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Re: [multimachine] Re: Pipe sizes in Europe

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  • Jose Manuel Luis
    Unless you use a taper accessorie in your lathe. But you can make straigth threads and use teflon tape or something similar to make it leak proof. You have to
    Message 1 of 14 , Oct 1, 2011
      Unless you use a taper accessorie in your lathe.
      But you can make straigth threads and use teflon tape or something similar to make it leak proof. You have to use it anyway even if the threads are tapered. But you have to be more cautious not to overthigth the accessorie to avoid breaking it.
      Ideally and to be "by the book" they should be tapered but 100% of the threads I see done by the local machinist are straigth.
       
      Jose 

      From: costasv
      Sent: Saturday, October 01, 2011 5:32 AM
      Subject: [multimachine] Re: Pipe sizes in Europe

       

      Hi Dennis
      Normally, plumbing threads are made tapered .That is,plumber's tools are doing this kind of threads.If you machine these threads on the lathe, they are straight.
      Costas

      --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, DennisF MacIntyre <a1g2r3i@...> wrote:

      >
      > Dear Costas
      >
      These pipes you are referring to, that use the imperial system of measurement, do they use a tapered thread or a straight thread with an "O" ring and a shoulder?
      > keep smiling
      > dennis mac
      >

    • Pierre Coueffin
      Interesting... I ve always thought that our local system where a 1 pipe has no 1 dimension anywhere, was a terrible compromise. But at least changing the
      Message 2 of 14 , Oct 3, 2011
        Interesting... I've always thought that our local system where a 1" pipe has no 1" dimension anywhere, was a terrible compromise.  But at least changing the pipe thickness while maintaining the OD at least maintains compatibility of all the fittings.

        An awful lot of non plumbing things use a 1" NPT thread to attach pipe... I have a set of hydraulic jacks that use pipe "extensions"...

        On Fri, Sep 30, 2011 at 9:51 PM, costasv <cvgoodphones317@...> wrote:

        at least in our country,and in all Balkans, a 1" plumbers water pipe, has a 1" external diameter.The problem is , that with the years, they started reducing their thickness .So now we have yellow, red, and green labeled tubes.The best one is green labeled, but depends from the factory .For a professional work, I'm using only green labeled tubes, and from well known producer.Yellow labeled is used only for not water applications since they are too thick.


      • Jose Manuel Luis
        Well I guess there s a misunderstanding somewhere, the 1 is ID and not OD. A 1 plumbing pipe or tube or whatever you call it in english has 33.7mm OD and a
        Message 3 of 14 , Oct 3, 2011
          Well I guess there's a misunderstanding somewhere, the 1" is ID and not OD.
          A 1" plumbing pipe or tube or whatever you call it in english has 33.7mm OD and a thickness os 3.2mm, a 2" plumbing pipe has 60.3mm OD and 3.6mm tickness and so on. That way a plumber can open threads in every 1" pipes regardless of their thickness. We also have here the "Light ", "Medium" and "Reinforced" kind of plumbing or "iron"pipes as we call it, the OD is the same but the tickness changes. You shouldn't open a thread in "Ligth" kind of pipes because they're too thin and the thread will almost cut througth it's wall.
          If you make the math you'll see that the 1" has 27.3mm ID, I don't know why, I guess this is because the reinforced has 33.7mm OD and 4.05 wall thickness which gives us an ID of 25.6mm. So they have the math done for the reinforced series, I think.
          Steel and Stainlees steel pipes are in mm and measured OD, an 1/2" Stainless steel pipes is called a: 21.3x2.6mm pipe and so on. There's charts with these sizes.
           
          Hope this will help.
           
          Jose.
           

          Sent: Monday, October 03, 2011 6:34 PM
          Subject: Re: [multimachine] Re: Pipe sizes in Europe

           

          Interesting... I've always thought that our local system where a 1" pipe has no 1" dimension anywhere, was a terrible compromise.  But at least changing the pipe thickness while maintaining the OD at least maintains compatibility of all the fittings.

          An awful lot of non plumbing things use a 1" NPT thread to attach pipe... I have a set of hydraulic jacks that use pipe "extensions"...

          On Fri, Sep 30, 2011 at 9:51 PM, costasv <cvgoodphones317@...> wrote:

          at least in our country,and in all Balkans, a 1" plumbers water pipe, has a 1" external diameter.The problem is , that with the years, they started reducing their thickness .So now we have yellow, red, and green labeled tubes.The best one is green labeled, but depends from the factory .For a professional work, I'm using only green labeled tubes, and from well known producer.Yellow labeled is used only for not water applications since they are too thick.


        • Pat Delany
          Really confused now! What I was doing was to design a desktop lathe based on the snug fit of 1 pipe when slipped over 3/4 pipe ways. I would really like to
          Message 4 of 14 , Oct 3, 2011
            Really confused now! What I was doing was to design a desktop lathe based on the snug fit of 1" pipe when slipped over 3/4" pipe ways. I would really like to know how universal this is. Many of you will recognize that the idea comes from the WW2 "slam bang" 12 ga. shotgun. 
            I wonder if chrome plated pipe is exactly the same size as standard pipe? Maybe a moot question since the 1" pipe is split anyway and could be opened or closed a little.

            This could be a very cool screw cutting lathe easily built for almost nothing!

            Pat


            From: Jose Manuel Luis <zmdluis@...>
            To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Monday, October 3, 2011 3:48 PM
            Subject: Re: [multimachine] Re: Pipe sizes in Europe

             
            Well I guess there's a misunderstanding somewhere, the 1" is ID and not OD.
            A 1" plumbing pipe or tube or whatever you call it in english has 33.7mm OD and a thickness os 3.2mm, a 2" plumbing pipe has 60.3mm OD and 3.6mm tickness and so on. That way a plumber can open threads in every 1" pipes regardless of their thickness. We also have here the "Light ", "Medium" and "Reinforced" kind of plumbing or "iron"pipes as we call it, the OD is the same but the tickness changes. You shouldn't open a thread in "Ligth" kind of pipes because they're too thin and the thread will almost cut througth it's wall.
            If you make the math you'll see that the 1" has 27.3mm ID, I don't know why, I guess this is because the reinforced has 33.7mm OD and 4.05 wall thickness which gives us an ID of 25.6mm. So they have the math done for the reinforced series, I think.
            Steel and Stainlees steel pipes are in mm and measured OD, an 1/2" Stainless steel pipes is called a: 21.3x2.6mm pipe and so on. There's charts with these sizes.
             
            Hope this will help.
             
            Jose.
             

            Sent: Monday, October 03, 2011 6:34 PM
            Subject: Re: [multimachine] Re: Pipe sizes in Europe

             
            Interesting... I've always thought that our local system where a 1" pipe has no 1" dimension anywhere, was a terrible compromise.  But at least changing the pipe thickness while maintaining the OD at least maintains compatibility of all the fittings.

            An awful lot of non plumbing things use a 1" NPT thread to attach pipe... I have a set of hydraulic jacks that use pipe "extensions"...

            On Fri, Sep 30, 2011 at 9:51 PM, costasv <cvgoodphones317@...> wrote:
            at least in our country,and in all Balkans, a 1" plumbers water pipe, has a 1" external diameter.The problem is , that with the years, they started reducing their thickness .So now we have yellow, red, and green labeled tubes.The best one is green labeled, but depends from the factory .For a professional work, I'm using only green labeled tubes, and from well known producer.Yellow labeled is used only for not water applications since they are too thick.



          • Jack Coats
            Wikipedia has an interesting article on Nominal Pipe Sizes and wall thickness Schedule numbers. Most of the dimensions are listed in both inches and mm ....
            Message 5 of 14 , Oct 3, 2011
              Wikipedia has an interesting article on Nominal Pipe Sizes and wall thickness Schedule numbers.  Most of the dimensions are listed in both inches and mm ....


              The article also mentioned that for tubing (vs pipe) the OD is the same as the stated size.  For pipe that is not the case.  Tubing is supposed to have tighter engineering requirements that pipe.

              It seems the European standard for Nominal Pipe size is DN (A French term translated as Nominal Diameter).  The ND of pipes are also noted in the Wikipedia article above.

              I don't consider Wikipedia a canonical source of information, but it is not a bad first blush at finding base reference data.

              I hope this helps some.  ...  Jack
            • Jose Manuel Luis
              Hello. I ll try to scan a table with the nominal size and the diameter of pipes and post it on the list. Jose. From: Jack Coats Sent: Monday, October 03, 2011
              Message 6 of 14 , Oct 3, 2011
                Hello.
                I'll try to scan a table with the nominal size and the diameter of pipes and post it on the list.
                 
                Jose. 

                Sent: Monday, October 03, 2011 11:16 PM
                Subject: Re: [multimachine] Re: Pipe sizes in Europe

                 

                Wikipedia has an interesting article on Nominal Pipe Sizes and wall thickness Schedule numbers.  Most of the dimensions are listed in both inches and mm ....



                The article also mentioned that for tubing (vs pipe) the OD is the same as the stated size.  For pipe that is not the case.  Tubing is supposed to have tighter engineering requirements that pipe.

                It seems the European standard for Nominal Pipe size is DN (A French term translated as Nominal Diameter).  The ND of pipes are also noted in the Wikipedia article above.

                I don't consider Wikipedia a canonical source of information, but it is not a bad first blush at finding base reference data.

                I hope this helps some.  ...  Jack

              • Jose Manuel Luis
                http://dl.dropbox.com/u/6917112/Cat%C3%A1logo%20Estrutural%20-%20Chagas%5B1%5D.pdf Here s the link to a catalog with a lot of tech data about pipes, flat bars,
                Message 7 of 14 , Oct 3, 2011
                   
                  Here's the link to a catalog with a lot of tech data about pipes, flat bars, corners, sheet metal plates, etc..
                  Hope you'll find it useful in spite of beeing in Portuguese, nice time to learn a few technical terms in " a língua de Camões" Piscar o olho Ícone Expressivo.
                  But the DIN norms and the abreviations are all the same in Portuguese or English.
                  It is on my dropbox folder but it is not a copyrigth material, it can be downloaded freely from the seller's site, it is not an ilegal download in any way.
                   
                   
                  Jose
                   
                   

                  Sent: Monday, October 03, 2011 10:19 PM
                  Subject: Re: [multimachine] Re: Pipe sizes in Europe

                   

                  Really confused now! What I was doing was to design a desktop lathe based on the snug fit of 1" pipe when slipped over 3/4" pipe ways. I would really like to know how universal this is. Many of you will recognize that the idea comes from the WW2 "slam bang" 12 ga. shotgun. 
                  I wonder if chrome plated pipe is exactly the same size as standard pipe? Maybe a moot question since the 1" pipe is split anyway and could be opened or closed a little.

                  This could be a very cool screw cutting lathe easily built for almost nothing!

                  Pat


                  From: Jose Manuel Luis <zmdluis@...>
                  To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Monday, October 3, 2011 3:48 PM
                  Subject: Re: [multimachine] Re: Pipe sizes in Europe

                   
                  Well I guess there's a misunderstanding somewhere, the 1" is ID and not OD.
                  A 1" plumbing pipe or tube or whatever you call it in english has 33.7mm OD and a thickness os 3.2mm, a 2" plumbing pipe has 60.3mm OD and 3.6mm tickness and so on. That way a plumber can open threads in every 1" pipes regardless of their thickness. We also have here the "Light ", "Medium" and "Reinforced" kind of plumbing or "iron"pipes as we call it, the OD is the same but the tickness changes. You shouldn't open a thread in "Ligth" kind of pipes because they're too thin and the thread will almost cut througth it's wall.
                  If you make the math you'll see that the 1" has 27.3mm ID, I don't know why, I guess this is because the reinforced has 33.7mm OD and 4.05 wall thickness which gives us an ID of 25.6mm. So they have the math done for the reinforced series, I think.
                  Steel and Stainlees steel pipes are in mm and measured OD, an 1/2" Stainless steel pipes is called a: 21.3x2.6mm pipe and so on. There's charts with these sizes.
                   
                  Hope this will help.
                   
                  Jose.
                   

                  Sent: Monday, October 03, 2011 6:34 PM
                  Subject: Re: [multimachine] Re: Pipe sizes in Europe

                   
                  Interesting... I've always thought that our local system where a 1" pipe has no 1" dimension anywhere, was a terrible compromise.  But at least changing the pipe thickness while maintaining the OD at least maintains compatibility of all the fittings.

                  An awful lot of non plumbing things use a 1" NPT thread to attach pipe... I have a set of hydraulic jacks that use pipe "extensions"...

                  On Fri, Sep 30, 2011 at 9:51 PM, costasv <cvgoodphones317@...> wrote:
                  at least in our country,and in all Balkans, a 1" plumbers water pipe, has a 1" external diameter.The problem is , that with the years, they started reducing their thickness .So now we have yellow, red, and green labeled tubes.The best one is green labeled, but depends from the factory .For a professional work, I'm using only green labeled tubes, and from well known producer.Yellow labeled is used only for not water applications since they are too thick.



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