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[?? Probable Spam] Re: Re[multimachine] Plans for big wooden pulleys

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  • oldstudentmsgt
    He s aleady been there, carried everything he could carry, and left it there. There are a LOT more people who didn t get to meet him, or get whatever he could
    Message 1 of 32 , Oct 9, 2009
      He's aleady been there, carried everything he could carry, and left it there. There are a LOT more people who didn't get to meet him, or get whatever he could take with him to get them started, and not many people who are willing to spend all they have to do things like that. He's trying to help the self-starters who have the gumption to go out and find what they can, and get started, rather than waiting for another handout.

      Most folks just send money, which winds up in the hands of the dictators and corrupt officials, of which Africa is amply supplied, and spent on more weapons or squirelled away in Swiss banks. I like guns as much as the next guy, and maybo more than most, but that doesn't solve many of the problems most of Africa shares, and neither does that money going into some dictator's bank account. Last I looked there are over 800 languages spoken there, and IIRC, 70-some countries. Africa is a HUGE place, and Pat is only one man in his seventies.

      Biii in OKC

      --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, HB <scfpigs@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > Pat,
      >  
      > I'm not sure if I missed a critical part of this story. I thought you are the one who's going to Africa to help them out. Isn't it then possible for you to bring with you the start-up basic tools like pipe threaders, hand saws and cutters, manual grinders or whatever from the USA? There are many cheap one's sold in surplus stores and flea markets all over America. They should easily fit in your luggage within the alloted weight limitations. Once you get the basic tools working, you(or they) could then produce more tools, and sooner or later there would eventually be more available in circulation.
      > You don't have to rediscover technology or reinvent new tools from scratch since it is not exactly a place stuck in the stone age or so isolatd and remotely located where no one could get out to the outside world to source some of the most basic "breeder" tools.  The fact that you were able to  get there reinforces my assumption. You just have to provide a "seed" of the basic tools so that they could "propagate" some more from it on their own locally.
      >  
      > Do we also have an unsurmoutable problems with importation rules in Africa that wasn't previously discussed?
      >  
      > HB
      >  
      >
      > --- On Thu, 10/8/09, Pat Delany <rigmatch@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > From: Pat Delany <rigmatch@...>
      > Subject: Re: [?? Probable Spam] Re: Re[multimachine] Plans for big wooden pulleys
      > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Thursday, October 8, 2009, 12:37 PM
      >
      >
      >  
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Andy,
      > The machine was designed to be made from junkedcar parts and still be reasonably accurate. These people make from 1 to 3 bucks a day and could not afford anything imported (except used cell phones!).
      >
      >
      > Pat
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > From: Andrew Mathison <andrewdavid. mathison@ freenet.de>
      > To: multimachine@ yahoogroups. com
      > Sent: Thu, October 8, 2009 1:33:29 PM
      > Subject: Re: [?? Probable Spam] Re: Re[multimachine] Plans for big wooden pulleys
      >
      >  
      >
      >
      >
      > Can the parts not be made then in Europe or the USA - or somewhere where machines exist to do the work.....and then sent to Africa(?). At some point in the future maybe they can help themselves in an easier manner....
      >  
      > Just a thought.
      >  
      > Greetings from
      >  
      > Andy Mathison
      >
    • Jerry Scovel
      Thank you. The internet is nice to have but in the end I can use shortwave radio for communication if there is no signal from the bird. Years ago I had an old
      Message 32 of 32 , Oct 17, 2009
        Thank you. The internet is nice to have but in the end I can use
        shortwave radio for communication if there is no signal from the bird.
        Years ago I had an old bag phone (5 lb. cell phone) that would pick up
        a signal anywhere and sounded as good as a land line. Now I have a
        modern cell phone that weighs only a few ounces but does not work very
        well and sounds like AM radio at best. I like older, proven
        technologies...


        On Oct 17, 2009, at 9:12 AM, prolinuxfan wrote:

        Good luck and success in your ventures no matter what obstacles you
        encounter, though :)

        Allen
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