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Re: [multimachine] Re: detailed drawing of spindle construction

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  • Shannon DeWolfe
    Thomas and Bill, I tried for weeks to find a local source for Petrobond. I contacted three commercial suppliers. I got the contact information for one of them
    Message 1 of 49 , Nov 1, 2010
      Thomas and Bill,

      I tried for weeks to find a local source for Petrobond. I contacted three commercial suppliers. I got the contact information for one of them from a Houston foundry. I spoke with the shop manager. He was very courteous and helpful. But his supplier would not return my calls. I also contacted a brass and zinc foundry in Jacksonville. They do not use sand casting and could not help me. None of the commercial suppliers of oil sand returned my phone calls or emails. That is OK. I understand that they sell tons of product and a hobbyist who wants one bag takes time away from sales that puts money in their pockets. The idea of shipping Petrobond sand from the west coast of the US (budget casting supply) to Texas seems silly to me. Most of the expense would be in transport. So, I decided to make green sand.

      I found a ceramic supply store that sells clays and silica. I bought a small quantity of bentonite, kaolin, fireclay, and silica from them. I will make test batches of various recipes see how they hold together. I'll let you guys know the end result of that.

      Concerning the use of household products as a parting dust:

      Virtually every hobby foundry uses some substitute for commercial parting dust. I know that thousands of people have used talcum, corn starch, wood flour, etc. and have their castings at work today. If you want to use talc or corn starch, it is your foundry, use what you want.

      I have not settled upon a material yet. Diatomaceous earth might be an alternative. It has the desired properties, is readily available in the US, and is not so expensive that I cannot use it. Graphite is about the same price and would make a better facing dust. But, I know from using graphite as a dry lubricant that it is very messy. Gypsum is a possibility but it is also messy to use, clinging to everything.

      I am still researching. I do not have experience with any parting dust, hence the research on the subject. My main goal is to find materials that should be available almost anywhere.
      Regards,
      
      Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
      --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 54 year old fat man.
      

      On 10/31/2010 10:53 AM, Thomas S. Knutsen wrote: Bill, I think Shannon got hold of some Petrobond type sand
    • keith gutshall
      Hello Gordon  On the same idea ,set of 1-2-3 blocks are handy for setting up work on a machine.  Enco sells them for $10 a pair sometimes.   Keith Deep Run
      Message 49 of 49 , Nov 4, 2010
        Hello Gordon
         On the same idea ,set of 1-2-3 blocks are handy for setting up work
        on a machine.
         Enco sells them for $10 a pair sometimes.
         
        Keith

        Deep Run Portage
        Back Shop
        " The Lizard Works"

        --- On Thu, 11/4/10, Gordon Haag <nodrog19@...> wrote:

        From: Gordon Haag <nodrog19@...>
        Subject: Re: [multimachine] Angle plates as spindle supports WAS: EG - was detailed drawing of spindle construction
        To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Thursday, November 4, 2010, 12:01 AM

         
        Angle plates provide a easy way to have a hole exactly perpendicular to a surface using common equipment. What ever you use those holes for is fine, I just thought it was a good idea. It really surprised me how cheap they were.

        In my glass lathe I am using round ways, and I would have used cheap angle plates to hold them if I had had this idea before I did something else. 

        On Wed, Nov 3, 2010 at 8:50 PM, keith gutshall <drpshops@...> wrote:
         
        Hello Gordon
        I think Imust have missed something in this concept?
        I dont understand how to use th angle plate for a machine way?
         
        Keith

        Deep Run Portage
        Back Shop
        " The Lizard Works"

        --- On Wed, 11/3/10, Gordon Haag <nodrog19@...> wrote:

        From: Gordon Haag <nodrog19@...>
        Subject: Re: [multimachine] Angle plates as spindle supports WAS: EG - was detailed drawing of spindle construction
        To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, November 3, 2010, 8:47 PM


         
        I didnt mean to mount the spindle in them, just the ways. You can do better than $40/ft, even if you pay your seld 50/hr for looking in the junkyard.

        On Wed, Nov 3, 2010 at 7:18 AM, David G. LeVine <dlevine@...> wrote:
         
        On 11/03/2010 12:21 AM, Gordon Haag wrote:
        I don't want to start a new thread to share this simple idea. If anyone thinks it worth it, please start your own.

        Would it be practical to use angle plates as part of the MM? Enco has 4.5x3.5x3 angle plates for around $7 ( http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PARTPG=INLMKD&PMPXNO=28764583&PMAKA=TJ418-4520). They are accurate to .002 in 6". 
        I think these would be very useful because if you had a drill press that you had squared the table on with a cheap dial indicator, you could drill a hole in the angle plate, rotate it, and now have a hole that is exactly perpendicular to what ever surface you put it on. I wish I had found these before I wasted my sparse shop time machining 3 identical aluminum

        Let's assume that you want a 2" OD spindle and tapered roller bearings.  This means that any hole must be at least 3" in diameter.  Now, let's also assume you want a moderate swing lathe, 10" sounds like a decent size.  Also, let's assume that there must be a closed top which will not crack during assembly and use, so add in 1/2", if you need to limit flex, 1" is better. 

        So, how big an angle plate is needed?

        10/2(radius from diameter) or 5" center height PLUS 3/2 (radius from bearing) or 1.5" plus 1" (top strap) yields a minimum height of 7.5", so somewhere around $25 each.  See http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PARTPG=INLMKD&PMPXNO=950670&PMAKA=418-4545 for a good example.  You do need the width so it can clear the bearings and other paraphernalia. 

        Probably the best way to do this is to press/shrink a piece of thick walled DOM into a hole in the CI plate and machine the DOM for bearings and grease seals, this would tend to make the mount very stable and strong.  Unfortunately, a hunk of 3.5" DOM with 1/4" walls is $40!  See part number T2312250 at http://www.metalsdepot.com/products/search.phtml

        It sounds like the best choice is still a custom Cast Iron (CI) or Epoxy Granite (EG) casting.

        Dave  8{)




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