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Re: [multimachine] Re: universal tool

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  • Shannon DeWolfe
    Howdy Dennis, I used Alt-PrtSc to capture the entire page. That was pasted into Irfanview. The region of interest was cut and pasted to a new canvas. It was
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 20, 2011
    Howdy Dennis,

    I used Alt-PrtSc to capture the entire page. That was pasted into Irfanview. The region of interest was cut and pasted to a new canvas. It was then resampled 300% larger, colors reduced to 256, gamma corrected to make the dark grays darker, sharpened, contrast and brightness manipulated, and finally saved at 72 dpi as PNG with 40% compression. That makes the file a little larger than I would like for web presentation but it renders pretty well once loaded. The attached picture is 490 Kb.

    Now that I can see the picture better, I can see that the shaper, which was not a part of the patent, is a completely different head. The head with the three way spindle is removed and the shaper assembly bolted on in it's place.

    On the miller, on the left of the column there is a slender rod extending diagonally from a pivot point on the horizontal arm behind the column to what looks like a gear mounted opposite to the main chain sprocket with the handle on it. Rotation of the handle will be coupled as a linear motion to the rocker assembly. The long slender rod on the bottom of the rocker, extending behind the column, will rock forward and back as the handle is turned. I cannot see what it is connected to behind the column. My guess is that it is fixed in a socket on that end. The pivot of the rocker appears to be a ratchet assembly that turns a gear under the main horizontal arm. I can't tell whether it is a screw or a rack gear but one or the other must be mounted to the main horizontal arm. The rocker would advance the cutter toward the front of the machine as the handle is turned.

    The depth of cut is controlled by the crank handle mounted on top of the head in front of the column. That is a major change to the patented machine. On the patent drawing, movement of the head was controlled by a rack in the head moved with a gear mounted to a long handle. The operator controlled the depth of cut by pulling down on the handle. The entire head was spring loaded so that when the handle was released the head returned to the top of the travel. On the production machine depth of cut is done with a crank handle on a lead screw. This change allows the operator to set and hold very fine depths of cut, changing the character of the machine from a drill press that can be made to mill to a true mill.

    The initial setup height is controlled by the the crank on top of the column. That screw must pass through a nut in the collar that mounts to the column. The entire assembly moves up and down the column.

    The shaper picture makes it much easier to see the movements. As the handle is pulled forward, the head moves forward to make the cut. On the return stroke, the ratchet mounted to the lead screw on the shaper ways moves the cutter to the side for the next cut.

    That is my explanation. I stand to be corrected as I am not certain of the milling motions.

    I have been searching the web looking for a better picture of the "complete workshop". No luck yet.
    Regards,
    
    Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
    --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 55 year old fat man.
    

    On 10/19/2011 12:52 PM, DennisF MacIntyre wrote:    I took a picture of the universal tool. I do not know how to transfer the pictures to the computer though.
  • DennisF MacIntyre
    Thank you Shannon     That picture does lead to some dreaming; it is so much clearer. I entered universal tool in search and one of the things that came up
    Message 2 of 8 , Oct 20, 2011
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      Thank you Shannon
          That picture does lead to some dreaming; it is so much clearer. I entered universal tool in search and one of the things that came up was multi track brackets from Rockler woodworking and Hardware for $17.99 . I don't know if that is U.S.  or Canuck.
       I wonder if there would be one of those machines in some museum. Perhaps one of our members would be near if we could find it.
      ta
      keep smiling 
      dennis mac
    • Shannon DeWolfe
      Patents are a great source of information once you find the word combination that finds the machine you are looking for. I followed the meager links generated
      Message 3 of 8 , Oct 21, 2011
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        Patents are a great source of information once you find the word
        combination that finds the machine you are looking for. I followed the
        meager links generated by "Compagne Manufacturiere Marcalex" and found
        that a man named Alexandre Schwob designed the shaper for the "Universal
        Machine Tool".

        This is a patent granted to Mr. Frank Van Duzen in 1900. The Combined
        Belt-Pulley and Spring consists of a spring loaded lever on a pulley to
        smooth "irregular motion" of a belted drive system. It is really a very
        ingenious device that applies pressure to the hub of the pulley, or
        relaxes tension when the clutch is engaged to allow a period of speed
        matching -- a soft start. This device was the basis of the mill and
        shaper speed control. It is referred to in Schwob's second patent:

        http://www.google.com/patents?id=nh52AAAAEBAJ&printsec=abstract&source=gbs_overview_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

        Matthieu Linotte's original patent for a "Hand Powered Universal Machine
        Tool". This was the precursor to the machine that was produced for sale:

        http://www.google.com/patents?id=Mz95AAAAEBAJ&pg=PA1&dq=1633714&source=gbs_selected_pages&cad=1#v=onepage&q&f=false

        This is the patent for the movement controls that made the shaper
        possible on the "complete workshop" in the photos. This was the
        application of Van Duzens's pulley to smooth the irregular motion of a
        hand powered machine. There are many improvements to Linotte's controls
        too. But the ability to make a more or less constant movement with a
        hand crank makes the shaper possible. The rockers for stepped movements
        are described in this patent. You have to be a patient reader. It took
        me three times through it, referring back to the drawings, to finally
        understand the chain of events. This patent was granted to Alexandre
        Schwob 25 years after Van Duzen's patent:

        http://www.google.com/patents?id=Mz95AAAAEBAJ&pg=PA1&dq=1633714&source=gbs_selected_pages&cad=1#v=onepage&q&f=false

        Improvements to the original patent filed by Alexandre Schwob. This is
        the part that replaced Van Duzen's invention with Schwob's "improved"
        design. Improved? Maybe so. This design was certainly more complicated.
        After several reads through, I still don't "see" the movements. This is
        not the same machine as in the picture of the Complete Workshop:

        http://www.google.com/patents?id=jshKAAAAEBAJ&printsec=description&zoom=4#v=onepage&q&f=false

        I am still looking for a "modern" picture of the machine. I may have to
        give it up. The little I know about it doesn't give me enough leads to
        follow.

        This post is getting too long. I deleted a bunch of commentary. I'll
        just ask the assembled minds here. Can we use this information to our
        advantage?


        Regards,

        Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
        --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 55 year old fat man.


        On 10/20/2011 10:07 PM, DennisF MacIntyre wrote:
        > That picture does lead to some dreaming
      • Pat Delany
        Three cheers for Shannon! ________________________________ From: Shannon DeWolfe To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday,
        Message 4 of 8 , Oct 21, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          Three cheers for Shannon!


          From: Shannon DeWolfe <sdewolfe@...>
          To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thursday, October 20, 2011 8:35 AM
          Subject: Re: [multimachine] Re: universal tool [1 Attachment]

           
          Howdy Dennis,

          I used Alt-PrtSc to capture the entire page. That was pasted into Irfanview. The region of interest was cut and pasted to a new canvas. It was then resampled 300% larger, colors reduced to 256, gamma corrected to make the dark grays darker, sharpened, contrast and brightness manipulated, and finally saved at 72 dpi as PNG with 40% compression. That makes the file a little larger than I would like for web presentation but it renders pretty well once loaded. The attached picture is 490 Kb.

          Now that I can see the picture better, I can see that the shaper, which was not a part of the patent, is a completely different head. The head with the three way spindle is removed and the shaper assembly bolted on in it's place.

          On the miller, on the left of the column there is a slender rod extending diagonally from a pivot point on the horizontal arm behind the column to what looks like a gear mounted opposite to the main chain sprocket with the handle on it. Rotation of the handle will be coupled as a linear motion to the rocker assembly. The long slender rod on the bottom of the rocker, extending behind the column, will rock forward and back as the handle is turned. I cannot see what it is connected to behind the column. My guess is that it is fixed in a socket on that end. The pivot of the rocker appears to be a ratchet assembly that turns a gear under the main horizontal arm. I can't tell whether it is a screw or a rack gear but one or the other must be mounted to the main horizontal arm. The rocker would advance the cutter toward the front of the machine as the handle is turned.

          The depth of cut is controlled by the crank handle mounted on top of the head in front of the column. That is a major change to the patented machine. On the patent drawing, movement of the head was controlled by a rack in the head moved with a gear mounted to a long handle. The operator controlled the depth of cut by pulling down on the handle. The entire head was spring loaded so that when the handle was released the head returned to the top of the travel. On the production machine depth of cut is done with a crank handle on a lead screw. This change allows the operator to set and hold very fine depths of cut, changing the character of the machine from a drill press that can be made to mill to a true mill.

          The initial setup height is controlled by the the crank on top of the column. That screw must pass through a nut in the collar that mounts to the column. The entire assembly moves up and down the column.

          The shaper picture makes it much easier to see the movements. As the handle is pulled forward, the head moves forward to make the cut. On the return stroke, the ratchet mounted to the lead screw on the shaper ways moves the cutter to the side for the next cut.

          That is my explanation. I stand to be corrected as I am not certain of the milling motions.

          I have been searching the web looking for a better picture of the "complete workshop". No luck yet.
          Regards,
          
          Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
          --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 55 year old fat man.
          

          On 10/19/2011 12:52 PM, DennisF MacIntyre wrote:
             I took a picture of the universal tool. I do not know how to transfer the pictures to the computer though.


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