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Re: [multimachine] MM table lowering

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  • Carl McIver
    Good place to start, and gave me this idea. If you welded a couple spiders together so it was locked, the removed the center spider shaft to make it hollow,
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 9, 2005
      Good place to start, and gave me this idea. If you welded a couple spiders together so it was locked, the removed the center
      spider shaft to make it hollow, you could attach a nut, whatever kind and mounting you prefer to the pumpkin and let a threaded
      shaft like allthread run up and down inside, with an end of the rod fixed to the other component.

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "bdmail" <bdmail@...>
      To: <multimachine@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, November 09, 2005 8:42 PM
      Subject: Re: [multimachine] MM table lowering


      | How about differential gears. They can handle any amount of force a hand
      | can crank. Also, pleny of them around.
      |
      |
      | Bernie
      |
      |
      |
      |
      |
      | > I sure am slow about some things. Last week I was playing with my
      | > son's knee mill and suddenly realized that a right angle gear box and
      | > a big acme screw and nut would work to raise and lower the table if
      | > you could just do with a smaller range of table travel(lack of room
      | > unless you drilled a hole in the floor). But where to get the gear
      | > box? Then I remembered my old electrician days when we would go
      | > through a gear motor every day or so. Most configurations would be
      | > hard to work with but some would have worked fine. Must also be some
      | > surplus ones somewhere.
      | >
      | > Pat
      | >
      | >
      |
      |
      |
      |
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    • Jeff
      I would still like to see someone use the guts from a garbage compactor. Jeff ... couple spiders together so it was locked, the removed the center ... kind and
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 10, 2005
        I would still like to see someone use the guts from
        a garbage compactor.
        Jeff

        --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Carl McIver" <cmciver@m...> wrote:
        >
        > Good place to start, and gave me this idea. If you welded a
        couple spiders together so it was locked, the removed the center
        > spider shaft to make it hollow, you could attach a nut, whatever
        kind and mounting you prefer to the pumpkin and let a threaded
        > shaft like allthread run up and down inside, with an end of the rod
        fixed to the other component.
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: "bdmail" <bdmail@o...>
        > To: <multimachine@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Wednesday, November 09, 2005 8:42 PM
        > Subject: Re: [multimachine] MM table lowering
        >
        >
        > | How about differential gears. They can handle any amount of force
        a hand
        > | can crank. Also, pleny of them around.
        > |
        > |
        > | Bernie
        > |
        > |
        > |
        > |
        > |
        > | > I sure am slow about some things. Last week I was playing with my
        > | > son's knee mill and suddenly realized that a right angle gear
        box and
        > | > a big acme screw and nut would work to raise and lower the table if
        > | > you could just do with a smaller range of table travel(lack of room
        > | > unless you drilled a hole in the floor). But where to get the gear
        > | > box? Then I remembered my old electrician days when we would go
        > | > through a gear motor every day or so. Most configurations would be
        > | > hard to work with but some would have worked fine. Must also be some
        > | > surplus ones somewhere.
        > | >
        > | > Pat
        > | >
        > | >
        > |
        > |
        > |
        > |
        > | SPONSORED LINKS Craft hobby Hobby and craft supply Craft ideas
        > | Mothers day crafts Machine tool
        > |
        > |
        > |
        --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        > | YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
        > |
        > | a.. Visit your group "multimachine" on the web.
        > |
        > | b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > | multimachine-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > |
        > | c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
        Service.
        > |
        > |
        > |
        --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        > |
        > |
        > |
        >
      • kwolson2002
        Pat - You could get away with a short range of motion on the screw jack, so long as there was a knee lock and a movable support for the jack which had
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 10, 2005
          Pat -

          You could get away with a short range of motion on the screw jack, so
          long as there was a knee lock and a movable support for the jack which
          had adjustment pitch intervals slightly shorter than the range of
          motion of the screw. It wouldn't have to be fancy, how about a setup
          like most hydraulic presses have with a lynch pin through holes?

          The sequence of operation goes something like this:
          - set jack on moveable support (properly adjusted) and apply jack to
          bear weight of table
          - release the table lock
          - raise or lower the table with the screw jack
          - lock table
          - back off jack
          - reset jack support
          - repeat sequence as needed

          Tedious, perhaps, but certainly workable.

          I just disembowled my snowblower which has a worm box between the
          first and second stages, steel worm and bronze or brass wheel. I
          didn't count the teeth so I'm unsure of the exact ratio, but it is not
          self overhauling, despite having a two-thread worm. I'm not suggesting
          that many third world locations, a lot of which are located in
          tropical or subtropical places, would have scrapped snoblowewrs
          lounging around, but it's a possible source for a usable right-angle
          gearbox to drive a screw.

          Kevin

          --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Pat Delany" <rigmatch@y...>
          wrote:
          >
          > I sure am slow about some things. Last week I was playing with my
          > son's knee mill and suddenly realized that a right angle gear box and
          > a big acme screw and nut would work to raise and lower the table if
          > you could just do with a smaller range of table travel(lack of room
          > unless you drilled a hole in the floor). But where to get the gear
          > box? Then I remembered my old electrician days when we would go
          > through a gear motor every day or so. Most configurations would be
          > hard to work with but some would have worked fine. Must also be some
          > surplus ones somewhere.
          >
          > Pat
          >
        • Pat Delany
          The problem that I have run into is in going from the raising to the lowering mode. While accurately raising the table works beautifully, the table wants to
          Message 4 of 7 , Nov 10, 2005
            The problem that I have run into is in going from the raising to the
            lowering mode. While accurately raising the table works beautifully,
            the table wants to "stick" when it starts down. Part of the problem is
            that the table weight is not balanced. If the slide block was turned
            around, a lifting screw passed through the main bearing galley and the
            plate bolted to the "bottom" of the block, it would balance better.
            the problem here is bolting 1/2" x 12" plate to a surface meant for an
            oil pan.

            Pat
            --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "kwolson2002" <kwayneolson@h...>
            wrote:
            >
            > Pat -
            >
            > You could get away with a short range of motion on the screw jack, so
            > long as there was a knee lock and a movable support for the jack which
            > had adjustment pitch intervals slightly shorter than the range of
            > motion of the screw. It wouldn't have to be fancy, how about a setup
            > like most hydraulic presses have with a lynch pin through holes?
            >
            > The sequence of operation goes something like this:
            > - set jack on moveable support (properly adjusted) and apply jack to
            > bear weight of table
            > - release the table lock
            > - raise or lower the table with the screw jack
            > - lock table
            > - back off jack
            > - reset jack support
            > - repeat sequence as needed
            >
            > Tedious, perhaps, but certainly workable.
            >
            > I just disembowled my snowblower which has a worm box between the
            > first and second stages, steel worm and bronze or brass wheel. I
            > didn't count the teeth so I'm unsure of the exact ratio, but it is not
            > self overhauling, despite having a two-thread worm. I'm not suggesting
            > that many third world locations, a lot of which are located in
            > tropical or subtropical places, would have scrapped snoblowewrs
            > lounging around, but it's a possible source for a usable right-angle
            > gearbox to drive a screw.
            >
            > Kevin
            >
            > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Pat Delany" <rigmatch@y...>
            > wrote:
            > >
            > > I sure am slow about some things. Last week I was playing with my
            > > son's knee mill and suddenly realized that a right angle gear box and
            > > a big acme screw and nut would work to raise and lower the table if
            > > you could just do with a smaller range of table travel(lack of room
            > > unless you drilled a hole in the floor). But where to get the gear
            > > box? Then I remembered my old electrician days when we would go
            > > through a gear motor every day or so. Most configurations would be
            > > hard to work with but some would have worked fine. Must also be some
            > > surplus ones somewhere.
            > >
            > > Pat
            > >
            >
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