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Re: [multimachine] concrete bench lathe and other things [1 Attachment]

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  • Shannon DeWolfe
    Second attempt. The attachment did not go through. It was shown as a photo but only the file name was viewable. Let s see if it goes through this time...
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 1, 2010
    Second attempt. The attachment did not go through. It was shown as a
    photo but only the file name was viewable. Let's see if it goes through
    this time...

    Regards,

    Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
    --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 54 year old fat man.


    On 9/1/2010 6:37 AM, Shannon DeWolfe wrote:
    > Howdy all,
    >
    > I apologize for the rambling nature of this email. My mail account is
    > bouncing all Yahoo Group emails and maybe personal emails too, I don't
    > know. I visited the multimachine group web page and saw several posts.
    > This email is a response to all I saw.
    >
    > As of this moment I am still not receiving emails from Yahoo Groups. If
    > I am slow to respond, that is why.
    >
    > Concrete poured in thin cross-section will sag and break of its own
    > weight. There are park benches at work I need to photograph that clearly
    > illustrate that thicker is better for simple concrete designs. I am sure
    > there are engineered solutions to solve the problems of thin section
    > concrete. But, would those solutions be available to someone with no
    > money and no engineering background?
    >
    > Keep in mind the intended builder and would be user of this lathe; the
    > village blacksmith/mechanic/Mr. Fixit who learned his trade as an
    > apprentice. Most likely he has no education and therefore cannot read.
    > Written instructions would be of no use to him. The final design of the
    > lathe has to be repeatable using nothing but drawings, junkyard and
    > woodlot sourced parts, bags of cement, and water. Anything more exotic
    > or more expensive than that will not solve the problem of providing a
    > lathe for this person.
    >
    > If portability is a design goal, we need to settle on a size. Maybe we
    > should build two lathes; one fully functional bench top lathe small
    > enough to ship by plane to whatever venue is necessary to show the
    > concept. The second lathe should be built to meet Pat's specs of a
    > universal lathe with a spindle center 16" above the bed. We could
    > document the build and film it working to run as a movie or slide show
    > in the background while the bench lathe is demonstrated live. Or
    > something like that. ;-)
    >
    > I have some ideas for a bench lathe that might solve the problems of
    > pipe ways and thin section concrete. What if the ways are embedded in
    > vertical concrete supports? The entire bed and head stock consists of
    > four concrete blocks bolted together with six pieces of all-thread. The
    > front way is round section embedded in the concrete during the pour. The
    > rear way is RHS turned up (diamond shape) and likewise embedded during
    > the concrete pour.
    >
    > See attached drawings. I have omitted inserts and reinforcement from the
    > drawings in an effort to present a little more understandable drawing.
    > Shop drawings will call out necessary hardware and reinforcement.
    > Dimensions shown are for a point of reference; I don't claim this is the
    > best size, just one that I think would breakdown into several pieces
    > that could be crated for transport at freight rates. Comments,
    > criticism, discussion welcomed.
    >
  • Shannon DeWolfe
    Same result second time around. I posted the drawings in the multimachine library (that I didn t know about until Pat s recent post). If you really want to see
    Message 2 of 6 , Sep 1, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Same result second time around.

      I posted the drawings in the multimachine library (that I didn't know
      about until Pat's recent post). If you really want to see the drawings
      you can find the jpg here:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Multimachine_Library/files/concrete%20bench%20lathe/

      Regards,

      Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
      --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 54 year old fat man.


      On 9/1/2010 6:59 AM, Shannon DeWolfe wrote:
      > Second attempt. The attachment did not go through. It was shown as a
      > photo but only the file name was viewable. Let's see if it goes through
      > this time...
    • Pat Delany
      Absolutely wonderful ideas! About email, I ll check your group settings but be sure that the group from address is in your address book.
      Message 3 of 6 , Sep 1, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        Absolutely wonderful ideas!
        About email, I'll check your group settings but be sure that the group "from address" is in your address book.


        From: Shannon DeWolfe <sdewolfe@...>
        To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wed, September 1, 2010 6:37:42 AM
        Subject: [multimachine] concrete bench lathe and other things [1 Attachment]

         

        Howdy all,

        I apologize for the rambling nature of this email. My mail account is
        bouncing all Yahoo Group emails and maybe personal emails too, I don't
        know. I visited the multimachine group web page and saw several posts.
        This email is a response to all I saw.

        As of this moment I am still not receiving emails from Yahoo Groups. If
        I am slow to respond, that is why.

        Concrete poured in thin cross-section will sag and break of its own
        weight. There are park benches at work I need to photograph that clearly
        illustrate that thicker is better for simple concrete designs. I am sure
        there are engineered solutions to solve the problems of thin section
        concrete. But, would those solutions be available to someone with no
        money and no engineering background?

        Keep in mind the intended builder and would be user of this lathe; the
        village blacksmith/mechanic/Mr. Fixit who learned his trade as an
        apprentice. Most likely he has no education and therefore cannot read.
        Written instructions would be of no use to him. The final design of the
        lathe has to be repeatable using nothing but drawings, junkyard and
        woodlot sourced parts, bags of cement, and water. Anything more exotic
        or more expensive than that will not solve the problem of providing a
        lathe for this person.

        If portability is a design goal, we need to settle on a size. Maybe we
        should build two lathes; one fully functional bench top lathe small
        enough to ship by plane to whatever venue is necessary to show the
        concept. The second lathe should be built to meet Pat's specs of a
        universal lathe with a spindle center 16" above the bed. We could
        document the build and film it working to run as a movie or slide show
        in the background while the bench lathe is demonstrated live. Or
        something like that. ;-)

        I have some ideas for a bench lathe that might solve the problems of
        pipe ways and thin section concrete. What if the ways are embedded in
        vertical concrete supports? The entire bed and head stock consists of
        four concrete blocks bolted together with six pieces of all-thread. The
        front way is round section embedded in the concrete during the pour. The
        rear way is RHS turned up (diamond shape) and likewise embedded during
        the concrete pour.

        See attached drawings. I have omitted inserts and reinforcement from the
        drawings in an effort to present a little more understandable drawing.
        Shop drawings will call out necessary hardware and reinforcement.
        Dimensions shown are for a point of reference; I don't claim this is the
        best size, just one that I think would breakdown into several pieces
        that could be crated for transport at freight rates. Comments,
        criticism, discussion welcomed.

        --
        Regards,

        Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
        --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 54 year old fat man.


      • David Wimberley
        Perhaps you guys should consider ferrocement. This is a concrete with fine aggregate, heavily reinforced with things like fencing, chicken wire, hardware
        Message 4 of 6 , Sep 2, 2010
        • 0 Attachment

          Perhaps you guys should consider ferrocement.  This is a concrete with fine aggregate, heavily reinforced with things like fencing, chicken wire, hardware cloth etc.

           

          Any event it is a fun concept, and potentially applicable to a bench lathe.  dw

           

          David Wimberley

           

          540-665-2124

           

          Wimberley, Inc.

          974 Baker Lane

          Winchester, VA   22603

           

          www.tripodhead.com

           

           

        • Pat Delany
          Guys About David, he is one of the few guys who makes a living with something he invented. He also invented a great cutting tool and wrote about it in a recent
          Message 5 of 6 , Sep 2, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            Guys
            About David, he is one of the few guys who makes a living with something he invented. He also invented a great cutting tool and wrote about it in a recent HSM.

            Pat


            From: David Wimberley <davidwi@...>
            To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thu, September 2, 2010 8:05:52 AM
            Subject: [multimachine] Re:concrete bench lathe and other things

             

            Perhaps you guys should consider ferrocement.  This is a concrete with fine aggregate, heavily reinforced with things like fencing, chicken wire, hardware cloth etc.

             

            Any event it is a fun concept, and potentially applicable to a bench lathe.  dw

             

            David Wimberley

             

            540-665-2124

             

            Wimberley, Inc.

            974 Baker Lane

            Winchester, VA   22603

             

            www.tripodhead.com

             

             


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