Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: A totally new machine

Expand Messages
  • oldstudentmsgt
    http://chestofbooks.com/home-improvement/woodworking/Turning-Cutting-Spinning/Chapter-I-Description-Of-The-Lathe.html describes a simple foot lathe that can
    Message 1 of 79 , Jan 7, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      http://chestofbooks.com/home-improvement/woodworking/Turning-Cutting-Spinning/Chapter-I-Description-Of-The-Lathe.html

      describes a simple "foot lathe" that can be built of wood. With pictures. Such a lathe can turn round ways for a larger lathe or multimachine. Where it startes to get complicated is in trying to get smooth, flat, accurate surfaces. The original thread-cutting lathe needed a long threaded bar for the leadscrew, and those were cut twice. (and the original was cut by hand!!!) Take the hand-cut lead screw and install it. Cut a new lead screw. Flip it end-for-end, and recut it. This halves the error. And that should work just as well cutting ways for a new lathe/multimachine. Use those to cut a NEW set, which should be more acurate, and repeat until you're happy with what you have!

      At least we can start with reasonably precise measureing tools.

      HTH!

      Bill in OKC

      --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Pat" <rigmatch@...> wrote:
      >
      > What I have in mind is that the first machine will only need the ways turned and the flywheel surfaced.
      >
      > Pat
      > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, keith gutshall <drpshops@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hello Pat
      > >  I am all for makeing machines, The machine I built  it has proved very useful
      > > to make parts for me.
      > >  In a remote outpost in Africa  it would be the thing to have.
      > >  I know how many repair and new parts can be made with it.
      > >  
      > > What I am saying ,is the design needs to be flexable to take in account
      > >  the variables in  materials found localily in its construction?
      > >  Can it be made with a minimum amount of machineing?
      > >  Getting the first machine made is the hardest to do,the next machine
      > > can be quickly useing the first one.
      > >  
      > >  Keith
      > > Deep Run Portage
      > > Back Shop
      > > " The Lizard Works"
      > >
      > > --- On Thu, 1/6/11, Pat Delany <rigmatch@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > From: Pat Delany <rigmatch@>
      > > Subject: Re: [multimachine] A totally new machine
      > > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
      > > Date: Thursday, January 6, 2011, 9:52 AM
      > >
      > >
      > >  
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > I don't think that you can assume anything. The Developing World is a very big place.
      > >
      > >
      > > In Ghana I bought a perfectly usable (for us) short block for $10. It had a hole in the side but the crank turned and the inserts could have been shimmed with paper. 
      > > Round ways could be made from old pipe filled with grout and then turned down. 
      > > Iron for the cross slide can be almost any size at first
      > > Training can be made easier by teaching people to turn roughly to size and finish and then finishing the job with a bench or die grinder mounted on the tool post.
      > > Cutting tools can be made from broken drill bits.
      > > A coolant system can be made from a can and an old water pump.
      > > Cutting fluid can be made from used oil and detergent.
      > >
      > >
      > > If the first set of ways can be made straight and installed accurately, everything else is simple and easy to replicate.
      > >
      > >
      > > Pat
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > From: keith gutshall <drpshops@>
      > > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Thu, January 6, 2011 8:28:28 AM
      > > Subject: Re: [multimachine] A totally new machine
      > >
      > >  
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Hi HB
      > > You are probably correct about that statement, in third world areas
      > > metal is a prized commodity
      > >  A blown up or older car would be a wealth of parts.
      > >  The steel parts could be recycled in to a lot of useful items.
      > >  
      > >  Keith
      > >
      > > Deep Run Portage
      > > Back Shop
      > > " The Lizard Works"
      > >
      > > --- On Wed, 1/5/11, HB <scfpigs@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > From: HB <scfpigs@>
      > > Subject: Re: [multimachine] A totally new machine
      > > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
      > > Date: Wednesday, January 5, 2011, 8:30 PM
      > >
      > >
      > >  
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Most often, those items you mentioned as scraps, are not really considered "scraps" in poorer countries if they still have some semblance of useable and saleable shapes. In their economic standing and reality, those parts are not exactly cheap or just given away unlike in the U.S.A. or some other first rate countries.
      > >
      > >
      > > --- On Wed, 1/5/11, Pat Delany <rigmatch@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > From: Pat Delany <rigmatch@>
      > > Subject: Re: [multimachine] A totally new machine
      > > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
      > > Date: Wednesday, January 5, 2011, 7:27 AM
      > >
      > >
      > >  
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > This is the exact reason for the new machine. A junk engine will furnish the spindle, bushings, chuck, chuck mount, head bolts (for mounting). All else you need to buy is concrete mix, scrap hydraulic piston rods,  3' of steel bar, 2' of angle iron and a hand full of bolts.
      > >
      > >
      > > A real no brainer
      > >
      > >
      > > Pat
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > From: keith gutshall <drpshops@>
      > > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Wed, January 5, 2011 8:50:26 AM
      > > Subject: Re: [multimachine] A totally new machine
      > >
      > >  
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Hi Gordon
      > > The price of building machines can variable a lot.It depends on how many
      > >  parts you can find.
      > >  Can a part be modifed to work with a small cost?
      > >  Sometimes the cost of hardware(nuts&bolts) will surprise you as to their
      > >  cost,.
      > >  The biggest cost for me ,was a motor, the chuck and the mil/drill table.
      > >  These item were about $450 for them.
      > >  
      > >  Keith
      > >
      > > Deep Run Portage
      > > Back Shop
      > > " The Lizard Works"
      > >
      > > --- On Tue, 1/4/11, Gordon Haag <mr.meker@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > From: Gordon Haag <mr.meker@>
      > > Subject: Re: [multimachine] A totally new machine
      > > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
      > > Date: Tuesday, January 4, 2011, 8:13 PM
      > >
      > >
      > >  
      > >
      > > Do you have any idea of how many multimachines are being used in the developing world right now? I really like how it can be put together from almost nothing. 
      > >
      > >
      > > On Tue, Jan 4, 2011 at 11:52 AM, Pat Delany <rigmatch@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > >  
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Hi Keith
      > > The foot of the machine can function as a center rest for longer pieces of pipe or shaft. This is the best way I think of to turn/grind round ways that are long enough to use in building new lathes.
      > >
      > >
      > > The use of a crankshaft as a spindle should work fine. Solid spindles have been obsolete for a hundred years this one is easy to improve on. To start, it would be easy to drill the end at least 6" deep. Additionally, it would not be hard to make a hollow spindle from a piece of pipe once the machine is running.
      > >
      > >
      > > Maybe I am wrong but I think that this new machine is world changing technology because it is so very cheap and easy to accurately build in any commercial size. 
      > >
      > >
      > > If it was built so that the carriage would fit under the chuck then an aux.powered spindle could be used to mill/drill on all sides and ends of a workpiece by reversing the workpiece in the chuck just one time. This is both an accurate way of making a complex workpiece and does not use additional vises and chucks.
      > >
      > >
      > > Pat
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > From: keith gutshall <drpshops@>
      > > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Tue, January 4, 2011 9:52:15 AM
      > > Subject: Re: [multimachine] A totally new machine
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >  
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Hello Pat
      > > The design will be fine if there is a prototype that works.
      > >  Has anybody got a full block crankshaft spindle to work?
      > >  I think Fernman?? was working on a Citrion(SIC?) was exparimenting
      > >  with it ,and I never heard whether he got it to work,or not?
      > >  
      > >  Do you need the full block? Could it be cut in half,one for the headstock
      > > and the other fo the tailstock?
      > >  
      > >  What is with the large piece on the end of the bed,what does it do?
      > >  
      > >  The bed needs to be thicker I think,but it just may be the drawing.
      > >  
      > >  Keith
      > >
      > >
      > > Deep Run Portage
      > > Back Shop
      > > " The Lizard Works"
      > >
      > > --- On Mon, 1/3/11, Pat <rigmatch@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > From: Pat <rigmatch@>
      > > Subject: [multimachine] A totally new machine
      > > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
      > > Date: Monday, January 3, 2011, 2:35 PM
      > >
      > >
      > >  
      > >
      > > In the file folder "lathe construction" are 3 new pictures. it is a design for an engine block and Yeomans bed lathe.
      > > It is a large machine that is meant for the developing world.
      > > Goals:
      > > Buildable from concrete, scrap steel and an engine block
      > > Accurate
      > > Ability to reproduce all of the steel parts needed to make more of them
      > > An under $200 cost
      > >
      > > Dimensions
      > > 12" flywheel/chuck
      > > frame 16" x 4" x 84"
      > > 16+" swing so it can face off 3/4" x 8" x 14" cross slide parts
      > >
      > > Just the beginning
      > >
      > > Pat
      > >
      >
    • Shannon DeWolfe
      Yes it does. I happen to have two identical Mazda 1.6L blocks. I do not have the crankshafts but the bearing caps are all there. I will read the Gingery method
      Message 79 of 79 , Jan 13, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        Yes it does. I happen to have two identical Mazda 1.6L blocks. I do not
        have the crankshafts but the bearing caps are all there. I will read the
        Gingery method and get back to you on this.

        Regards,

        Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
        --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 54 year old fat man.


        On 1/12/2011 10:49 PM, David G. LeVine wrote:
        > Does this help?
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.