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Re: Math problem/How to Build progress/Thanks again Tyler/help

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  • Pat
    Would someone build one to test this out? If it works OK then it is possible to measure .001 with a carpenter s square and a plumb bob. I would do it myself
    Message 1 of 47 , Jun 7, 2011
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      Would someone build one to test this out?
      If it works OK then it is possible to measure .001" with a carpenter's square and a plumb bob. I would do it myself but I can't walk far enough to make my way around a big box store to get the 1/8" aluminum rod.
      it's at "02 lathe ways level detector"

      Pat
      --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Pat" <rigmatch@...> wrote:
      >
      > Tyler did a great job on my sketchy idea. His drawings are in "02 lathe ways level detector"
      >
      > I compared my 3 old bubble levels with my new Grizzly machine level and there was a vast difference in sensitivity. The machine level is just too sensitive for every day use. The Chinese instructions says (I think) that after you adjust it, it takes several hours to stabilize!
      >
      > Pat
      > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Simon Benjamins <simon_benjamins@> wrote:
      > >
      > > 2011/6/7 Wes Jones <wes@>
      > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Actually not quite 1" sideways but close enough for rough leveling.
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      > > It would be exactly 1" sideways in the example I gave earlier.
      > >
      > > Simon
      > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > --
      > > > Enlighten the people, generally, and tyranny and oppressions of body and
      > > > mind will vanish like spirits at the dawn of day.
      > > >
      > > > Thomas Jefferson
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > ------------------------------------
      > > >
      > > > -------------
      > > > We have a sister site for files and pictures dedicated to concrete machine
      > > > framed machine tools. You will find a great deal of information about
      > > > concrete based machines and the inventor of the concrete frame lathe, Lucian
      > > > Ingraham Yeomans. Go to
      > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Multimachine-Concrete-Machine-Tools/
      > > >
      > > > Also visit the Joseph V. Romig group for even more concrete tool
      > > > construction, shop notes, stories, and wisdom from the early 20th Century.
      > > > http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/romig_designs/
      > > > -------------Yahoo! Groups Links
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • davi firdaus.drs
      Message 47 of 47 , Aug 21, 2011
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        --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "davi firdaus.drs" <hydrofilt.firdaus@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "David G. LeVine" <dlevine@> wrote:
        > >
        > > On 06/08/2011 03:17 PM, o1bigtenor wrote:
        > > > Very different - - for sure!! You will still have a difficult time
        > > > convincing me that a cobbled together tool made from a chunk of wood
        > > > (most likely a softwood) clamped to a cheap steel or aluminum
        > > > carpenter's square is going to give excellent repeatability. (Humidity
        > > > changes alone will challenge that never mind temperature!)
        > >
        > > Since it is self calibrating, it is surprisingly good. Humidity WILL
        > > matter, but is pretty constant over an hour. Temperature will matter,
        > > but it is pretty constant at night.
        > >
        > > If the cheap square does not use wood, it will not be affected by
        > > humidity, yes the cordage on the plumb bob will stretch and shrink, but
        > > not all that fast and it will have a minimal effect on accuracy.
        > >
        > > Remember, we are not looking for perfect, just barely good enough.
        > >
        > > Dave 8{)
        > >
        >
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