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Re: [multimachine] Table Plan wanted

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  • Pat Delany
    Good job Dave! The most simple compound slide I have found is the one on the Romig concrete mill. It should work well enough to let the MM be used to make a
    Message 1 of 12 , Nov 8, 2011
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      Good job Dave!
      The most simple compound slide I have found is the one on the Romig concrete mill. It should work well enough to let the MM be used to make a really strong one (I think).

      Pat


      From: David G. LeVine <dlevine@...>
      To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, November 8, 2011 6:53 AM
      Subject: Re: [multimachine] Table Plan wanted

       
      On 11/07/2011 11:43 AM, jcrous wrote:
      I am new to this forum. I have joined because I would like to build a multimachine as well, A down scaled version.
      
      The written plan refers to a compound slide that can be made if a ready made one is not available.
      Here in South Africa it is quite expensive. A new Milling machine can be bought for R13 000.00 ($2 000.00) where a compound slide is R35 000.00 ($5 000.00).
      
      I am looking for a plan on how to make a compound table yourself if such plans are available. The other alternative is to make a table from metal strips, bolt together and fitted on a drill press sliding vice, of which the vice was first roughly grounded off and then milled flat. This option will only have small movement, but will be accurate and not too expensive.
      
      I would really appreciate any help on this matter.
      
      regards,
      Johan
      

      Johan,

      It would be useful to understand what you have available in materials and tooling. 

      For example, if drill rod is EASILY available, it may be a useful component, hydraulic cylinders and vehicular shock absorbers tend to make good, if limited life, ways.  If there is a planer or shaper available, tables suddenly are LOTS easier to build.  If allthread (screwthreaded rod) is available, it makes things a lot simpler.

      For a simple X-Y table (i.e. a slide table), shock absorber shafts in a concrete or E/G base is pretty simple and very effective, but will wear out in a reasonably short time.  Of course, a straight table can make ways for a longer lived table.

      Let us know what is available and we will try to come up with ways to use it.

      Dave  8{)

      --
      "Political Correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical minority and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end."
      (quoted from http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=30060)

      NOTE TO ALL:

      When forwarding emails, please use only "Blind Carbon Copy" or "Bcc" for all recipients. Please "delete" or "highlight & cut" any forwarding history which includes my email address! It is a courtesy to me and others who may not wish to have their email addresses sent all over the world! Erasing the history helps prevent Spammers from mining addresses and viruses from being propagated.

      THANK YOU!


    • jcrous
      I would like to build myself either a vertical or horizontal milling machine. I have access to bright mild steel flats and Silver Steel round bar. Also other
      Message 2 of 12 , Nov 8, 2011
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        I would like to build myself either a vertical or horizontal milling machine.
        I have access to bright mild steel flats and Silver Steel round bar. Also other types.

        --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Shannon DeWolfe <sdewolfe@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello Johan,
        >
        > Are you looking for a compound slide to fit a specific lathe? If not,
        > take a look in the files section here and also at the Romig Designs
        > group accessible from the link at the bottom of every message. J.V.
        > Romig designed several slides adaptable to flat slide lathes. He also
        > designed a small milling machine that had a compound table. Some of the
        > designs require a casting but most use cold rolled steel. Look through
        > the files. If you have difficulty finding something useful, let the
        > group know.
        >
        > Regards,
        >
        > Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
        > --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 55 year old fat man.
        >
        >
        > On 11/7/2011 10:43 AM, jcrous wrote:
        > > A new Milling machine can be bought for R13 000.00 ($2 000.00) where a
        > > compound slide is R35 000.00 ($5 000.00).
        >
      • jcrous
        I have access to my 210 X 400 mm lathe, and may get access to a milling machine for a short time. I have access to Bright Mild Steel flats, and rounds, and
        Message 3 of 12 , Nov 8, 2011
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          I have access to my 210 X 400 mm lathe, and may get access to a milling machine for a short time.
          I have access to Bright Mild Steel flats, and rounds, and key steel square. Also to Silver steel rods. I may be able to get tool steel as well. The other types like mild or stainless flats are very irregular. To brass and aluminium I also have access, but very expensive. I can not cast yet, but maybe that is my only option.

          I would like to make a small (not mini) milling machine - horizontal or vertical, although horizontal will be easier to make.

          The only option I can think of immediately will be to make a table from bms flats bolted together and bolted on top of a drill press vice slide, from which I have grinded the vice off, but then I am limited to about 6 X 4 inches of movement, but still it is better than nothing. Although I would like to have at least 12 X 4 movement and the table at least this side.

          I will settle for a plan where milling is involved, where I have a design where the slides are milled and the table top be bolted together. I don't know if I can get a design where the slide dovetails be milled from strips and the be bolted together.
          I don't think it will be too difficult. Where the top table (left and right movement when you stand in front of the milling machine and face it)move over the bottom part the top part of the dovetail slide will be the long, male part, and the bottom part will be the short female part with the pressure strips of brass. So the female part may be milled from two solid blocks for the two female parts (short) and the male parts may be milled from a strip, milled on both sides.

          Maybe there is a plan somewhere available.

          --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "David G. LeVine" <dlevine@...> wrote:
          >
          > On 11/07/2011 11:43 AM, jcrous wrote:
          > > I am new to this forum. I have joined because I would like to build a multimachine as well, A down scaled version.
          > >
          > > The written plan refers to a compound slide that can be made if a ready made one is not available.
          > > Here in South Africa it is quite expensive. A new Milling machine can be bought for R13 000.00 ($2 000.00) where a compound slide is R35 000.00 ($5 000.00).
          > >
          > > I am looking for a plan on how to make a compound table yourself if such plans are available. The other alternative is to make a table from metal strips, bolt together and fitted on a drill press sliding vice, of which the vice was first roughly grounded off and then milled flat. This option will only have small movement, but will be accurate and not too expensive.
          > >
          > > I would really appreciate any help on this matter.
          > >
          > > regards,
          > > Johan
          >
          > Johan,
          >
          > It would be useful to understand what you have available in materials
          > and tooling.
          >
          > For example, if drill rod is EASILY available, it may be a useful
          > component, hydraulic cylinders and vehicular shock absorbers tend to
          > make good, if limited life, ways. If there is a planer or shaper
          > available, tables suddenly are LOTS easier to build. If allthread
          > (screwthreaded rod) is available, it makes things a lot simpler.
          >
          > For a simple X-Y table (i.e. a slide table), shock absorber shafts in a
          > concrete or E/G base is pretty simple and very effective, but will wear
          > out in a reasonably short time. Of course, a straight table can make
          > ways for a longer lived table.
          >
          > Let us know what is available and we will try to come up with ways to
          > use it.
          >
          > Dave 8{)
          >
          > --
          > /"Political Correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional,
          > illogical minority and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream
          > media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to
          > pick up a turd by the clean end."/
          > (quoted from http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=30060)
          >
          > NOTE TO ALL:
          >
          >
          > When forwarding emails, please use only "Blind Carbon Copy" or "Bcc" for
          > all recipients. Please "delete" or "highlight & cut" any forwarding
          > history which includes my email address! It is a courtesy to me and
          > others who may not wish to have their email addresses sent all over the
          > world! Erasing the history helps prevent Spammers from mining addresses
          > and viruses from being propagated.
          >
          > THANK YOU!
          >
        • Shannon DeWolfe
          Howdy Johan, You have access to enough material to build just about any kind of table you might want to build. Joe Romig provided us with several different
          Message 4 of 12 , Nov 9, 2011
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            Howdy Johan,

            You have access to enough material to build just about any kind of table
            you might want to build.

            Joe Romig provided us with several different methods of making slides,
            tables, and cross slides.

            Look at his small bench mounted shaper for one of the heavier designs.
            Mr. Romig specified using a casting but there is no reason why it could
            not be a welded unit. You would have to true it after welding but that
            would the case even if it were cast. The table is about 10 x 7 inches as
            drawn but certainly could be enlarged. It has vertical positioning and
            the design is strong.

            The small concrete reinforced bench size miller has a table that has x
            travel of nearly a foot. Y travel is limited to half that. It is
            designed to mount a rotating vise so work can be held in any position.
            Knee travel on the drawing is 5 inches. Find the file
            "machine_tool_slides-1.pdf in the Romig Designs group files area for the
            slide design. That article describes the methods Mr. Romig used to make
            flat slides that can be mounted to almost any surface or machine tool
            with some adaptation.

            Mr. Romig's small lathes provide us with illustrations and methods to
            achieve travel, work holding, rotation, and tool holding. One standalone
            article is a short description of a tool holding slide with a travel of
            one inch. It is made to fit a standard lantern post. He also described a
            universal slide rest for small lathes that uses his flat slide design
            mounted to a carriage that can be made to fit virtually any lathe ways.

            All of the mentioned articles are available at the Romig Designs group,
            linked from at the bottom of each message.

            Regards,

            Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
            --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 55 year old fat man.


            On 11/8/2011 10:11 AM, jcrous wrote:
            > I am looking for a plan on how to make a compound table yourself if
            > such plans are available.
          • jcrous
            Thank you Shannon, I appreciate the feedback. After I finished my work today, I had a idle moment and I thought about my wanted to be project. I took a chance
            Message 5 of 12 , Nov 9, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              Thank you Shannon,
              I appreciate the feedback.

              After I finished my work today, I had a idle moment and I thought about my wanted to be project.

              I took a chance and contacted Coastal Engineering. They sell a table of 195 X 555 mm ( +/- 8 X 22 " ) with a travel of 150 X 290 mm (+/- 6 X 12 ") of travel for R 2250.00 ( about $ 300.00). They have one shorter but wider model as well.

              Now this is affordable. I then found out that the original price I quoted: that company get their slides from the same importer.

              I am still researching now on the slide, but this will be now to make a vertical slide (here I like the Gingery mill one or the Multimachine) for either to lift/lower the spindle or to higher / lower the flat surface on which the X?Y table will be mounted.

              I already have a 1,1 kW single phase motor (Brand new with the choice or what direction you want the motor to go).

              So now the project is a go. I think on making a horizontal bench size mill where I will attempt to motorize the long axis of the table and with the option to add an overhead shaft like the multimachine, so that I will be able to support a mandrel. If plan it carefully I will make the overhead shaft so that I can fit a vertical spindle as well (Light work).

              However if I can get the right design I will attempt to make a vertical model from the start. I will then mount the spindle pulleys and motor like the Unimat as I don't like the Gingery design of pulleys (Cosmetic personal preference only). However I would like the project to appear as neat as possible to a commercial one as I can. I am planning to make the spindle with a MT3 so that I can use my existing ER24 collet chuck. I am also thinking of making a built-in coolant system as well.

              I know a lot of my friends and even my family think I am insane, but you guys on this forum proves that I am not alone in my thoughts.

              My first lathe was a Craftman with solid half inch mandrel, and the machine so mutilated that I had no screw cutting capabilities. After everybody said I was mad I proofed them wrong when I ended with a spindle of 17 mm inside opening and a 30 mm metric spindle thread. it worked. But the set-up to align the spindle parallel to the bed and the tailstock was a bastard.

              So I am now officially hunting for ideas and parts. I give my commitment to compile a full plan as well for this forum. Although some ideas will be stolen from other designs. Unfortunately I work in metric only.


              --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Shannon DeWolfe <sdewolfe@...> wrote:
              >
              > Howdy Johan,
              >
              > You have access to enough material to build just about any kind of table
              > you might want to build.
              >
              > Joe Romig provided us with several different methods of making slides,
              > tables, and cross slides.
              >
              > Look at his small bench mounted shaper for one of the heavier designs.
              > Mr. Romig specified using a casting but there is no reason why it could
              > not be a welded unit. You would have to true it after welding but that
              > would the case even if it were cast. The table is about 10 x 7 inches as
              > drawn but certainly could be enlarged. It has vertical positioning and
              > the design is strong.
              >
              > The small concrete reinforced bench size miller has a table that has x
              > travel of nearly a foot. Y travel is limited to half that. It is
              > designed to mount a rotating vise so work can be held in any position.
              > Knee travel on the drawing is 5 inches. Find the file
              > "machine_tool_slides-1.pdf in the Romig Designs group files area for the
              > slide design. That article describes the methods Mr. Romig used to make
              > flat slides that can be mounted to almost any surface or machine tool
              > with some adaptation.
              >
              > Mr. Romig's small lathes provide us with illustrations and methods to
              > achieve travel, work holding, rotation, and tool holding. One standalone
              > article is a short description of a tool holding slide with a travel of
              > one inch. It is made to fit a standard lantern post. He also described a
              > universal slide rest for small lathes that uses his flat slide design
              > mounted to a carriage that can be made to fit virtually any lathe ways.
              >
              > All of the mentioned articles are available at the Romig Designs group,
              > linked from at the bottom of each message.
              >
              > Regards,
              >
              > Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
              > --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 55 year old fat man.
              >
              >
              > On 11/8/2011 10:11 AM, jcrous wrote:
              > > I am looking for a plan on how to make a compound table yourself if
              > > such plans are available.
              >
            • keith gutshall
              Hello Johan I have been kind of working on a 2X Gingery mill, and I have been useing steel shapes instead of castings.  I build machines when I am not turning
              Message 6 of 12 , Nov 9, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                Hello Johan
                I have been kind of working on a 2X Gingery mill, and I have been useing steel shapes
                instead of castings.
                 I build machines when I am not turning wooden bowls.
                 You might want to look at some of the ideas in DRP  shops photo folders.
                 If they don't make ,build it.
                 
                 Keith
                 
                Deep Run Portage
                Back Shop
                " The Lizard Works"
                From: jcrous <jcrous1@...>
                To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Wednesday, November 9, 2011 11:26 AM
                Subject: [multimachine] Re: Table Plan wanted

                 
                Thank you Shannon,
                I appreciate the feedback.

                After I finished my work today, I had a idle moment and I thought about my wanted to be project.

                I took a chance and contacted Coastal Engineering. They sell a table of 195 X 555 mm ( +/- 8 X 22 " ) with a travel of 150 X 290 mm (+/- 6 X 12 ") of travel for R 2250.00 ( about $ 300.00). They have one shorter but wider model as well.

                Now this is affordable. I then found out that the original price I quoted: that company get their slides from the same importer.

                I am still researching now on the slide, but this will be now to make a vertical slide (here I like the Gingery mill one or the Multimachine) for either to lift/lower the spindle or to higher / lower the flat surface on which the X?Y table will be mounted.

                I already have a 1,1 kW single phase motor (Brand new with the choice or what direction you want the motor to go).

                So now the project is a go. I think on making a horizontal bench size mill where I will attempt to motorize the long axis of the table and with the option to add an overhead shaft like the multimachine, so that I will be able to support a mandrel. If plan it carefully I will make the overhead shaft so that I can fit a vertical spindle as well (Light work).

                However if I can get the right design I will attempt to make a vertical model from the start. I will then mount the spindle pulleys and motor like the Unimat as I don't like the Gingery design of pulleys (Cosmetic personal preference only). However I would like the project to appear as neat as possible to a commercial one as I can. I am planning to make the spindle with a MT3 so that I can use my existing ER24 collet chuck. I am also thinking of making a built-in coolant system as well.

                I know a lot of my friends and even my family think I am insane, but you guys on this forum proves that I am not alone in my thoughts.

                My first lathe was a Craftman with solid half inch mandrel, and the machine so mutilated that I had no screw cutting capabilities. After everybody said I was mad I proofed them wrong when I ended with a spindle of 17 mm inside opening and a 30 mm metric spindle thread. it worked. But the set-up to align the spindle parallel to the bed and the tailstock was a bastard.

                So I am now officially hunting for ideas and parts. I give my commitment to compile a full plan as well for this forum. Although some ideas will be stolen from other designs. Unfortunately I work in metric only.

                --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Shannon DeWolfe <sdewolfe@...> wrote:
                >
                > Howdy Johan,
                >
                > You have access to enough material to build just about any kind of table
                > you might want to build.
                >
                > Joe Romig provided us with several different methods of making slides,
                > tables, and cross slides.
                >
                > Look at his small bench mounted shaper for one of the heavier designs.
                > Mr. Romig specified using a casting but there is no reason why it could
                > not be a welded unit. You would have to true it after welding but that
                > would the case even if it were cast. The table is about 10 x 7 inches as
                > drawn but certainly could be enlarged. It has vertical positioning and
                > the design is strong.
                >
                > The small concrete reinforced bench size miller has a table that has x
                > travel of nearly a foot. Y travel is limited to half that. It is
                > designed to mount a rotating vise so work can be held in any position.
                > Knee travel on the drawing is 5 inches. Find the file
                > "machine_tool_slides-1.pdf in the Romig Designs group files area for the
                > slide design. That article describes the methods Mr. Romig used to make
                > flat slides that can be mounted to almost any surface or machine tool
                > with some adaptation.
                >
                > Mr. Romig's small lathes provide us with illustrations and methods to
                > achieve travel, work holding, rotation, and tool holding. One standalone
                > article is a short description of a tool holding slide with a travel of
                > one inch. It is made to fit a standard lantern post. He also described a
                > universal slide rest for small lathes that uses his flat slide design
                > mounted to a carriage that can be made to fit virtually any lathe ways.
                >
                > All of the mentioned articles are available at the Romig Designs group,
                > linked from at the bottom of each message.
                >
                > Regards,
                >
                > Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
                > --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 55 year old fat man.
                >
                >
                > On 11/8/2011 10:11 AM, jcrous wrote:
                > > I am looking for a plan on how to make a compound table yourself if
                > > such plans are available.
                >



              • jcrous
                Keith, Do you have a link for me for the mentioned folder?
                Message 7 of 12 , Nov 10, 2011
                • 0 Attachment
                  Keith,
                  Do you have a link for me for the mentioned folder?


                  --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, keith gutshall <drpshops@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hello Johan
                  > I have been kind of working on a 2X Gingery mill, and I have been useing steel shapes
                  > instead of castings.
                  >  I build machines when I am not turning wooden bowls.
                  >  You might want to look at some of the ideas in DRP  shops photo folders.
                  >  If they don't make ,build it.
                  >  
                  >  Keith
                  >
                  > Deep Run Portage
                  > Back Shop
                  > " The Lizard Works"
                  >
                  >
                  > ________________________________
                  > From: jcrous <jcrous1@...>
                  > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                  > Sent: Wednesday, November 9, 2011 11:26 AM
                  > Subject: [multimachine] Re: Table Plan wanted
                  >
                  >
                  >  
                  > Thank you Shannon,
                  > I appreciate the feedback.
                  >
                  > After I finished my work today, I had a idle moment and I thought about my wanted to be project.
                  >
                  > I took a chance and contacted Coastal Engineering. They sell a table of 195 X 555 mm ( +/- 8 X 22 " ) with a travel of 150 X 290 mm (+/- 6 X 12 ") of travel for R 2250.00 ( about $ 300.00). They have one shorter but wider model as well.
                  >
                  > Now this is affordable. I then found out that the original price I quoted: that company get their slides from the same importer.
                  >
                  > I am still researching now on the slide, but this will be now to make a vertical slide (here I like the Gingery mill one or the Multimachine) for either to lift/lower the spindle or to higher / lower the flat surface on which the X?Y table will be mounted.
                  >
                  > I already have a 1,1 kW single phase motor (Brand new with the choice or what direction you want the motor to go).
                  >
                  > So now the project is a go. I think on making a horizontal bench size mill where I will attempt to motorize the long axis of the table and with the option to add an overhead shaft like the multimachine, so that I will be able to support a mandrel. If plan it carefully I will make the overhead shaft so that I can fit a vertical spindle as well (Light work).
                  >
                  > However if I can get the right design I will attempt to make a vertical model from the start. I will then mount the spindle pulleys and motor like the Unimat as I don't like the Gingery design of pulleys (Cosmetic personal preference only). However I would like the project to appear as neat as possible to a commercial one as I can. I am planning to make the spindle with a MT3 so that I can use my existing ER24 collet chuck. I am also thinking of making a built-in coolant system as well.
                  >
                  > I know a lot of my friends and even my family think I am insane, but you guys on this forum proves that I am not alone in my thoughts.
                  >
                  > My first lathe was a Craftman with solid half inch mandrel, and the machine so mutilated that I had no screw cutting capabilities. After everybody said I was mad I proofed them wrong when I ended with a spindle of 17 mm inside opening and a 30 mm metric spindle thread. it worked. But the set-up to align the spindle parallel to the bed and the tailstock was a bastard.
                  >
                  > So I am now officially hunting for ideas and parts. I give my commitment to compile a full plan as well for this forum. Although some ideas will be stolen from other designs. Unfortunately I work in metric only.
                  >
                  > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Shannon DeWolfe <sdewolfe@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Howdy Johan,
                  > >
                  > > You have access to enough material to build just about any kind of table
                  > > you might want to build.
                  > >
                  > > Joe Romig provided us with several different methods of making slides,
                  > > tables, and cross slides.
                  > >
                  > > Look at his small bench mounted shaper for one of the heavier designs.
                  > > Mr. Romig specified using a casting but there is no reason why it could
                  > > not be a welded unit. You would have to true it after welding but that
                  > > would the case even if it were cast. The table is about 10 x 7 inches as
                  > > drawn but certainly could be enlarged. It has vertical positioning and
                  > > the design is strong.
                  > >
                  > > The small concrete reinforced bench size miller has a table that has x
                  > > travel of nearly a foot. Y travel is limited to half that. It is
                  > > designed to mount a rotating vise so work can be held in any position.
                  > > Knee travel on the drawing is 5 inches. Find the file
                  > > "machine_tool_slides-1.pdf in the Romig Designs group files area for the
                  > > slide design. That article describes the methods Mr. Romig used to make
                  > > flat slides that can be mounted to almost any surface or machine tool
                  > > with some adaptation.
                  > >
                  > > Mr. Romig's small lathes provide us with illustrations and methods to
                  > > achieve travel, work holding, rotation, and tool holding. One standalone
                  > > article is a short description of a tool holding slide with a travel of
                  > > one inch. It is made to fit a standard lantern post. He also described a
                  > > universal slide rest for small lathes that uses his flat slide design
                  > > mounted to a carriage that can be made to fit virtually any lathe ways.
                  > >
                  > > All of the mentioned articles are available at the Romig Designs group,
                  > > linked from at the bottom of each message.
                  > >
                  > > Regards,
                  > >
                  > > Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
                  > > --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 55 year old fat man.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > On 11/8/2011 10:11 AM, jcrous wrote:
                  > > > I am looking for a plan on how to make a compound table yourself if
                  > > > such plans are available.
                  > >
                  >
                • jcrous
                  Keith, Do you have a link for me for the mentioned folder? The one you referred to in the quoted text? ( Â You might want to look at some of the ideas in
                  Message 8 of 12 , Nov 11, 2011
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Keith,
                    Do you have a link for me for the mentioned folder? The one you referred to in the quoted text?

                    (>>>>> Â You might want to look at some of the ideas in DRPÂ shops photo folders.
                    >>>>> Â If they don't make ,build it.
                    >>>>> Â
                    >>>>> Â Keith
                    >
                    > Deep Run Portage
                    > Back Shop
                    > " The Lizard Works"

                    --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "jcrous" <jcrous1@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Keith,
                    > Do you have a link for me for the mentioned folder?
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, keith gutshall <drpshops@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Hello Johan
                    > > I have been kind of working on a 2X Gingery mill, and I have been useing steel shapes
                    > > instead of castings.
                    > >  I build machines when I am not turning wooden bowls.
                    > >  You might want to look at some of the ideas in DRP  shops photo folders.
                    > >  If they don't make ,build it.
                    > >  
                    > >  Keith
                    > >
                    > > Deep Run Portage
                    > > Back Shop
                    > > " The Lizard Works"
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > ________________________________
                    > > From: jcrous <jcrous1@>
                    > > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                    > > Sent: Wednesday, November 9, 2011 11:26 AM
                    > > Subject: [multimachine] Re: Table Plan wanted
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >  
                    > > Thank you Shannon,
                    > > I appreciate the feedback.
                    > >
                    > > After I finished my work today, I had a idle moment and I thought about my wanted to be project.
                    > >
                    > > I took a chance and contacted Coastal Engineering. They sell a table of 195 X 555 mm ( +/- 8 X 22 " ) with a travel of 150 X 290 mm (+/- 6 X 12 ") of travel for R 2250.00 ( about $ 300.00). They have one shorter but wider model as well.
                    > >
                    > > Now this is affordable. I then found out that the original price I quoted: that company get their slides from the same importer.
                    > >
                    > > I am still researching now on the slide, but this will be now to make a vertical slide (here I like the Gingery mill one or the Multimachine) for either to lift/lower the spindle or to higher / lower the flat surface on which the X?Y table will be mounted.
                    > >
                    > > I already have a 1,1 kW single phase motor (Brand new with the choice or what direction you want the motor to go).
                    > >
                    > > So now the project is a go. I think on making a horizontal bench size mill where I will attempt to motorize the long axis of the table and with the option to add an overhead shaft like the multimachine, so that I will be able to support a mandrel. If plan it carefully I will make the overhead shaft so that I can fit a vertical spindle as well (Light work).
                    > >
                    > > However if I can get the right design I will attempt to make a vertical model from the start. I will then mount the spindle pulleys and motor like the Unimat as I don't like the Gingery design of pulleys (Cosmetic personal preference only). However I would like the project to appear as neat as possible to a commercial one as I can. I am planning to make the spindle with a MT3 so that I can use my existing ER24 collet chuck. I am also thinking of making a built-in coolant system as well.
                    > >
                    > > I know a lot of my friends and even my family think I am insane, but you guys on this forum proves that I am not alone in my thoughts.
                    > >
                    > > My first lathe was a Craftman with solid half inch mandrel, and the machine so mutilated that I had no screw cutting capabilities. After everybody said I was mad I proofed them wrong when I ended with a spindle of 17 mm inside opening and a 30 mm metric spindle thread. it worked. But the set-up to align the spindle parallel to the bed and the tailstock was a bastard.
                    > >
                    > > So I am now officially hunting for ideas and parts. I give my commitment to compile a full plan as well for this forum. Although some ideas will be stolen from other designs. Unfortunately I work in metric only.
                    > >
                    > > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Shannon DeWolfe <sdewolfe@> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > Howdy Johan,
                    > > >
                    > > > You have access to enough material to build just about any kind of table
                    > > > you might want to build.
                    > > >
                    > > > Joe Romig provided us with several different methods of making slides,
                    > > > tables, and cross slides.
                    > > >
                    > > > Look at his small bench mounted shaper for one of the heavier designs.
                    > > > Mr. Romig specified using a casting but there is no reason why it could
                    > > > not be a welded unit. You would have to true it after welding but that
                    > > > would the case even if it were cast. The table is about 10 x 7 inches as
                    > > > drawn but certainly could be enlarged. It has vertical positioning and
                    > > > the design is strong.
                    > > >
                    > > > The small concrete reinforced bench size miller has a table that has x
                    > > > travel of nearly a foot. Y travel is limited to half that. It is
                    > > > designed to mount a rotating vise so work can be held in any position.
                    > > > Knee travel on the drawing is 5 inches. Find the file
                    > > > "machine_tool_slides-1.pdf in the Romig Designs group files area for the
                    > > > slide design. That article describes the methods Mr. Romig used to make
                    > > > flat slides that can be mounted to almost any surface or machine tool
                    > > > with some adaptation.
                    > > >
                    > > > Mr. Romig's small lathes provide us with illustrations and methods to
                    > > > achieve travel, work holding, rotation, and tool holding. One standalone
                    > > > article is a short description of a tool holding slide with a travel of
                    > > > one inch. It is made to fit a standard lantern post. He also described a
                    > > > universal slide rest for small lathes that uses his flat slide design
                    > > > mounted to a carriage that can be made to fit virtually any lathe ways.
                    > > >
                    > > > All of the mentioned articles are available at the Romig Designs group,
                    > > > linked from at the bottom of each message.
                    > > >
                    > > > Regards,
                    > > >
                    > > > Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
                    > > > --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 55 year old fat man.
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > On 11/8/2011 10:11 AM, jcrous wrote:
                    > > > > I am looking for a plan on how to make a compound table yourself if
                    > > > > such plans are available.
                    > > >
                    > >
                    >
                  • jcrous
                    Hello, I have acquired a proper slide. Although it is of Eastern manufacture, I bought it from Coastal Engineering, a company with a good reputation for
                    Message 9 of 12 , Nov 13, 2011
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Hello,
                      I have acquired a proper slide. Although it is of Eastern manufacture, I bought it from Coastal Engineering, a company with a good reputation for quality.

                      The table is 196 X 555 mm and the movement is 290 X 150 mm. Enough for what I want.

                      Here is a few pics:

                      http://i798.photobucket.com/albums/yy261/Boerseun1/Milling/CompoundSlide_1685.jpg

                      http://i798.photobucket.com/albums/yy261/Boerseun1/Milling/CompoundSlide_1686.jpg

                      http://i798.photobucket.com/albums/yy261/Boerseun1/Milling/CompoundSlide_1687.jpg

                      and

                      http://i798.photobucket.com/albums/yy261/Boerseun1/Milling/CompoundSlide_1689.jpg

                      I also have started to draw the design in CAD so that I can properly plan. Not 100% complete, but almost there. The dimensions are correct:

                      http://i798.photobucket.com/albums/yy261/Boerseun1/Milling/CompoundSlide_CAD_001.jpg

                      As soon as it is completed I will upload it for other people's use as well. Currently I can not succeed in finding a free 3D model of an engine block so maybe I will have to draw one as well.

                      Regards
                      Johan

                      --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, keith gutshall <drpshops@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Hello Johan
                      > I have been kind of working on a 2X Gingery mill, and I have been useing steel shapes
                      > instead of castings.
                      >  I build machines when I am not turning wooden bowls.
                      >  You might want to look at some of the ideas in DRP  shops photo folders.
                      >  If they don't make ,build it.
                      >  
                      >  Keith
                      >
                      > Deep Run Portage
                      > Back Shop
                      > " The Lizard Works"
                      >
                      >
                      > ________________________________
                      > From: jcrous <jcrous1@...>
                      > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                      > Sent: Wednesday, November 9, 2011 11:26 AM
                      > Subject: [multimachine] Re: Table Plan wanted
                      >
                      >
                      >  
                      > Thank you Shannon,
                      > I appreciate the feedback.
                      >
                      > After I finished my work today, I had a idle moment and I thought about my wanted to be project.
                      >
                      > I took a chance and contacted Coastal Engineering. They sell a table of 195 X 555 mm ( +/- 8 X 22 " ) with a travel of 150 X 290 mm (+/- 6 X 12 ") of travel for R 2250.00 ( about $ 300.00). They have one shorter but wider model as well.
                      >
                      > Now this is affordable. I then found out that the original price I quoted: that company get their slides from the same importer.
                      >
                      > I am still researching now on the slide, but this will be now to make a vertical slide (here I like the Gingery mill one or the Multimachine) for either to lift/lower the spindle or to higher / lower the flat surface on which the X?Y table will be mounted.
                      >
                      > I already have a 1,1 kW single phase motor (Brand new with the choice or what direction you want the motor to go).
                      >
                      > So now the project is a go. I think on making a horizontal bench size mill where I will attempt to motorize the long axis of the table and with the option to add an overhead shaft like the multimachine, so that I will be able to support a mandrel. If plan it carefully I will make the overhead shaft so that I can fit a vertical spindle as well (Light work).
                      >
                      > However if I can get the right design I will attempt to make a vertical model from the start. I will then mount the spindle pulleys and motor like the Unimat as I don't like the Gingery design of pulleys (Cosmetic personal preference only). However I would like the project to appear as neat as possible to a commercial one as I can. I am planning to make the spindle with a MT3 so that I can use my existing ER24 collet chuck. I am also thinking of making a built-in coolant system as well.
                      >
                      > I know a lot of my friends and even my family think I am insane, but you guys on this forum proves that I am not alone in my thoughts.
                      >
                      > My first lathe was a Craftman with solid half inch mandrel, and the machine so mutilated that I had no screw cutting capabilities. After everybody said I was mad I proofed them wrong when I ended with a spindle of 17 mm inside opening and a 30 mm metric spindle thread. it worked. But the set-up to align the spindle parallel to the bed and the tailstock was a bastard.
                      >
                      > So I am now officially hunting for ideas and parts. I give my commitment to compile a full plan as well for this forum. Although some ideas will be stolen from other designs. Unfortunately I work in metric only.
                      >
                      > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Shannon DeWolfe <sdewolfe@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Howdy Johan,
                      > >
                      > > You have access to enough material to build just about any kind of table
                      > > you might want to build.
                      > >
                      > > Joe Romig provided us with several different methods of making slides,
                      > > tables, and cross slides.
                      > >
                      > > Look at his small bench mounted shaper for one of the heavier designs.
                      > > Mr. Romig specified using a casting but there is no reason why it could
                      > > not be a welded unit. You would have to true it after welding but that
                      > > would the case even if it were cast. The table is about 10 x 7 inches as
                      > > drawn but certainly could be enlarged. It has vertical positioning and
                      > > the design is strong.
                      > >
                      > > The small concrete reinforced bench size miller has a table that has x
                      > > travel of nearly a foot. Y travel is limited to half that. It is
                      > > designed to mount a rotating vise so work can be held in any position.
                      > > Knee travel on the drawing is 5 inches. Find the file
                      > > "machine_tool_slides-1.pdf in the Romig Designs group files area for the
                      > > slide design. That article describes the methods Mr. Romig used to make
                      > > flat slides that can be mounted to almost any surface or machine tool
                      > > with some adaptation.
                      > >
                      > > Mr. Romig's small lathes provide us with illustrations and methods to
                      > > achieve travel, work holding, rotation, and tool holding. One standalone
                      > > article is a short description of a tool holding slide with a travel of
                      > > one inch. It is made to fit a standard lantern post. He also described a
                      > > universal slide rest for small lathes that uses his flat slide design
                      > > mounted to a carriage that can be made to fit virtually any lathe ways.
                      > >
                      > > All of the mentioned articles are available at the Romig Designs group,
                      > > linked from at the bottom of each message.
                      > >
                      > > Regards,
                      > >
                      > > Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
                      > > --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 55 year old fat man.
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > On 11/8/2011 10:11 AM, jcrous wrote:
                      > > > I am looking for a plan on how to make a compound table yourself if
                      > > > such plans are available.
                      > >
                      >
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