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leadscrew backlash prevention

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  • Pat
    Sorta similar to what was discussed here earlier http://cncbridges.com/PDF%20Files/Assembly%20Instructions%20Z.pdf
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 5, 2010
      Sorta similar to what was discussed here earlier

      http://cncbridges.com/PDF%20Files/Assembly%20Instructions%20Z.pdf
    • HB
      That design can be modified by installing a spring between the leadscrew nut and the leadscrew tensioner. The adjustment for wear would be automatic. ...
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 5, 2010


        That design can be modified by installing a spring between the leadscrew nut and the leadscrew tensioner. The adjustment for wear would be automatic.

        --- On Mon, 7/5/10, Pat <rigmatch@...> wrote:

        From: Pat <rigmatch@...>
        Subject: [multimachine] leadscrew backlash prevention
        To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Monday, July 5, 2010, 10:03 AM

         
        Sorta similar to what was discussed here earlier

        http://cncbridges.com/PDF%20Files/Assembly%20Instructions%20Z.pdf


      • keith gutshall
        Hello Pat I looked at the photos ,how much room does the thing take up?  It looks like about 2 1/2 to 3in space for the leadscrew nut.  Can the MM be
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 5, 2010
          Hello Pat
          I looked at the photos ,how much room does the thing take up?
           It looks like about 2 1/2 to 3in space for the leadscrew nut.
           Can the MM be designed for that much space for the leadscrew
           nut?
           
           Keith

          Deep Run Portage
          Back Shop
          " The Lizard Works"

          --- On Mon, 7/5/10, Pat <rigmatch@...> wrote:

          From: Pat <rigmatch@...>
          Subject: [multimachine] leadscrew backlash prevention
          To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Monday, July 5, 2010, 12:03 PM

           
          Sorta similar to what was discussed here earlier

          http://cncbridges.com/PDF%20Files/Assembly%20Instructions%20Z.pdf


        • Shannon DeWolfe
          Howdy all, I ve been reading about cement, forming, and concrete in general over the holiday weekend. The most information is available at the Portland Cement
          Message 4 of 10 , Jul 6, 2010
            Howdy all,

            I've been reading about cement, forming, and concrete in general over
            the holiday weekend. The most information is available at the Portland
            Cement Association web site. http://www.cement.org/
            Be sure to check out their "Learning" pages.

            An article about Hardinge, Maier, and others that use Poly Concrete:
            http://www.americanmachinist.com/304/Issue/Article/False/80845/Issue

            From encyclopedia.com:
            ...cement with a high sulfate content is used in complex castings,
            because it expands upon hardening, filling small spaces.

            http://www.encyclopedia.com/topic/cement.aspx#1E1-cement

            Eliminating surface voids:
            http://www.smooth-on.com/pages.php?pID=59&cID=13
          • Shannon DeWolfe
            Howdy all, I am not stupid. But I am certainly ignorant. The more I ve been reading, the more I realized that I did not understand several terms that I was
            Message 5 of 10 , Jul 6, 2010
              Howdy all,

              I am not stupid. But I am certainly ignorant.

              The more I've been reading, the more I realized that I did not
              understand several terms that I was reading again and again. The most
              common term I've encountered has been "involute gear". Knowing that
              "involute" means curving around a base diameter, basically a spiral, I
              had an idea of what an involute gear might be. I looked it up. It is far
              more involved than defining a point curving around a base circle. It has
              to do with keeping a constant ratio of rotational speed between the
              drive gear and the driven gear. That is why gear teeth are shaped as
              they are.

              If you are just beginning, like me, you should visit this site. Be sure
              to watch the animations. There is nothing like seeing what it means in
              action. Involute gears are explained on page 9:

              http://science.howstuffworks.com/gear.htm

              Then get this PDF from Boston gear:

              http://www.bostongear.com/pdf/gear_theory.pdf

              Another common term is "pinion gear". I thought a pinion gear is the
              driving gear. Not necessarily. It is simply the smallest gear in a gear set.

              I need to study at least one term every night.

              Regards,

              Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
              --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 54 year old fat man.
            • keith gutshall
              Hello Shannon Designing a machine is not as easy as it looks.  Sometimes the size of one part is the size eveything else  works off of.  I sometimes draw
              Message 6 of 10 , Jul 6, 2010
                Hello Shannon
                Designing a machine is not as easy as it looks.
                 Sometimes the size of one part is the size eveything else
                 works off of.
                 I sometimes draw out a part full size to see how things are
                 going to work out. Parts end up bigger than you think they
                 shoud be.
                 
                 Keith

                Deep Run Portage
                Back Shop
                " The Lizard Works"

                --- On Tue, 7/6/10, Shannon DeWolfe <sdewolfe@...> wrote:

                From: Shannon DeWolfe <sdewolfe@...>
                Subject: [multimachine] For beginners, like me.
                To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Tuesday, July 6, 2010, 8:01 AM

                 
                Howdy all,

                I am not stupid. But I am certainly ignorant.

                The more I've been reading, the more I realized that I did not
                understand several terms that I was reading again and again. The most
                common term I've encountered has been "involute gear". Knowing that
                "involute" means curving around a base diameter, basically a spiral, I
                had an idea of what an involute gear might be. I looked it up. It is far
                more involved than defining a point curving around a base circle. It has
                to do with keeping a constant ratio of rotational speed between the
                drive gear and the driven gear. That is why gear teeth are shaped as
                they are.

                If you are just beginning, like me, you should visit this site. Be sure
                to watch the animations. There is nothing like seeing what it means in
                action. Involute gears are explained on page 9:

                http://science.howstuffworks.com/gear.htm

                Then get this PDF from Boston gear:

                http://www.bostongear.com/pdf/gear_theory.pdf

                Another common term is "pinion gear". I thought a pinion gear is the
                driving gear. Not necessarily. It is simply the smallest gear in a gear set.

                I need to study at least one term every night.

                Regards,

                Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
                --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 54 year old fat man.


              • michael broadbent
                Hi,     This is just a observation for those that have problems with so called technical terms. Having been in some sort of engineering since 15years old (I
                Message 7 of 10 , Jul 6, 2010
                  Hi,
                      This is just a observation for those that have problems with so called technical terms.
                  Having been in some sort of engineering since 15years old (I am now 68 years young) I have always been amused how different trades use different jargon but mean the same thing.
                  Thank you for the link How stuff works.I believe the day you cannot learn something new is the day life as stopped.
                   
                  Mikeafloat

                  --- On Tue, 6/7/10, keith gutshall <drpshops@...> wrote:

                  From: keith gutshall <drpshops@...>
                  Subject: Re: [multimachine] For beginners, like me.
                  To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Tuesday, 6 July, 2010, 14:31



                  Hello Shannon
                  Designing a machine is not as easy as it looks.
                   Sometimes the size of one part is the size eveything else
                   works off of.
                   I sometimes draw out a part full size to see how things are
                   going to work out. Parts end up bigger than you think they
                   shoud be.
                   
                   Keith

                  Deep Run Portage
                  Back Shop
                  " The Lizard Works"

                  --- On Tue, 7/6/10, Shannon DeWolfe <sdewolfe@...> wrote:

                  From: Shannon DeWolfe <sdewolfe@...>
                  Subject: [multimachine] For beginners, like me.
                  To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Tuesday, July 6, 2010, 8:01 AM

                   
                  Howdy all,

                  I am not stupid. But I am certainly ignorant.

                  The more I've been reading, the more I realized that I did not
                  understand several terms that I was reading again and again. The most
                  common term I've encountered has been "involute gear". Knowing that
                  "involute" means curving around a base diameter, basically a spiral, I
                  had an idea of what an involute gear might be. I looked it up. It is far
                  more involved than defining a point curving around a base circle. It has
                  to do with keeping a constant ratio of rotational speed between the
                  drive gear and the driven gear. That is why gear teeth are shaped as
                  they are.

                  If you are just beginning, like me, you should visit this site. Be sure
                  to watch the animations. There is nothing like seeing what it means in
                  action. Involute gears are explained on page 9:

                  http://science.howstuffworks.com/gear.htm

                  Then get this PDF from Boston gear:

                  http://www.bostongear.com/pdf/gear_theory.pdf

                  Another common term is "pinion gear". I thought a pinion gear is the
                  driving gear. Not necessarily. It is simply the smallest gear in a gear set.

                  I need to study at least one term every night.

                  Regards,

                  Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
                  --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 54 year old fat man.





                • David G. LeVine
                  Keith, Just to expand on your comment, sometimes too big seems unnecessary, but later experience shows that it was not too big. Sometimes, just right
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jul 6, 2010
                    Keith,

                    Just to expand on your comment, sometimes "too big" seems unnecessary, but later experience shows that it was not too big.  Sometimes, "just right" works for a while, but then the parts fail at unexpected intervals.

                    For example, at one time I had a Fiberfab Valkyrie, the transmission was just fine, for a few hundred miles.  Transmissions failed about every 18 months. 

                    A multimachine which needs maintenance every few months may not be as good an idea as one which needs maintenance every few years or so.

                    A multimachine making tool which is designed to make one or two multimachines and then be scrapped can have a limited life, but will surely wind up being used long after the multimachine is done.

                    On 07/06/2010 09:31 AM, keith gutshall wrote:
                    Hello Shannon
                    Designing a machine is not as easy as it looks.
                     Sometimes the size of one part is the size eveything else
                     works off of.
                     I sometimes draw out a part full size to see how things are
                     going to work out. Parts end up bigger than you think they
                     shoud be.
                     
                     Keith

                    Deep Run Portage
                    Back Shop
                    " The Lizard Works"

                  • Shannon DeWolfe
                    Howdy, If you have not worked as a machinist or mechanical engineer you really need to visit this page: http://www.qtcgears.com/Q410/Q420cat.html There you
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jul 7, 2010
                      Howdy,

                      If you have not worked as a machinist or mechanical engineer you really
                      need to visit this page:
                      http://www.qtcgears.com/Q410/Q420cat.html

                      There you will find an in-depth explanation of gears and terminology.
                      Lots of reading. The download list links to ZIP files that open into PDF
                      files. If you bypass the list, scroll to the bottom, and click on the
                      little gear next to the names of each section listed horizontally at the
                      bottom of the page the chapters open as PDF directly in your browser.
                      Then you can "Save a Copy" locally. It is the same information found in
                      the ZIP links but easier if you have broadband. I also noticed that the
                      drawings are cleaner in the non-ZIP version.

                      Regards,

                      Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
                      --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 54 year old fat man.
                    • Robert
                      Message 10 of 10 , Jul 7, 2010
                        --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, michael broadbent <bargemaster24@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Hi,
                        >     This is just a observation for those that have problems with so called technical terms.
                        > Having been in some sort of engineering since 15years old (I am now 68 years young) I have always been amused how different trades use different jargon but mean the same thing.
                        > Thank you for the link How stuff works.I believe the day you cannot learn something new is the day life as stopped.
                        >  
                        > Mikeafloat
                        >
                        > --- On Tue, 6/7/10, keith gutshall <drpshops@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Great find Shannon. I too am occasionally mystified by the disparity in terms from skill group to skill group. One group calls an item one thing while another calls it something completely different. Same exact thing, different terminology. I really like the link you found, very illuminating as far as gears and naming conventions in addition to the animations to demonstrate them too. Good Deal!!!!
                        > From: keith gutshall <drpshops@...>
                        > Subject: Re: [multimachine] For beginners, like me.
                        > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                        > Date: Tuesday, 6 July, 2010, 14:31
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Hello Shannon
                        > Designing a machine is not as easy as it looks.
                        >  Sometimes the size of one part is the size eveything else
                        >  works off of.
                        >  I sometimes draw out a part full size to see how things are
                        >  going to work out. Parts end up bigger than you think they
                        >  shoud be.
                        >  
                        >  Keith
                        >
                        > Deep Run Portage
                        > Back Shop
                        > " The Lizard Works"
                        >
                        > --- On Tue, 7/6/10, Shannon DeWolfe <sdewolfe@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > From: Shannon DeWolfe <sdewolfe@...>
                        > Subject: [multimachine] For beginners, like me.
                        > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
                        > Date: Tuesday, July 6, 2010, 8:01 AM
                        >
                        >
                        >  
                        >
                        > Howdy all,
                        >
                        > I am not stupid. But I am certainly ignorant.
                        >
                        > The more I've been reading, the more I realized that I did not
                        > understand several terms that I was reading again and again. The most
                        > common term I've encountered has been "involute gear". Knowing that
                        > "involute" means curving around a base diameter, basically a spiral, I
                        > had an idea of what an involute gear might be. I looked it up. It is far
                        > more involved than defining a point curving around a base circle. It has
                        > to do with keeping a constant ratio of rotational speed between the
                        > drive gear and the driven gear. That is why gear teeth are shaped as
                        > they are.
                        >
                        > If you are just beginning, like me, you should visit this site. Be sure
                        > to watch the animations. There is nothing like seeing what it means in
                        > action. Involute gears are explained on page 9:
                        >
                        > http://science.howstuffworks.com/gear.htm
                        >
                        > Then get this PDF from Boston gear:
                        >
                        > http://www.bostongear.com/pdf/gear_theory.pdf
                        >
                        > Another common term is "pinion gear". I thought a pinion gear is the
                        > driving gear. Not necessarily. It is simply the smallest gear in a gear set.
                        >
                        > I need to study at least one term every night.
                        >
                        > Regards,
                        >
                        > Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
                        > --I've taken to using Mr. because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 54 year old fat man.
                        >
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