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The Carriage / Important Question

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  • DennisF MacIntyre
    Dear Pat      Regards you below post;- where you mention rapid wear as long as it could be easily corrected. I have noticed on production machining
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 31, 2011
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      Dear Pat
           Regards you below post;- where you mention "rapid wear as long as it could
      be easily corrected." I have noticed on production machining equipment where a
      pieces of metal of given size is placed between structural parts where wear is
      expected to occure. I, upon observing that, did suppose that all that would be
      required when such wear became excessive, all that would be required would be to
      seperate and replace these worn parts. This would then restore the machine to
      its new specs.

      keep smiling

      dennis mac   

       
      Re: The carriage/ important question
      From: Pat Delany <rigmatch@...> Add to Contacts
      To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com

      ________________________________

       
      Because the contact point between the round way and the side of the angle iron
      is very small I think that it will wear fairly quickly. To me this is a small
      cost  A lathe bed that can be easily made and aligned is worth any problem of
      rapid wear as long as it could be easily corrected.

      Pat
    • keith gutshall
       Hi Dennis  There might be a solution to the problem of wear. Two pieces of the same metal together is not the best idea.  When I was doing some experiments
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 1, 2011
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         Hi Dennis
         There might be a solution to the problem of wear. Two pieces of the same
        metal together is not the best idea.
         When I was doing some experiments with the flat ways ,I had some
        problems with the steel agianst steel.
         
         I wonder if a brass plate on the inside of the angle iron would work
         for a replaceable bearing surface.
         It would only need to be about 1/8inch thick to work. Some small screws
         would hold it on the angle.
         
          The cost would not be that much to the overall cost of the machine.
         
         Keith

        Deep Run Portage
        Back Shop
        " The Lizard Works"

        --- On Mon, 1/31/11, DennisF MacIntyre <a1g2r3i@...> wrote:

        From: DennisF MacIntyre <a1g2r3i@...>
        Subject: [multimachine] The Carriage / Important Question
        To: "Pat Delany" <multimachine@yahoogroups.com>
        Date: Monday, January 31, 2011, 10:46 PM

         
        Dear Pat
             Regards you below post;- where you mention "rapid wear as long as it could
        be easily corrected." I have noticed on production machining equipment where a
        pieces of metal of given size is placed between structural parts where wear is
        expected to occure. I, upon observing that, did suppose that all that would be
        required when such wear became excessive, all that would be required would be to
        seperate and replace these worn parts. This would then restore the machine to
        its new specs.

        keep smiling

        dennis mac   

         
        Re: The carriage/ important question
        From: Pat Delany <rigmatch@...> Add to Contacts
        To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com

        ________________________________

         
        Because the contact point between the round way and the side of the angle iron
        is very small I think that it will wear fairly quickly. To me this is a small
        cost  A lathe bed that can be easily made and aligned is worth any problem of
        rapid wear as long as it could be easily corrected.

        Pat


      • DennisF MacIntyre
        That s the idea Kieth;-     or,  perhaps one could use 1/8 thick precision ground steel but, as you have correctly pointed out, so you do not get steel
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 1, 2011
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          That's the idea Kieth;-     or,  perhaps one could use 1/8 thick precision
          ground steel but, as you have correctly pointed out, so you do not get steel
          moving on steel, put small pads of brass or oil impregnated bronze on the
          underside of the movable carriage. This way the carriage pads would wear first
          and not the more expensive ground 1/8 " thick plate of stationary steel
          material. As the years went by and the carriage pads were replaced a number
          of times, a straight edge could check the precision ground steel wear plate and
          if is finally worn beyond acceptable specs, the replacement of both would bring
          the machine back to its initial condition. 

          dennis mac
        • michael broadbent
          Hi,    Brass will work but normal brass is soft and wears quickly.Gibbs etc used bronze.I have seen plastic used but machining it can be a problem .  
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 1, 2011
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            Hi,
               Brass will work but normal brass is soft and wears quickly.Gibbs etc
            used bronze.I have seen plastic used but machining it can be a problem .
              One idea that we played with was instead of having a Gibb that ran the length of the head we made up 2 short ones.
               Basically 2 wedges were made 2"long,one was fixed to the carriage the other was constructed to move up the incline until no free play was left .
               Will try to do a drawing as even I can not follow my description.lol
             
            Mikeafloat 


            From: keith gutshall <drpshops@...>
            To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tue, 1 February, 2011 14:31:24
            Subject: Re: [multimachine] The Carriage / Important Question



             Hi Dennis
             There might be a solution to the problem of wear. Two pieces of the same
            metal together is not the best idea.
             When I was doing some experiments with the flat ways ,I had some
            problems with the steel agianst steel.
             
             I wonder if a brass plate on the inside of the angle iron would work
             for a replaceable bearing surface.
             It would only need to be about 1/8inch thick to work. Some small screws
             would hold it on the angle.
             
              The cost would not be that much to the overall cost of the machine.
             
             Keith

            Deep Run Portage
            Back Shop
            " The Lizard Works"

            --- On Mon, 1/31/11, DennisF MacIntyre <a1g2r3i@...> wrote:

            From: DennisF MacIntyre <a1g2r3i@...>
            Subject: [multimachine] The Carriage / Important Question
            To: "Pat Delany" <multimachine@yahoogroups.com>
            Date: Monday, January 31, 2011, 10:46 PM

             
            Dear Pat
                 Regards you below post;- where you mention "rapid wear as long as it could
            be easily corrected." I have noticed on production machining equipment where a
            pieces of metal of given size is placed between structural parts where wear is
            expected to occure. I, upon observing that, did suppose that all that would be
            required when such wear became excessive, all that would be required would be to
            seperate and replace these worn parts. This would then restore the machine to
            its new specs.

            keep smiling

            dennis mac   

             
            Re: The carriage/ important question
            From: Pat Delany <rigmatch@...> Add to Contacts
            To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com

            ________________________________

             
            Because the contact point between the round way and the side of the angle iron
            is very small I think that it will wear fairly quickly. To me this is a small
            cost  A lathe bed that can be easily made and aligned is worth any problem of
            rapid wear as long as it could be easily corrected.

            Pat





          • Ian Newman
            Hi,   As the wear on sacrificial strips is unlikely to be symetrical, there would probably be a need to shim the strips to adjust them in such a way as to
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 1, 2011
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              Hi,
               
              As the wear on sacrificial strips is unlikely to be symetrical, there would probably be a need to shim the strips to adjust them in such a way as to keep the saddle correctly aligned with the lathe axis.
               
              Ian.

              --- On Tue, 1/2/11, keith gutshall <drpshops@...> wrote:

              From: keith gutshall <drpshops@...>
              Subject: Re: [multimachine] The Carriage / Important Question
              To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Tuesday, 1 February, 2011, 14:31

               
               Hi Dennis
               There might be a solution to the problem of wear. Two pieces of the same
              metal together is not the best idea.
               When I was doing some experiments with the flat ways ,I had some
              problems with the steel agianst steel.
               
               I wonder if a brass plate on the inside of the angle iron would work
               for a replaceable bearing surface.
               It would only need to be about 1/8inch thick to work. Some small screws
               would hold it on the angle.
               
                The cost would not be that much to the overall cost of the machine.
               
               Keith

              Deep Run Portage
              Back Shop
              " The Lizard Works"

              --- On Mon, 1/31/11, DennisF MacIntyre <a1g2r3i@...> wrote:

              From: DennisF MacIntyre <a1g2r3i@...>
              Subject: [multimachine] The Carriage / Important Question
              To: "Pat Delany" <multimachine@yahoogroups.com>
              Date: Monday, January 31, 2011, 10:46 PM

               
              Dear Pat
                   Regards you below post;- where you mention "rapid wear as long as it could
              be easily corrected." I have noticed on production machining equipment where a
              pieces of metal of given size is placed between structural parts where wear is
              expected to occure. I, upon observing that, did suppose that all that would be
              required when such wear became excessive, all that would be required would be to
              seperate and replace these worn parts. This would then restore the machine to
              its new specs.

              keep smiling

              dennis mac   

               
              Re: The carriage/ important question
              From: Pat Delany <rigmatch@...> Add to Contacts
              To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com

              ________________________________

               
              Because the contact point between the round way and the side of the angle iron
              is very small I think that it will wear fairly quickly. To me this is a small
              cost  A lathe bed that can be easily made and aligned is worth any problem of
              rapid wear as long as it could be easily corrected.

              Pat



            • oldstudentmsgt
              Dennis, do you mean something like a gib on a lathe carriage, or something else? If something else, could you point us to an example? Thanks! Bill in OKC
              Message 6 of 6 , Feb 1, 2011
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                Dennis, do you mean something like a gib on a lathe carriage, or something else? If something else, could you point us to an example?

                Thanks!

                Bill in OKC

                --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, DennisF MacIntyre <a1g2r3i@...> wrote:
                >
                > Dear Pat
                >      Regards you below post;- where you mention "rapid wear as long as it could
                > be easily corrected." I have noticed on production machining equipment where a
                > pieces of metal of given size is placed between structural parts where wear is
                > expected to occure. I, upon observing that, did suppose that all that would be
                > required when such wear became excessive, all that would be required would be to
                > seperate and replace these worn parts. This would then restore the machine to
                > its new specs.
                >
                > keep smiling
                >
                > dennis mac   
                >
                >  
                > Re: The carriage/ important question
                > From: Pat Delany <rigmatch@...> Add to Contacts
                > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                >
                > ________________________________
                >
                >  
                > Because the contact point between the round way and the side of the angle iron
                > is very small I think that it will wear fairly quickly. To me this is a small
                > cost  A lathe bed that can be easily made and aligned is worth any problem of
                > rapid wear as long as it could be easily corrected.
                >
                > Pat
                >
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