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Re: Precursors

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  • costasv
    Hi I do not know if it is suitable to use pillow bearings for this purpose ,or to use something other like a 4 Bolt Flange Bearings, because of the axial
    Message 1 of 26 , Aug 1, 2011
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      Hi
      I do not know if it is suitable to use pillow bearings for this purpose ,or to use something other like a 4 Bolt Flange Bearings, because of the axial loads of the lathe work to be supported.
      In the second solution, some thrust bearing could be arranged somehow to support axial loads too.In this case the lathe headstock can have a closed square form bolted down to the lathe base (or to the lathe ways)with some large 18-20 mm screws.
      (Like these large square tubes 20X20cm used in building constructions).
      Of course an other problem could be the hedstock alignment, but this can be easelly made with a low cost laser pointer for less than 20.00 USD.



      --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "David G. LeVine" <dlevine@...> wrote:
      >
      > On 07/31/2011 03:46 PM, costasv wrote:
      > > Hi Keith
      > > Some more questions:
      > > How much costed these two 2" pillow bearings?
      > > You have fixed the tube spindle on them only with their set-screws?No any machining of some kind of ring to be arc welded on the spindle?
      > > This heavy flange that you saying ,here can be found only with four holes. Ok I can made one in my MM , from a bare stock.,but the others are cheap.
      > > And finally an other problem, is that everywhere in the wolrld, water tubes are in your imperial system,(inches), but it is very difficult to find large pillow blocks in this system.So, some machining is necessary.
      > > Oh I forgot that it is possible to find pipes of "Mannessman"type,that is without welding line, in metric diameters, black, not zinc plated, these used for heating installations.
      > > Costas
      >
      > You might look at DOM tubing. It is within 0.006"-0.007" (0.15 mm) from
      > the factory and is seamless. 2" with 1/2" wall tubing (roughly 51 mm
      > with 12.7mm walls) is not cheap (about $40/foot USD
      > <http://www.onlinemetals.com/merchant.cfm?pid=9735&step=4&showunits=inches&id=283&top_cat=197>),
      > but it is easy to get.
      >
      > 2" pipe is actually 2.375" OD, DOM
      > <http://www.onlinemetals.com/merchant.cfm?pid=15558&step=4&showunits=inches&id=283&top_cat=197>
      > that size with 0.313" thick walls (roughly 8 mm) is not that hard to find.
      >
      > Pillow blocks for 2" pipe are listed as in stock at Burden's Surplus
      > Center
      > <http://www.surpluscenter.com/item.asp?item=1-212-38-P-C&catname=powerTrans>
      > and for 2 inch DOM are listed by Northern Tool
      > <http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200407612_200407612>.
      >
      > Regarding the flanges, plumbing supply houses seem to have a variety of
      > them for welding to high pressure piping as well as for threading onto pipe.
      >
      > Does that help?
      >
      > Dave 8{)
      >
    • David G. LeVine
      ... Pillow blocks like that are rated for 2-3 tons of load radially, NO wood lathe will ever get that high until the workpiece is well over a foot (1/3 m) in
      Message 2 of 26 , Aug 1, 2011
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        On 08/01/2011 04:48 AM, costasv wrote:
        > Hi
        > I do not know if it is suitable to use pillow bearings for this purpose ,or to use something other like a 4 Bolt Flange Bearings, because of the axial loads of the lathe work to be supported.
        > In the second solution, some thrust bearing could be arranged somehow to support axial loads too.In this case the lathe headstock can have a closed square form bolted down to the lathe base (or to the lathe ways)with some large 18-20 mm screws.
        > (Like these large square tubes 20X20cm used in building constructions).
        > Of course an other problem could be the hedstock alignment, but this can be easelly made with a low cost laser pointer for less than 20.00 USD.

        Pillow blocks like that are rated for 2-3 tons of load radially, NO wood
        lathe will ever get that high until the workpiece is well over a foot
        (1/3 m) in radius. Generally, the rule of thumb is that "Normal ball
        bearing pillow block bearings can carry thrust loads. If the thrust is
        less than 20% of the dynamic load rating of the bearing you probably
        don't have to worry. If it's more than that you should go thru[sic] the
        procedure in the bearing mfr's[sic] catalog to calculate the equivalent
        load using your anticipated radial and thrust loads." (from
        http://www.craftkb.com/Uwe/Forum.aspx/metalworking/33729/thrust-bearings) and
        other references recommend preloads of at least 150 pounds to prevent
        slipping (which causes premature wear.)

        Assuming you can survive with only 400-600 pounds on the end (182-273
        KG), you are probably safe with life at only a million hours or so. Of
        course, if BOTH bearings can handle the axial load, double that number.
        I would bet the bearings will both be able to accept part of the load.

        A Jet JML1014 (10" diameter by 14" usable bed length) uses a 6005 and a
        6004 ball bearing for the spindle. The 6005 has a 6,000 Newton (roughly
        1,359 pounds) load rating and the 6004 has a 5,000 Newton (roughly 1,125
        pounds) rating. They tend to be sufficient for wood turning of up to
        10" objects. They should see no more than 270 and 225 pounds of axial
        load respectively. This is WAY below what a 2"+ pillow block can handle.

        Actually, I would opt for a truck spindle assembly, preferably a "full
        floating" spindle. Pull the axle and you have an open bore, the
        bearings run on a tube. Those can take shock loads in the 50 TON range
        with no damage and often run many miles loaded to 10,000 pounds or more.

        Using the disk brake rotor reversed (the "top hat" allows that) means
        that you get a face plate which can take a big workpiece with no
        machining and a large through hole. You will probably need to seal the
        bearings (to prevent chips from working their way into the bearings),
        but that is likely to be pretty simple. The preload adjuster is built in!

        Dave 8{)
      • costasv
        Thank you Dave for this reply So, for a metal lathe, pillow bearings are not the first choice to be used. Maybe Pat s idea to use a small machine block is the
        Message 3 of 26 , Aug 1, 2011
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          Thank you Dave for this reply
          So, for a metal lathe, pillow bearings are not the first choice to be used.
          Maybe Pat's idea to use a small machine block is the best low cost solution for headstock construction.And as for the rest, we can use Keith's ideas for be and ways cnstruction.
          Only we must see how to tie them together.
          And all of this, in a try to have a minimum cost .
          Costas


          --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "David G. LeVine" <dlevine@...> wrote:
          >
          > On 08/01/2011 04:48 AM, costasv wrote:
          > > Hi
          > > I do not know if it is suitable to use pillow bearings for this purpose ,or to use something other like a 4 Bolt Flange Bearings, because of the axial loads of the lathe work to be supported.
          > > In the second solution, some thrust bearing could be arranged somehow to support axial loads too.In this case the lathe headstock can have a closed square form bolted down to the lathe base (or to the lathe ways)with some large 18-20 mm screws.
          > > (Like these large square tubes 20X20cm used in building constructions).
          > > Of course an other problem could be the hedstock alignment, but this can be easelly made with a low cost laser pointer for less than 20.00 USD.
          >
          > Pillow blocks like that are rated for 2-3 tons of load radially, NO wood
          > lathe will ever get that high until the workpiece is well over a foot
          > (1/3 m) in radius. Generally, the rule of thumb is that "Normal ball
          > bearing pillow block bearings can carry thrust loads. If the thrust is
          > less than 20% of the dynamic load rating of the bearing you probably
          > don't have to worry. If it's more than that you should go thru[sic] the
          > procedure in the bearing mfr's[sic] catalog to calculate the equivalent
          > load using your anticipated radial and thrust loads." (from
          > http://www.craftkb.com/Uwe/Forum.aspx/metalworking/33729/thrust-bearings) and
          > other references recommend preloads of at least 150 pounds to prevent
          > slipping (which causes premature wear.)
          >
          > Assuming you can survive with only 400-600 pounds on the end (182-273
          > KG), you are probably safe with life at only a million hours or so. Of
          > course, if BOTH bearings can handle the axial load, double that number.
          > I would bet the bearings will both be able to accept part of the load.
          >
          > A Jet JML1014 (10" diameter by 14" usable bed length) uses a 6005 and a
          > 6004 ball bearing for the spindle. The 6005 has a 6,000 Newton (roughly
          > 1,359 pounds) load rating and the 6004 has a 5,000 Newton (roughly 1,125
          > pounds) rating. They tend to be sufficient for wood turning of up to
          > 10" objects. They should see no more than 270 and 225 pounds of axial
          > load respectively. This is WAY below what a 2"+ pillow block can handle.
          >
          > Actually, I would opt for a truck spindle assembly, preferably a "full
          > floating" spindle. Pull the axle and you have an open bore, the
          > bearings run on a tube. Those can take shock loads in the 50 TON range
          > with no damage and often run many miles loaded to 10,000 pounds or more.
          >
          > Using the disk brake rotor reversed (the "top hat" allows that) means
          > that you get a face plate which can take a big workpiece with no
          > machining and a large through hole. You will probably need to seal the
          > bearings (to prevent chips from working their way into the bearings),
          > but that is likely to be pretty simple. The preload adjuster is built in!
          >
          > Dave 8{)
          >
        • David G. LeVine
          ... You are entirely welcome. ... Correct, but they might be A choice. Two inch plus bearings will be expensive and may have problems in a short time (6
          Message 4 of 26 , Aug 2, 2011
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            On 08/02/2011 01:52 AM, costasv wrote:
            > Thank you Dave for this reply

            You are entirely welcome.

            > So, for a metal lathe, pillow bearings are not the first choice to be used.

            Correct, but they might be A choice. Two inch plus bearings will be
            expensive and may have problems in a short time (6 months or so.)

            > Maybe Pat's idea to use a small machine block is the best low cost solution for headstock construction.And as for the rest, we can use Keith's ideas for be and ways cnstruction.

            The real answer is angular contact bearings, tapered roller bearings or
            a thrust bearing, if rolling element bearings are desired. If not,
            tapered bushings make more sense. The problem with pillow blocks is
            that they are designed for MOSTLY radial loads, until you get to tapered
            roller pillow blocks or preloaded angular contact pair pillow blocks,
            and those make normal pillow blocks look cheap.

            > Only we must see how to tie them together.

            Not really, Pat described it a long time ago. The original MM had a
            very elegant system. Another choice is (as mentioned), a "free
            floating" spindle or axle. The bearings are preloaded so it is
            basically a single unit.

            > And all of this, in a try to have a minimum cost .
            > Costas

            Aye, there's the rub!

            Dave 8{)
          • zaphod
            ... Please clarify exactly what you mean here. You mean take the full axle off the truck and use both its bearings as radial supports to the running axle which
            Message 5 of 26 , Aug 2, 2011
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              > Actually, I would opt for a truck spindle assembly, preferably a "full
              > floating" spindle. Pull the axle and you have an open bore, the
              > bearings run on a tube. Those can take shock loads in the 50 TON range
              > with no damage and often run many miles loaded to 10,000 pounds or more.
              >
              > Using the disk brake rotor reversed (the "top hat" allows that) means
              > that you get a face plate which can take a big workpiece with no
              > machining and a large through hole. You will probably need to seal the
              > bearings (to prevent chips from working their way into the bearings),
              > but that is likely to be pretty simple. The preload adjuster is built in!

              Please clarify exactly what you mean here. You mean take the full axle off the truck and use both its bearings as radial supports to the running axle which becomes a hollow spindle, with the brake rotor at one end reversed to become a face plate? What takes up the axial thrust and what adjusts the tension? Do you have a picture or diagram of this please I have never taken apart an axle assembly.
            • David G. LeVine
              ... Sure, look at the 12 inch spindle shown at http://arrc.epnet.com/autoapp/9102/9102CH07_REAR_AXLE.htm figure 13. The full floating axle has the bearings
              Message 6 of 26 , Aug 3, 2011
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                On 08/02/2011 10:18 PM, zaphod wrote:
                Please clarify exactly what you mean here. 

                Sure, look at the 12 inch spindle shown at http://arrc.epnet.com/autoapp/9102/9102CH07_REAR_AXLE.htm figure 13.  The full floating axle has the bearings OUTSIDE the tube and the axle inside, if the axle breaks, the wheels don't fall off.  Also, because the bearings are on the outside of the tube, the axle capacity (weight rating) is much higher.

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                Part #75 is the axle housing, cut it off between the bracket and differential, it is how one holds the spindle.

                Discard part 74, the axle.

                Note that part 82 (the brake disk) is offset far from the end with part 72, 90, etc.  It mounts to part 86, the hub, via wheel studs, part 77, and nuts.  By reversing it it SHOULD extend beyond the end of the hub, if it doesn't, add spacers.

                Parts 87, 88, 89, etc. adjust the preload on the bearings, this requires a special socket.


                You mean take the full axle off the truck and use both its bearings as radial supports to the running axle which becomes a hollow spindle, with the brake rotor at one end reversed to become a face plate? 

                Close, just one spindle and hub becomes both the radial and axial supports, the rest is discarded.  The brake rotor is reversed to become a face plate or mount a chuck.

                What takes up the axial thrust and what adjusts the tension? 

                Parts 87-90 screw onto the axle housing (part 75) and adjust the play. 

                Do you have a picture or diagram of this please I have never taken apart an axle assembly. 
                

                Yup, included in the message, along with a link, BUT beware and disable Javascript before loading it if you want to copy it or want your browser to work properly, otherwise a system restart after loading the page may be needed.

                This applies ONLY to full floating axles, most automotive axles are not full floating.  The best ones would be the full floaters from big military AWD truck front ends (like a "deuce and a half".)  Those are sealed and the disassembly is easier for what we are discussing.  Even FWD trucks (like the big pickups and SUVs) may not be full floating axles, many are semi-floating in the front.

                You will need to fabricate a shield and/or seals to prevent chips from getting to the bearings.  Spindles like these are designed for low speeds, tires only go 800 revolutions per mile (or 800 RPM at 60 MPH) for passenger cars and half that (or less) for big trucks.

                Dave  8{)
              • DennisF MacIntyre
                I have suggested this approach a few times in the past. With the new yahoo I have not yet figured how to do a search for the old posts.  With a full floating
                Message 7 of 26 , Aug 3, 2011
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                  I have suggested this approach a few times in the past. With the new yahoo I have not yet figured how to do a search for the old posts.  With a full floating axle on a multi axle truck, the driving axle shaft can be pulled out. stuff a rag in and still drive the truck from the other axles. To use it as a spindle, just think of what turns on the truck will now be stationary and what was stationary on the vehicle will now rotate.
                  keep smiling
                  dennis mac

                  From: David G. LeVine <dlevine@...>
                  To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Wednesday, August 3, 2011 10:32:40 AM
                  Subject: Re: [multimachine] Re: Precursors

                  On 08/02/2011 10:18 PM, zaphod wrote:
                  Please clarify exactly what you mean here. 

                  Sure, look at the 12 inch spindle shown at http://arrc.epnet.com/autoapp/9102/9102CH07_REAR_AXLE.htm figure 13.  The full floating axle has the bearings OUTSIDE the tube and the axle inside, if the axle breaks, the wheels don't fall off.  Also, because the bearings are on the outside of the tube, the axle capacity (weight rating) is much higher.

                  Warning!  Loading this image will mess with your browser and may require a system restart!  Disable Javascript before loading it if you want to copy it.
                  Warning! Loading this image will mess with your browser and
may require a system restart! Disable Javascript if you want to
coopy it.
                  Warning!  Loading this image will mess with your browser and may require a system restart!  Disable Javascript before loading it if you want to copy it.

                  Part #75 is the axle housing, cut it off between the bracket and differential, it is how one holds the spindle.

                  Discard part 74, the axle.

                  Note that part 82 (the brake disk) is offset far from the end with part 72, 90, etc.  It mounts to part 86, the hub, via wheel studs, part 77, and nuts.  By reversing it it SHOULD extend beyond the end of the hub, if it doesn't, add spacers.

                  Parts 87, 88, 89, etc. adjust the preload on the bearings, this requires a special socket.


                  You mean take the full axle off the truck and use both its bearings as radial supports to the running axle which becomes a hollow spindle, with the brake rotor at one end reversed to become a face plate? 

                  Close, just one spindle and hub becomes both the radial and axial supports, the rest is discarded.  The brake rotor is reversed to become a face plate or mount a chuck.

                  What takes up the axial thrust and what adjusts the tension? 

                  Parts 87-90 screw onto the axle housing (part 75) and adjust the play. 

                  Do you have a picture or diagram of this please I have never taken apart an axle assembly. 
                  

                  Yup, included in the message, along with a link, BUT beware and disable Javascript before loading it if you want to copy it or want your browser to work properly, otherwise a system restart after loading the page may be needed.

                  This applies ONLY to full floating axles, most automotive axles are not full floating.  The best ones would be the full floaters from big military AWD truck front ends (like a "deuce and a half".)  Those are sealed and the disassembly is easier for what we are discussing.  Even FWD trucks (like the big pickups and SUVs) may not be full floating axles, many are semi-floating in the front.

                  You will need to fabricate a shield and/or seals to prevent chips from getting to the bearings.  Spindles like these are designed for low speeds, tires only go 800 revolutions per mile (or 800 RPM at 60 MPH) for passenger cars and half that (or less) for big trucks.

                  Dave  8{)


                • keith gutshall
                  Hi David Where do you find the short 25-30 in belts? Most of the car belts are way to long for the short centers of a machine.   Keith Deep Run Portage Back
                  Message 8 of 26 , Aug 6, 2011
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                    Hi David
                    Where do you find the short 25-30 in belts?
                    Most of the car belts are way to long for the short centers of a machine.
                     
                    Keith
                     
                    Deep Run Portage
                    Back Shop
                    " The Lizard Works"
                    From: David G. LeVine <dlevine@...>
                    To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Saturday, July 30, 2011 8:50 PM
                    Subject: Re: [multimachine] Re: Precursors

                     
                    On 07/30/2011 03:55 PM, keith gutshall wrote:
                     The expenive part was the pulley for the large shaft.

                    Why bother?  An automotive "serpentine" belt inside out will drive it well enough directly on the pipe.  The pulley for the motor can be turned in place since it is round and only slightly convex.  You will NEED a tensioner and it would help to clean up the pipe before running it too long.

                    For a real MM, turning the grooves for the serpentine belt would be a good idea.  The included angle is 40° or 41°, IIRC.  For the motor, an alternator pulley and a bushing should do the trick, or mount the alternator pulley on the jackshaft.

                    Serpentine belts have lower losses than V belts and can handle more torque.  The tensioner ideally should be on the side which comes off the drive since the other side is tensioned by drive torque.

                    Dave  8{)


                  • keith gutshall
                    Hi Costas Sory for the delay in getting back with you. I have been in the hospitial for a couple of days. My heart was acting up,It got an irregular rethuem.
                    Message 9 of 26 , Aug 6, 2011
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                      Hi Costas
                      Sory for the delay in getting back with you.
                      I have been in the hospitial for a couple of days.
                      My heart was acting up,It got an irregular rethuem.
                       
                      The pillow blocks were $30 USDeach when I got the from the
                      Surplus Center,.
                      Ijust used the set screws to hold the shaft when I assembled
                      it about 4 years ago.
                      The flanges come with 4 holes,but they are not needed for any thing,
                      seeing they do not line up to anything.
                       
                      The pipe when I got it was oversize to fit the bearing and it did
                      need to be machined to fit the bearing.
                      The differance between the pipe OD 2.375 for us size and metric
                      60MM is only about 0.013-0.014 of an inch.
                       
                      The pillow block will handle a axial load about %50 of the radial
                      load.
                       
                      Keith
                       
                      Deep Run Portage
                      Back Shop
                      " The Lizard Works"
                      From: costasv <cvgoodphones317@...>
                      To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Sunday, July 31, 2011 2:46 PM
                      Subject: [multimachine] Re: Precursors

                       
                      Hi Keith
                      Some more questions:
                      How much costed these two 2" pillow bearings?
                      You have fixed the tube spindle on them only with their set-screws?No any machining of some kind of ring to be arc welded on the spindle?
                      This heavy flange that you saying ,here can be found only with four holes. Ok I can made one in my MM , from a bare stock.,but the others are cheap.
                      And finally an other problem, is that everywhere in the wolrld, water tubes are in your imperial system,(inches), but it is very difficult to find large pillow blocks in this system.So, some machining is necessary.
                      Oh I forgot that it is possible to find pipes of "Mannessman"type,that is without welding line, in metric diameters, black, not zinc plated, these used for heating installations.
                      Costas

                      --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, keith gutshall <drpshops@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Hi Costas
                      > I just used a 2in pipe,with a heavy cast iron flange on it.
                      > A 2 inch pipe is 2.375(60mm)in diameter,with the pillow
                      > blocks ,I just need a smooth spindle to fit the ID of the bearings.
                      > The flange uses the pipe threads to hold it on.The flange
                      > was large enought to turn 6in (150mm) flange.
                      >  I had to put a large plate on it to fit the 8in (200mm)
                      > chuck.If you use a 6 in chuck you can just turn a sholder
                      > on the correct size for the inside of the chuck.
                      >  
                      >  The expenive part was the pulley for the large shaft.
                      >  
                      > The pipe shaft ,if you decide to use it ,shold be a piece of
                      > sch#80 pipe to get the stiffness.
                      >  
                      >  There is a problem with this type of spindle,you cannot
                      > remove th chuck. to put a other on on the spindle.
                      >
                       You will lose the trueness of the chuck.
                      > Keith
                      >
                      > Deep Run Portage
                      > Back Shop
                      > " The Lizard Works"
                      >
                      > From: costasv <cvgoodphones317@...>
                      > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                      > Sent: Wednesday, July 27, 2011 12:14 PM
                      > Subject: [multimachine] Re: Precursors
                      >
                      >
                      >  
                      > Hi Keith
                      > Can you exolane a litle more about building spindles?
                      > I remenber it was the most priced part whem I build my MM
                      > Costas
                      >
                      > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, keith gutshall <drpshops@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Hi David
                      > >  Building a wood lathe
                      worked for me.
                      > >  The parts for it can be reused for the bigger machine.
                      > >  I used the one I have to make the spindle for the metal lathe I have.
                      > >  With a long enought bed you could make most of the parts,wood
                      > > or metal.
                      > > Look in drpshops #2 photo folder for more ideas.
                      > >  
                      > >  Keith
                      > >
                      > > Deep Run Portage
                      > > Back Shop
                      > > " The Lizard Works"
                      > >
                      > > From: David G. LeVine <dlevine@>
                      > > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                      > > Sent: Tuesday, July 26, 2011 8:15 PM
                      > > Subject: [multimachine] Precursors
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >  
                      > > As precursors to metalworking tools,
                      would it be wise to discuss making
                      > > a wood lathe?
                      > >
                      > > Having wooden dowels and shafts might make getting to metalworking
                      > > easier. For example, use of wooden, grease impregnated bearings was
                      > > discussed for the multimachine at one time, being able to turn the
                      > > bearings to size might be really handy.
                      > >
                      > > Comments gracelessly accepted.
                      > >
                      > > Dave 8{)
                      > >
                      >



                    • Pat
                      Since we are talking about a lighter load, can they be spliced? pat
                      Message 10 of 26 , Aug 6, 2011
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                        Since we are talking about a lighter load, can they be spliced?

                        pat

                        --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, keith gutshall <drpshops@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Hi David
                        > Where do you find the short 25-30 in belts?
                        > Most of the car belts are way to long for the short centers of a machine.
                        >  
                        > Keith
                        >
                        > Deep Run Portage
                        > Back Shop
                        > " The Lizard Works"
                        >
                        > From: David G. LeVine <dlevine@...>
                        > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                        > Sent: Saturday, July 30, 2011 8:50 PM
                        > Subject: Re: [multimachine] Re: Precursors
                        >
                        >
                        >  
                        > On 07/30/2011 03:55 PM, keith gutshall wrote:
                        >  The expenive part was the pulley for the large shaft.
                        > Why bother?  An automotive "serpentine" belt inside out will drive it well enough directly on the pipe.  The pulley for the motor can be turned in place since it is round and only slightly convex.  You will NEED a tensioner and it would help to clean up the pipe before running it too long.
                        >
                        > For a real MM, turning the grooves for the serpentine belt would be a good idea.  The included angle is 40° or 41°, IIRC.  For the motor, an alternator pulley and a bushing should do the trick, or mount the alternator pulley on the jackshaft.
                        >
                        > Serpentine belts have lower losses than V belts and can handle more torque.  The tensioner ideally should be on the side which comes off the drive since the other side is tensioned by drive torque.
                        >
                        > Dave  8{)
                        >
                      • Shannon DeWolfe
                        Kieth, Sorry to hear of your heart problems. I hope the doctors found the reason for the irregular heart beats? Take care of your health. We need your
                        Message 11 of 26 , Aug 7, 2011
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                          Kieth,

                          Sorry to hear of your heart problems. I hope the doctors found "the" reason for the irregular heart beats? Take care of your health. We need your knowledge, experience, and willingness to try something new and different.
                          Regards,
                          
                          Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
                          --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 55 year old fat man.
                          

                          On 8/6/2011 12:02 PM, keith gutshall wrote: My heart was acting up,It got an irregular rethuem
                        • costasv
                          many many wishes to be better. Costas
                          Message 12 of 26 , Aug 7, 2011
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                            many many wishes to be better.
                            Costas

                            --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Shannon DeWolfe <sdewolfe@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Kieth,
                            >
                            > Sorry to hear of your heart problems. I hope the doctors found "the"
                            > reason for the irregular heart beats? Take care of your health. We need
                            > your knowledge, experience, and willingness to try something new and
                            > different.
                            >
                            > Regards,
                            >
                            > Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
                            > --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 55 year old fat man.
                            >
                            >
                            > On 8/6/2011 12:02 PM, keith gutshall wrote:
                            > > My heart was acting up,It got an irregular rethuem
                            >
                          • David G. LeVine
                            ... Try looking in McMaster Carr for 240J6 belts for a starter, $12.95 each. Then look at Madison Tractor
                            Message 13 of 26 , Aug 7, 2011
                            • 0 Attachment
                              On 08/06/2011 12:44 PM, keith gutshall wrote:
                              Hi David
                              Where do you find the short 25-30 in belts?
                              Most of the car belts are way to long for the short centers of a machine.
                               
                              Keith
                               
                              Deep Run Portage
                              Back Shop
                              " The Lizard Works"

                              Try looking in McMaster Carr for 240J6 belts for a starter, $12.95 each.  Then look at Madison Tractor, which has the same belt for $3.12 each.  A Google search gives 26,800 hits for 240J6.

                              The trick is to find out what belts are common locally, then use that design.  For example, the 2001 Buick Skylark with a 2.5 liter engine uses a 240K4 (4 rib, 24.0" long) belt available here which costs under $4.00

                              Does that help?

                              Dave  8{)

                              --
                              "Political Correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical minority and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end." (quoted from http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=30060)
                            • Pat
                              Great job Dave, thanks also for your kind words about the MM spindle. Pat
                              Message 14 of 26 , Aug 7, 2011
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                                Great job Dave, thanks also for your kind words about the MM spindle.

                                Pat

                                --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "David G. LeVine" <dlevine@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > On 08/06/2011 12:44 PM, keith gutshall wrote:
                                > >
                                > > Hi David
                                > > Where do you find the short 25-30 in belts?
                                > > Most of the car belts are way to long for the short centers of a machine.
                                > > Keith
                                > > Deep Run Portage
                                > > Back Shop
                                > > " The Lizard Works"
                                >
                                > Try looking in McMaster Carr
                                > <http://www.mcmaster.com/#ribbed-v-belts/=dilfp3> for 240J6 belts for a
                                > starter, $12.95 each. Then look at Madison Tractor
                                > <http://www.madisontractor.com/240j6-micro-rib-v-belt-22591.html>, which
                                > has the same belt for $3.12 each. A Google search
                                > <http://www.google.com/search?aq=f&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=240J6>
                                > gives 26,800 hits for 240J6.
                                >
                                > The trick is to find out what belts are common locally, then use that
                                > design. For example, the 2001 Buick Skylark with a 2.5 liter engine
                                > uses a 240K4 (4 rib, 24.0" long) belt available here
                                > <http://www.vbeltsupply.com/ecommerce/240K4.html> which costs under $4.00
                                >
                                > Does that help?
                                >
                                > Dave 8{)
                                >
                                > --
                                > /"Political Correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional,
                                > illogical minority and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream
                                > media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to
                                > pick up a turd by the clean end."/ (quoted from
                                > http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=30060)
                                >
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