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Re: carriage frame welding, ideas needed./Mikeafloat

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  • Pat
    Thanks Michael I put it in the 01 carriage photo folder. Mike can you or anyone else come up with a low profile carriage for use with a powered aux. spindle.
    Message 1 of 23 , Mar 31, 2011
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      Thanks Michael
      I put it in the 01 carriage photo folder.

      Mike
      can you or anyone else come up with a low profile carriage for use with a powered aux. spindle.

      Pat

      --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, michael broadbent <bargemaster24@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi
      >   I have attached crossection drawings of gib adjuster.
      > In section A the angle iron is drilled and tapped to take grub screw fitted wth
      > a lock nut.This pushes the gib towards the pipe.
      > In section B the two bolts pass through clearance holes in the angle iron and
      > tapped into the crs.By adusting the nuts the gib can be pulled away from the
      > pipe .
      > By balancing the push pull effect the gib can be adjusted to suit.
      > I think the gibs would need to be adjusted fairly often until the brass had a
      > wider seating .
      > It might be advisable to bolt on stops to locate the crs .
      >
      > I will leave the filing to Pat as thats still a magic art to me lol
      >
      > Mikeafloat
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: michael broadbent <bargemaster24@...>
      > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Mon, 28 March, 2011 13:21:27
      > Subject: Re: [multimachine] Re: carriage frame welding, ideas needed./Mikeafloat
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Hello Keith
      >            The rows of screws work against each other
      > .the studs in a are used to pull the crs back the row b screws push .by
      > balancing the 3 rows a very fine setting can be obtained.
      >    Can do a cross section drawing this evening it might be better than my
      > description.
      >
      > Mike
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: keith gutshall <drpshops@...>
      > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Sun, 27 March, 2011 23:17:12
      > Subject: Re: [multimachine] Re: carriage frame welding, ideas needed./Mikeafloat
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Hello Mike
      >  I have looked at the drawings and I am not seeing how the adjustment screws are
      > going
      >  to work?
      >  Am I missing something in the drawing,I just do not see what is happening.
      >
      >  Keith
      >
      > Deep Run Portage
      > Back Shop
      > " The Lizard Works"
      >
      > --- On Sun, 3/27/11, michael broadbent <bargemaster24@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > >From: michael broadbent <bargemaster24@...>
      > >Subject: Re: [multimachine] Re: carriage frame welding, ideas
      > needed./Mikeafloat
      > >To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
      > >Date: Sunday, March 27, 2011, 11:34 AM
      > >
      > >
      > > 
      > >Hi
      > >   The pictures went ok now to give a explainasion.
      > >    I can not see any reason for the angle being attached in a v section and
      > >think it will increase the work required to set up the machine.
      > >    In the drawing the angle is shown with the upright to the outside of the
      > >frame but could just as easily be on the inside which would cut down vibraion
      > >but might make the gib harder to adjust.
      > >    The adjustable gib consists of a brass strip fitted to a CRS strip by
      > >counter sunk brass screws tapped in to the Crs
      > >    On the reverse side of the CRS holes a are drilled and blind tapped
      > >    0n the angle iron clearance holes b are drillid and holes c are drilled and
      > >tapped.
      > >     When assembled  set screws fitted with nuts pass through the angle iron
      > >into the crs using holes b.Holes c have screws with lock nuts fitted ,it is
      > >normal to use allen grubscrews for this .It allows more space to work in and
      > >also acts as a guide to which scews do what.
      > >     It may sound a long winded process but when setting up it is no more taxing
      > >than setting up a four jaw chuck.
      > >     On the plus side one learns how to tap holes lol
      > >
      > >Mikeafloat
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > ________________________________
      > From: michael broadbent <bargemaster24@...>
      > >To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
      > >Cc: micheal bent broadbent <BrdbMc@...>
      > >Sent: Sun, 27 March, 2011 16:51:28
      > >Subject: Re: [multimachine] Re: carriage frame welding, ideas needed./Mikeafloat
      > >[2 Attachments]
      > >
      > >[Attachment(s) from michael broadbent included below]
      > >
      > >
      > >Hi
      > >  just testing
      > > 
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > ________________________________
      > From: michael broadbent <bargemaster24@...>
      > >To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
      > >Sent: Thu, 24 March, 2011 13:24:25
      > >Subject: Re: [multimachine] Re: carriage frame welding, ideas
      > needed./Mikeafloat
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >Hi Pat
      > >      Will do my best to check your posts over the next day or two and hope I
      > >can help.
      > >
      > >Mikeafloat
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > ________________________________
      > From: Pat Delany <rigmatch@...>
      > >To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
      > >Sent: Thu, 24 March, 2011 2:28:04
      > >Subject: Re: [multimachine] Re: carriage frame welding, ideas
      > needed./Mikeafloat
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >Mikeafloat, a favor
      > >You have a lot of experience doing millwright work. Would you check my last few
      > >posts about adjusting the carriage  frame etc. and tell me if I am making gross
      > >errors. I have gotten to think that this is the most important part of machine
      > >assembly. Tomorrow I am going to add Dave's idea about brass wear strips, I am
      > >also going to add shim stock under the wear strips for adjustments.
      > >
      > >
      > >Pat
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > ________________________________
      > From: michael broadbent <bargemaster24@...>
      > >To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
      > >Sent: Wed, March 23, 2011 3:22:36 PM
      > >Subject: Re: [multimachine] Re: carriage frame welding, ideas needed.
      > >
      > > 
      > >http://www.zhongyang-engrg.com/catalog/rc2285-2.htm
      > >
      > >Hi
      > >     not sure if this will give you any ideas.
      > >Apart from the type of grinder shown we had what we called a bridge
      > >grinder,basicly a table that carried the work back and forth with a grindstone
      > >able to move through two axis .The stone was mounted 90 degrees to the work
      > >piece.
      > >If the table was ground in place the result should produce flat surfaces .
      > >
      > >Mikeafloat
      > >
      > >----- Original Message ----
      > >From: Pat <rigmatch@...>
      > >To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
      > >Sent: Wed, 23 March, 2011 16:46:04
      > >Subject: [multimachine] Re: carriage frame welding, ideas needed.
      > >
      > >Hi Dennis
      > >Accurate rails for a 4" grinder are an important goal. In the past people have
      > >mentioned window frame extrusions like those used in high rise buildings.
      > >
      > >Re the "close enough" concept. Is it just my imagination or does 90+% of lathe
      > >work take place in just a 5 or 6" cube area?
      > >
      > >Please bear with me on this.... If a 12" or so long carriage is well fitted to
      > >smooth and well aligned ways, won't the averaging? effect of the long carriage
      > >be enough to produce accurate work on a 5 or 6" long workpiece? Am I  nuts?
      > >
      > >Pat
      > >
      > >--- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Dennis" <nojoeco@> wrote:
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> I've been working on my own larger lathe and have run into the same problem.
      > >>There really is no easy way to permanently and strongly attach a previously made
      > >>
      > >>parallel to a non parallel "body". Even bolting or epoxy will induce warping at
      > >
      > >>some level, but it might be "close enough".
      > >>
      > >> My solution is to build yet another machine. I'm having alot of trouble finding
      > >>
      > >>pictures or diagrams of one as it's apparently rare, or not used often enough.
      >
      > >>I'm guessing on it's name even? I'm trying to make my own "travelling" grinder,
      > >
      > >>which will produce flat surfaces on my machine after all of the welding and
      > >>bolting. Then any discrepancies can be either ignored or scraped. Of course the
      > >
      > >>problem I have now is making a set of parallel "rails" for the machine to run on
      > >>
      > >>using only hand tools.
      > >>
      > >> I discovered this other machine when trying to find out how they surface very
      >
      > >>long cylinder heads that won't fit into a regular milling machine.
      > >>
      > >> I have seen the machines that professional lathe bed resurfacers use and that's
      > >>
      > >>a little beyond what I'd need. Also those machines are built very very heavily
      >
      > >>to work quickly. I'm trying to make something that is slow, sure, and cheap. I'm
      > >>
      > >>thinking something using an off the shelf hand grinder, simple railroad type
      > >>base, and taking extremely light cuts relying on gravity for downward grinding
      >
      > >>pressure.
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Pat" <rigmatch@> wrote:
      > >> >
      > >> > In my last post (below) I showed the parallel bar welded to the side of the
      >
      > >>angle iron. How to do this without warping is a critical question. Heat
      > >>distortion will make lining up the parts much more difficult.
      > >> >
      > >> > Pat
      > >> >
      > >> > 
      > >> > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Pat" <rigmatch@> wrote:
      > >> > >
      > >> > > I put 3 revised or new drawings (29,30 31) in the "1 New carriage" photo
      > >>folder. The last one shows the angle iron "shoes" connected by 3 bars. The
      > >>concrete for the carriage base can be poured between the bars. The idea that a
      >
      > >>carriage frame could be used to help align the machine gave me an idea about the
      > >>
      > >>construction sequence of operations.
      > >> > >
      > >> > > (1) The round ways would be inserted and held in place by steel wedges.
      > >> > > (2) The ways would separated by accurate steel bars and would be put in
      > >>plane by the glass plate and ball bearing method.
      > >> > > (3) The carriage frame would be dropped over the ways and very carefully
      > >>aligned. The ways could be adjusted if necessary in order to get perfect contact
      > >>
      > >>between the shoes? and the ways along the full length of the ways.
      > >> > > (4) Non-shrinking grout would be poured into the way sockets. Pourable
      > >>grout has plenty of strength (5000 psi) for this.
      > >> > > (5) Accuracy would be checked again and then a wooden form built around the
      > >>
      > >>carriage frame and the carriage poured.
      > >> > > (6) If accuracy is OK then grout would be poured between the angle iron
      > >>carriage shoes and the concrete.
      > >> > > (7) The engine block or headstock would then be strongly mounted using 
      > >>wedges and bolts into the head bolt holes. It would be aligned using "Rollies
      > >>Dad's method. This would be checked by taking a light facing cut off the
      > >>flywheel. If OK block would be grouted in.
      > >>
      > >> > > (8) A concrete tailstock would be mounted in the same way as the headstock
      > >
      > >>and a Morse taper socket, aligned by the lathe spindle, grouted in place.
      > >> > >
      > >> > > Pat
      > >> > >
      > >> >
      > >>
      > >
      > >------------------------------------
      > >
      > >-------------
      > >We have a sister site for files and pictures dedicated to concrete machine
      > >framed machine tools. You will find a great deal of information about concrete
      > >based machines and the inventor of the concrete frame lathe, Lucian Ingraham
      > >Yeomans. Go to
      > >http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Multimachine-Concrete-Machine-Tools/
      > >
      > >Also visit the Joseph V. Romig group for even more concrete tool construction,
      > >shop notes, stories, and wisdom from the early 20th Century.
      > >http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/romig_designs/
      > >-------------Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >Attachment(s) from michael broadbent
      > >2 of 2 Photo(s)
      > >gib adjuster.jpg" src="http://xa.yimg.com/kq/groups/13335163/tn/1275591910">
      > >gib adjuster.jpg
      > >jpg" src="http://xa.yimg.com/kq/groups/13335163/tn/1520279950">
      > >cross brace.jpg
      > >
      >
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