Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Another spindle and bearing question

Expand Messages
  • costasv
    Hi Shannon can you show me this tool ? I know that exists something like this tool, that you describe , but I do not have never see it.It is used to pistons
    Message 1 of 11 , Dec 1, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Shannon
      can you show me this tool ?
      I know that exists something like this tool, that you describe , but I do not have never see it.It is used to pistons bores repairs of the big escabators and public works machines .
      Is it possible to work both ends of the bore in a paralel and concentric way?
      The alternative is to make two smaller rings using the MM , and use them as the smaler bearings sit for this machine.I think that a member of this group (from Finland if I remember well)has adopted this solution to build his MM.But ofcourse he pre owned a lathe .
      Costas

      --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Shannon DeWolfe <sdewolfe@...> wrote:
      >
      > Costas,
      >
      > Do you think you could use a ridge reamer* to make a 1 or 2 mm ledge the
      > width of the bearings at each end of the cylinder for the bearings to
      > seat against? I don't know if that would work. I also don't know if
      > there is enough metal in the cylinder to do that. It's just an idea.
      >
      > *ridge reamer is what I have always called the tool. I do not know if
      > there is another "proper" name for it. It is a rotary cutter used to
      > remove the ridge that forms at the apex of the piston motion at the top
      > of the cylinder.
      >
      > Regards,
      >
      > Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
      > --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 55 year old fat man.
      >
      >
      > On 11/30/2011 12:48 AM, costasv wrote:
      > >
      > > It is a 4 bores inline diesel engine.
      > > In some minutes, I will go to measure the bore size with a micrometer.
      > > Costas
      > >
      >
    • Shannon DeWolfe
      Costas, The tool is self centering. You insert it into the bore and use the screw to adjust steel pads outward against the walls of the cylinder. The cutter is
      Message 2 of 11 , Dec 1, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        Costas,

        The tool is self centering. You insert it into the bore and use the
        screw to adjust steel pads outward against the walls of the cylinder.
        The cutter is then adjusted to "just touch" the walls beneath the ridge
        to be cut. Turning the cutter causes the cutter to advance outwardly as
        it cuts.

        Here is an example on the J. C. Whitney web site:
        http://www.jcwhitney.com/ridge-reamer/p2004236.jcwx?filterid=u0j1

        If the link fails, use the site search for "lisle ridge reamer"

        That particular tool might require the top portion of the body to be cut
        or ground away so the tool can be inserted deeply enough to do this job,
        which it was never intended to do. The design of the tool is different
        from one manufacturer to another but they all work on the same
        principle. It might take several passes to cut enough metal away to seat
        the bearings. The difficult part would be cutting in the bottom of the
        cylinder because the cutters are usually above the part of the tool that
        expands to lock the tool in place. Use Google (or your favorite search
        engine) to search "ridge reamer".

        Let me emphasize, I have never tried to cut away metal deeper than the
        original bore. I have do not know whether it can do what I have
        suggested. I have used the tool to remove the ridge at the top of the
        bore. It is amazingly efficient at doing the intended job.

        David had mentioned that your diesel engine might have cylinder liners
        (sleeves). If that is the case, removing the sleeves and cutting the
        bearing seats on a temporary lathe would be a better solution. Sleeves
        are usually replaced when worn out. I do not know whether a ridge reamer
        can be used on a sleeve. The cutter might cause the sleeve to rotate in
        the block.

        Regards,

        Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
        --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 55 year old fat man.


        On 12/1/2011 5:27 AM, costasv wrote:
        > Is it possible to work both ends of the bore in a paralel and
        > concentric way?
      • Shannon DeWolfe
        Costas, I was thinking on this problem of cutting a bearing seat into a cylinder. It seems to me that if you could accurately align a grinding wheel to the
        Message 3 of 11 , Dec 1, 2011
        Costas,

        I was thinking on this problem of cutting a bearing seat into a
        cylinder. It seems to me that if you could accurately align a grinding
        wheel to the center line of the bore and then provided a means of
        accurately advancing the wheel against the cylinder wall the job could
        be done more quickly and more accurately at the same time.

        From the foundry, use a couple of the pistons from the engine to pour a
        slug of aluminum slightly larger than the bore. Make it about 80mm long
        (not critical). Mount it in a temporary or wood cutting lathe. Face each
        end. Cut it to a tight sliding fit for the cylinder bore. Find the
        center of one face and drill the slug through. The diameter of this hole
        is determined by the arbor you will make for it.

        The arbor takes the shape of a "T" made so the crossbar of the T fits
        into the bore of the cylinder. The stem of the T is located by the hole
        drilled through the aluminum slug. Looking down on the top of the T,
        there is a slot on one side of the crossbar with a limiting screw in the
        end of the bar. (See the attached drawing for clarification.)

        Insert the slug into the cylinder to a depth that puts the grinding
        wheel at the deepest portion of the pocket to be cut. Use washers to set
        and adjust the depth as necessary.

        You will need an arbor in your grinding motor that extends beyond the
        grinding wheel about 10 or 15 mm and fits the slot cut into the crossbar.

        Grind away 1 to 2 mm of cylinder metal to form the pocket for your
        bearings. The T arbor is free to rotate in the slug; the grinder can be
        freely moved around the bore. The depth of the cut is adjusted with the
        setscrew in the crossbar of the T by limiting the distance of the
        grinding wheel from the center of the bore.

        Drive the slug to a position to repeat the same operation at the other
        end of the bore.

        Regards,

        Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
        --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 55 year old fat man.


        On 12/1/2011 5:27 AM, costasv wrote:
        > The alternative is to make two smaller rings using the MM
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.