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Re: Belt drive for temp. lathe

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  • kwolson2002
    Pat - Looks great! How did you keep the starter s gear out at the end of the shaft to engage the flywheel? I m guessing a sleeve of pipe or similar, but just
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 1, 2005
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      Pat -

      Looks great!

      How did you keep the starter's gear out at the end of the shaft to
      engage the flywheel? I'm guessing a sleeve of pipe or similar, but
      just wondered.

      This should give a nice low speed, especially if another jack shaft
      were used; it could help, even after a more standard drive is built,
      for turning large diameter pieces, or when doing coarse pitch
      threading. Something along these lines would be great when building a
      VTL.

      Depending on the mounting configuration of the starter, it might be
      easily swung out of the way when not needed by only leaving one
      mounting bolt and spinning the starter around it, then tightening to
      lock, or inserting another bolt into a dedicated hole for "disengaged".

      Kevin

      --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Pat Delany" <rigmatch@y...>
      wrote:
      >
      > I uploaded to "photos" next to the truck in the main directory, a
      pic.
      > of a gutted starter motor with a timing belt drive. The next one I do
      > is going to have 2 slots for the belt. I am also going coat part of
      > the rotor with JB weld, then turn the JB weld down and groove it for
      a
      > longer lasting poly belt.I'll also drill the bushings for oil holes.
      > I added this because I had trouble explaining the idea (as usual!).
      >
      > What do you think?
      >
      > Pat
      >
    • Pat Delany
      Thanks Kevin Don t laugh, I epoxied it place! A tack weld or a spacer would do fine. This is really for the engine block based temp lathe.A flywheel
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 1, 2005
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        Thanks Kevin
        Don't laugh, I epoxied it place! A tack weld or a spacer would do
        fine. This is really for the engine block based "temp" lathe.A
        flywheel faceplate turning 100 rpm would be fine for most things

        Pat

        .-- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "kwolson2002" <kwayneolson@h...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Pat -
        >
        > Looks great!
        >
        > How did you keep the starter's gear out at the end of the shaft to
        > engage the flywheel? I'm guessing a sleeve of pipe or similar, but
        > just wondered.
        >
        > This should give a nice low speed, especially if another jack shaft
        > were used; it could help, even after a more standard drive is built,
        > for turning large diameter pieces, or when doing coarse pitch
        > threading. Something along these lines would be great when building a
        > VTL.
        >
        > Depending on the mounting configuration of the starter, it might be
        > easily swung out of the way when not needed by only leaving one
        > mounting bolt and spinning the starter around it, then tightening to
        > lock, or inserting another bolt into a dedicated hole for "disengaged".
        >
        > Kevin
        >
        > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Pat Delany" <rigmatch@y...>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > I uploaded to "photos" next to the truck in the main directory, a
        > pic.
        > > of a gutted starter motor with a timing belt drive. The next one I do
        > > is going to have 2 slots for the belt. I am also going coat part of
        > > the rotor with JB weld, then turn the JB weld down and groove it for
        > a
        > > longer lasting poly belt.I'll also drill the bushings for oil holes.
        > > I added this because I had trouble explaining the idea (as usual!).
        > >
        > > What do you think?
        > >
        > > Pat
        > >
        >
      • wombat4622603
        ... Here is an idea for putting the mating teeth around the rotor. Either by adding material (with epoxy putty) or subtracting material by turning the rotor,
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 1, 2005
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          --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Pat Delany" <rigmatch@y...> wrote:
          >
          > I uploaded to "photos" next to the truck in the main directory, a pic.
          > of a gutted starter motor with a timing belt drive. The next one I do
          > is going to have 2 slots for the belt. I am also going coat part of
          > the rotor with JB weld, then turn the JB weld down and groove it for a
          > longer lasting poly belt.I'll also drill the bushings for oil holes.
          > I added this because I had trouble explaining the idea (as usual!).
          >
          > What do you think?
          >
          > Pat
          >
          Here is an idea for putting the mating teeth around the rotor. Either
          by adding material (with epoxy putty) or subtracting material by
          turning the rotor, bring the rotor diameter to one that will support
          an integer number of teeth. Then use an appropriate length of belt
          material around the circumference along with some additional epoxy
          putty to mold the teeth in place. Johnson & Johnson's floor wax makes
          a very good release agent. The epoxy putty should be applied both to
          the rotor and to the inside of the belt before its application.
          Rubber bands could secure the belt in position while the epoxy cured.

          David Wimberley
        • Pat Delany
          David What a great idea! pat
          Message 4 of 10 , Dec 1, 2005
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            David

            What a great idea!

            pat
            --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "wombat4622603" <davidwi@n...> wrote:
            >
            > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Pat Delany" <rigmatch@y...> wrote:
            > >
            > > I uploaded to "photos" next to the truck in the main directory, a pic.
            > > of a gutted starter motor with a timing belt drive. The next one I do
            > > is going to have 2 slots for the belt. I am also going coat part of
            > > the rotor with JB weld, then turn the JB weld down and groove it for a
            > > longer lasting poly belt.I'll also drill the bushings for oil holes.
            > > I added this because I had trouble explaining the idea (as usual!).
            > >
            > > What do you think?
            > >
            > > Pat
            > >
            > Here is an idea for putting the mating teeth around the rotor. Either
            > by adding material (with epoxy putty) or subtracting material by
            > turning the rotor, bring the rotor diameter to one that will support
            > an integer number of teeth. Then use an appropriate length of belt
            > material around the circumference along with some additional epoxy
            > putty to mold the teeth in place. Johnson & Johnson's floor wax makes
            > a very good release agent. The epoxy putty should be applied both to
            > the rotor and to the inside of the belt before its application.
            > Rubber bands could secure the belt in position while the epoxy cured.
            >
            > David Wimberley
            >
          • Bobby Yates Emory
            Pat, Building on David s idea. Get another belt of the same pitch. Turn it wrong side out around the rotor, cut to length, and glue it into place. This is a
            Message 5 of 10 , Dec 1, 2005
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              Pat,

              Building on David's idea. Get another belt of the same pitch. Turn
              it wrong side out around the rotor, cut to length, and glue it into
              place.

              This is a temporary lathe - right. Those "teeth" might last long
              enough to get the job done.

              The problem with both David's idea and my variation, is going to be
              the integral number of teeth problem. If you like the concept, I have
              an idea about how to solve that problem.

              Bobby

              On 12/1/05, wombat4622603 <davidwi@...> wrote:
              > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Pat Delany" <rigmatch@y...> wrote:
              > >
              > > I uploaded to "photos" next to the truck in the main directory, a pic.
              > > of a gutted starter motor with a timing belt drive. The next one I do
              > > is going to have 2 slots for the belt. I am also going coat part of
              > > the rotor with JB weld, then turn the JB weld down and groove it for a
              > > longer lasting poly belt.I'll also drill the bushings for oil holes.
              > > I added this because I had trouble explaining the idea (as usual!).
              > >
              > > What do you think?
              > >
              > > Pat
              > >
              > Here is an idea for putting the mating teeth around the rotor. Either
              > by adding material (with epoxy putty) or subtracting material by
              > turning the rotor, bring the rotor diameter to one that will support
              > an integer number of teeth. Then use an appropriate length of belt
              > material around the circumference along with some additional epoxy
              > putty to mold the teeth in place. Johnson & Johnson's floor wax makes
              > a very good release agent. The epoxy putty should be applied both to
              > the rotor and to the inside of the belt before its application.
              > Rubber bands could secure the belt in position while the epoxy cured.
              >
              > David Wimberley
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >


              --
              Toward freedom,

              Bobby Yates Emory
            • wombat4622603
              I have found countless uses for body putty and epoxy over the years. A lot of my inspriation came from patternmaking books. David Wimberley ... a pic. ... I do
              Message 6 of 10 , Dec 2, 2005
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                I have found countless uses for body putty and epoxy over the years.
                A lot of my inspriation came from patternmaking books.

                David Wimberley
                >
                > David
                >
                > What a great idea!
                >
                > pat
                > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "wombat4622603" <davidwi@n...>
                wrote:
                > >
                > > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Pat Delany" <rigmatch@y...>
                wrote:
                > > >
                > > > I uploaded to "photos" next to the truck in the main directory,
                a pic.
                > > > of a gutted starter motor with a timing belt drive. The next one
                I do
                > > > is going to have 2 slots for the belt. I am also going coat part of
                > > > the rotor with JB weld, then turn the JB weld down and groove it
                for a
                > > > longer lasting poly belt.I'll also drill the bushings for oil
                holes.
                > > > I added this because I had trouble explaining the idea (as usual!).
                > > >
                > > > What do you think?
                > > >
                > > > Pat
                > > >
                > > Here is an idea for putting the mating teeth around the rotor. Either
                > > by adding material (with epoxy putty) or subtracting material by
                > > turning the rotor, bring the rotor diameter to one that will support
                > > an integer number of teeth. Then use an appropriate length of belt
                > > material around the circumference along with some additional epoxy
                > > putty to mold the teeth in place. Johnson & Johnson's floor wax makes
                > > a very good release agent. The epoxy putty should be applied both to
                > > the rotor and to the inside of the belt before its application.
                > > Rubber bands could secure the belt in position while the epoxy cured.
                > >
                > > David Wimberley
                > >
                >
              • Jeff
                Lets stick with a polyvee flat belt. The lathe doesn t need positive drive and the polyvee is very easy to work with. any modern car has a few under the hood.
                Message 7 of 10 , Dec 2, 2005
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                  Lets stick with a polyvee flat belt. The lathe doesn't need positive
                  drive and the polyvee is very easy to work with. any modern car has a
                  few under the hood.
                  Jeff

                  --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "wombat4622603" <davidwi@n...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I have found countless uses for body putty and epoxy over the years.
                  > A lot of my inspriation came from patternmaking books.
                  >
                  > David Wimberley
                  > >
                  > > David
                  > >
                  > > What a great idea!
                  > >
                  > > pat
                  > > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "wombat4622603" <davidwi@n...>
                  > wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Pat Delany" <rigmatch@y...>
                  > wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > I uploaded to "photos" next to the truck in the main directory,
                  > a pic.
                  > > > > of a gutted starter motor with a timing belt drive. The next one
                  > I do
                  > > > > is going to have 2 slots for the belt. I am also going coat
                  part of
                  > > > > the rotor with JB weld, then turn the JB weld down and groove it
                  > for a
                  > > > > longer lasting poly belt.I'll also drill the bushings for oil
                  > holes.
                  > > > > I added this because I had trouble explaining the idea (as
                  usual!).
                  > > > >
                  > > > > What do you think?
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Pat
                  > > > >
                  > > > Here is an idea for putting the mating teeth around the rotor.
                  Either
                  > > > by adding material (with epoxy putty) or subtracting material by
                  > > > turning the rotor, bring the rotor diameter to one that will support
                  > > > an integer number of teeth. Then use an appropriate length of belt
                  > > > material around the circumference along with some additional epoxy
                  > > > putty to mold the teeth in place. Johnson & Johnson's floor wax
                  makes
                  > > > a very good release agent. The epoxy putty should be applied
                  both to
                  > > > the rotor and to the inside of the belt before its application.
                  > > > Rubber bands could secure the belt in position while the epoxy
                  cured.
                  > > >
                  > > > David Wimberley
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
                • wombat4622603
                  That does make sense. David ... support ... belt
                  Message 8 of 10 , Dec 4, 2005
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                    That does make sense.

                    David

                    --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff" <jhan5en@y...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Lets stick with a polyvee flat belt. The lathe doesn't need positive
                    > drive and the polyvee is very easy to work with. any modern car has a
                    > few under the hood.
                    > Jeff
                    >
                    > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "wombat4622603" <davidwi@n...>
                    wrote:
                    > >
                    > > I have found countless uses for body putty and epoxy over the years.
                    > > A lot of my inspriation came from patternmaking books.
                    > >
                    > > David Wimberley
                    > > >
                    > > > David
                    > > >
                    > > > What a great idea!
                    > > >
                    > > > pat
                    > > > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "wombat4622603" <davidwi@n...>
                    > > wrote:
                    > > > >
                    > > > > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Pat Delany" <rigmatch@y...>
                    > > wrote:
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > I uploaded to "photos" next to the truck in the main directory,
                    > > a pic.
                    > > > > > of a gutted starter motor with a timing belt drive. The next one
                    > > I do
                    > > > > > is going to have 2 slots for the belt. I am also going coat
                    > part of
                    > > > > > the rotor with JB weld, then turn the JB weld down and groove it
                    > > for a
                    > > > > > longer lasting poly belt.I'll also drill the bushings for oil
                    > > holes.
                    > > > > > I added this because I had trouble explaining the idea (as
                    > usual!).
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > What do you think?
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > Pat
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > Here is an idea for putting the mating teeth around the rotor.
                    > Either
                    > > > > by adding material (with epoxy putty) or subtracting material by
                    > > > > turning the rotor, bring the rotor diameter to one that will
                    support
                    > > > > an integer number of teeth. Then use an appropriate length of
                    belt
                    > > > > material around the circumference along with some additional epoxy
                    > > > > putty to mold the teeth in place. Johnson & Johnson's floor wax
                    > makes
                    > > > > a very good release agent. The epoxy putty should be applied
                    > both to
                    > > > > the rotor and to the inside of the belt before its application.
                    > > > > Rubber bands could secure the belt in position while the epoxy
                    > cured.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > David Wimberley
                    > > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    >
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