machining/projects/auxspindle/auxspindle.html
                                        > > It is an easy way to build an auxiliary spindle, but a boring bar and machining between ceters is nedded.
                                        > >
                                        > > By the way , does anybody kow how to connect the two extremities of a O-ring drive "belt"? I have found a low-cost source in England,but they sell a tool for glue them for something like 280.00 sterlines.Too costly for me.
                                        > >
                                        > > Costas
                                        >
                                        > Get some single edged razor blades (or an very sharp knife, like a box
                                        > cutter), some waxed paper, masking tape, a bench block
                                        > <http://www.amazon.com/Vee-Blocks-Bench-Block/dp/B00077KLAA/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1326409191&sr=8-6>
                                        > (or a V block
                                        > <http://victornet.com/report/Vee-Blocks-Plain-and-Magnetic/1073.html>),
                                        > some slow-set cyanoacrylate (gel is best), some accelerator for the
                                        > glue, and a cutting surface, acetone is a good thing to have around when
                                        > using cyanoacrylates (it dissolves them, and they are great for gluing
                                        > fingers together.) Mold release eases cleanup and belt release from the
                                        > V groove, but a good wax will help.
                                        >
                                        > Bench blocks can be really cheap, running under $20 (US) for a
                                        > reasonable one. They have a "V" grove and a series of holes in them.
                                        > Rick Sparber <http://rick.sparber.org/> documented a whole bunch of uses
                                        > for them (his site is a goldmine of techniques.)
                                        >
                                        > Take the two ends of the O-ring or round belt, lap them (i.e. put them
                                        > parallel with the ends pointing opposite directions.) Use a razor blade
                                        > on the cutting surface to trim the ends square and at about right
                                        > angles. Put accelerator on one end and let it "dry" (a few minutes),
                                        > put it in the groove on the bench block, hold with tape.
                                        >
                                        > Take the other freshly cut end and put a droplet of CA on it, you won't
                                        > need much, put this in the groove and FIRMLY press the two ends
                                        > together, a small piece of waxed paper will protect your fingertips.
                                        > Tape in place. In a few minutes (or sometimes seconds!), remove the
                                        > tape and waxed paper, peel the joined ring out of the the "V" groove.
                                        > Since cyanoacrylate adhesives will bond rubber to metal, you may need to
                                        > use a razor blade to scrape the groove surface to free the o-ring, that
                                        > is why mold release is so nice. Bending the o-ring will often cause the
                                        > surface CA to flake off, but abrasion will remove the excess easily.
                                        > Use acetone and paper towels to cleanup. Bench blocks often have a hole
                                        > right in the middle of the groove, for larger cord, this can help
                                        > prevent any sticking.
                                        >
                                        > Bench (and "V") blocks are very useful for MANY other things, this is
                                        > just one of them.
                                        >
                                        > Rick was courtesy copied because he was mentioned in this message.
                                        >
                                        > Dave 8{)
                                        >
                                        > --
                                        > /"Political Correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional,
                                        > illogical minority and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream
                                        > media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to
                                        > pick up a turd by the clean end."/
                                        > (quoted from http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=30060)
                                        >
                                        > NOTE TO ALL:
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > When forwarding emails, please use only "Blind Carbon Copy" or "Bcc" for
                                        > all recipients. Please "delete" or "highlight & cut" any forwarding
                                        > history which includes my email address! It is a courtesy to me and
                                        > others who may not wish to have their email addresses sent all over the
                                        > world! Erasing the history helps prevent Spammers from mining addresses
                                        > and viruses from being propagated.
                                        >
                                        > THANK YOU!
                                        >
                                      • costasv
                                        Hi Charles can you reply here your posting about ho to download google books?
                                        Message 19 of 19 , Jan 13, 2012
                                          Hi Charles
                                          can you reply here your posting about ho to download google books?


                                          --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "charlesmitchard" <charlesmitchard@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > > By the way , does anybody kow how to connect the two extremities of a O-ring drive "belt"? I have found a low-cost source in England,but they sell a tool for glue them for something like 280.00 sterlines.Too costly for me.
                                          > >
                                          > > Costas
                                          >
                                          > I've used the hot razor blade method with success but it was only for a rock tumbler so did not have to transmit much torque.
                                          > I couldnt pull it apart though.
                                          > Tried the superglue trick but never got long lasting results from it.
                                          >
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