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Re: [multimachine] Automotive bearing runout

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  • Shannon DeWolfe
    Howdy, This isn t a direct answer but it might be helpful. Here is the type number for a 1991-2003 Ford Escort Front Wheel Bearing: DAC43790041/38 That bearing
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 1, 2011
      Howdy,

      This isn't a direct answer but it might be helpful.

      Here is the type number for a 1991-2003 Ford Escort Front Wheel Bearing:

      DAC43790041/38

      That bearing is a double row angular contact bearing with a rating of
      ABEC-1 which, according to Wikipedia equates to ISO Tolerance Class P6x.
      I found a page that equated P6x runout specs to P0 but it didn't give
      the runout for either classification. This page:

      http://www.wib-bearings.com/en/tech/tech_04.htm

      equates ABEC-1 with ISO Class 0 which is the loosest "precision" bearing.

      According to this page:

      http://www.smbbearings.com/tolerancetables.htm

      a P0 bearing with an inner bore of 30-50mm can have a radial runout of
      no more than .015mm.

      A P5 bearing of that size shows a radial runout of .005mm.

      You can buy that Ford Escort bearing from VXB for US$24:

      http://www.vxb.com/page/bearings/PROD/Kit11020

      I just picked the Escort out of thin air and searched Google for "Ford
      Escort wheel bearing". Once I had the type number, I used that to dig a
      little more to find the specs.

      You should be able to do the same thing for any bearing you can think of.

      Regards,

      Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
      --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 55 year old fat man.


      On 6/30/2011 10:13 PM, zaphod wrote:
      > I'm going to get going on some machines very soon and I'm deciding what kind of bearings to use.
    • Pat
      Good job Shannon This accuracy is certainly enough for spindle bushings etc. Note to new people: Shannon is a world class researcher! I searched for
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 5, 2011
        Good job Shannon
        This accuracy is certainly enough for spindle bushings etc.

        Note to new people: Shannon is a world class researcher! I searched for information about concrete machine tool technology for years and failed, Shannon discovered Yeomans shortly after I put out a plea.

        Shannon, if you ever get really bored, would you research early designs for commercial size nut shellers/grain grinders etc.? Maybe Yeomans technology could be used to make updated agricultural machines for village level food processing.

        This might not be a small idea, literally billions of hours could be saved by a family of such machines that could made from local materials (concrete and junk, naturally).

        Gotta think big around here!

        Pat

        --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Shannon DeWolfe <sdewolfe@...> wrote:
        >
        > Howdy,
        >
        > This isn't a direct answer but it might be helpful.
        >
        > Here is the type number for a 1991-2003 Ford Escort Front Wheel Bearing:
        >
        > DAC43790041/38
        >
        > That bearing is a double row angular contact bearing with a rating of
        > ABEC-1 which, according to Wikipedia equates to ISO Tolerance Class P6x.
        > I found a page that equated P6x runout specs to P0 but it didn't give
        > the runout for either classification. This page:
        >
        > http://www.wib-bearings.com/en/tech/tech_04.htm
        >
        > equates ABEC-1 with ISO Class 0 which is the loosest "precision" bearing.
        >
        > According to this page:
        >
        > http://www.smbbearings.com/tolerancetables.htm
        >
        > a P0 bearing with an inner bore of 30-50mm can have a radial runout of
        > no more than .015mm.
        >
        > A P5 bearing of that size shows a radial runout of .005mm.
        >
        > You can buy that Ford Escort bearing from VXB for US$24:
        >
        > http://www.vxb.com/page/bearings/PROD/Kit11020
        >
        > I just picked the Escort out of thin air and searched Google for "Ford
        > Escort wheel bearing". Once I had the type number, I used that to dig a
        > little more to find the specs.
        >
        > You should be able to do the same thing for any bearing you can think of.
        >
        > Regards,
        >
        > Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
        > --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 55 year old fat man.
        >
        >
        > On 6/30/2011 10:13 PM, zaphod wrote:
        > > I'm going to get going on some machines very soon and I'm deciding what kind of bearings to use.
        >
      • David G. LeVine
        ... If you look back to grain mills, the wheels were huge stone things. While the stone grit in ground grain (flour) is an issue with tooth wear, the making of
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 6, 2011
          On 07/05/2011 03:26 PM, Pat wrote:
          > This might not be a small idea, literally billions of hours could be saved by a family of such machines that could made from local materials (concrete and junk, naturally).

          If you look back to grain mills, the wheels were huge stone things.
          While the stone grit in ground grain (flour) is an issue with tooth
          wear, the making of such stone wheels is horrific. Consider that
          cutting two flat, 6 foot diameter grinders is a huge job, if only from
          the weight of the wheels.

          Could a cast composite (concrete) wheel be a good alternative? Wear and
          grit might be worth examining as negatives, but manufacture time may be
          a major issue, 30 days vs. 300 days for a pair.

          Dave 8{)
        • Pat Delany
          Thanks Dave This is the sort of thing I had in mind. I thought maybe a marble dust mix on the outer surfaces then adding a regular concrete mix to the center
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 6, 2011
            Thanks Dave
            This is the sort of thing I had in mind. I thought maybe a marble dust mix on the outer surfaces then adding a regular concrete mix to the center after a few hours. My main interest would be to see how Yeomans technology could be used.

            Pat



            From: David G. LeVine <dlevine@...>
            To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Wed, July 6, 2011 9:27:40 AM
            Subject: Re: [multimachine] Re: Automotive bearing runout/Shannon/more

             

            On 07/05/2011 03:26 PM, Pat wrote:
            > This might not be a small idea, literally billions of hours could be saved by a family of such machines that could made from local materials (concrete and junk, naturally).

            If you look back to grain mills, the wheels were huge stone things.
            While the stone grit in ground grain (flour) is an issue with tooth
            wear, the making of such stone wheels is horrific. Consider that
            cutting two flat, 6 foot diameter grinders is a huge job, if only from
            the weight of the wheels.

            Could a cast composite (concrete) wheel be a good alternative? Wear and
            grit might be worth examining as negatives, but manufacture time may be
            a major issue, 30 days vs. 300 days for a pair.

            Dave 8{)

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