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  • Alain
    Hello all, As you know astrology is a scam. One has to be stupid, with today s knowledge, to imagine that the celestial objects influence the lives of human.
    Message 1 of 60 , Nov 8, 2010
      Hello all,
      As you know astrology is a scam. One has to be stupid, with today's
      knowledge, to imagine that the celestial objects influence the lives of
      human. This is a ridiculous idea.
      Except...
      It does change the lives of astronomers. A stupid rock at the end of the
      solar system happens to pass just in front of a completely unknown star as
      seen from your garden, and you get a lot more work and a lot less sleep for
      several days.
      So yes we were lucky to be behind the shadow. There is the story written by
      Kelly Beatty on the Sky and Telescope page, but I wrote a personal account
      at http://www.spaceobs.com/perso/recherche/Eris/
      We can't give precise numbers (Bruno Sicardy will submit a letter to Nature
      with all the good stuff :)), we are still improving the data reduction etc..
      but it is relatively clear that Eris is smaller than Pluto. Look at the good
      side, it is also whiter and for those who have an interest in it, Pluto is
      back as the largest asteroid in the solar system.
      So for now I guess I will just have to write a book entitled "How I (was
      part of a team which) killed Eris, and why it had it coming". Lot more work,
      I tell you :)
      Alain



      -----Original Message-----
      From: mpml@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mpml@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Alain
      Sent: lundi 8 novembre 2010 17:04
      To: 'Fiona Vincent'
      Cc: 'mpml mpml \(list\)'
      Subject: {MPML} Eris

      Yes :)
      http://www.skyandtelescope.com/news/106861063.html
      Alain


      -----Original Message-----
      From: mpml@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mpml@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Fiona
      Vincent
      Sent: lundi 8 novembre 2010 16:27
      To: Alain
      Cc: 'mpml mpml \(list\)'
      Subject: Re: {Disarmed} RE: {MPML} An Early Warning System for Asteroid
      Impact



      On Fri, 5 Nov 2010, Alain wrote:

      > For now getting ready for the no occultation of Eris tonight :)


      Don't keep us in suspense! Did you see an occultation?

      Fiona


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      Le message a iti virifii par ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

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    • Marshall Eubanks
      Ah, thanks for catching that... Marshall
      Message 60 of 60 , Nov 9, 2010
        Ah, thanks for catching that...

        Marshall


        On Nov 9, 2010, at 8:24 PM, Paulo Holvorcem wrote:

        > Just a correction: Eris has a 561-year orbit and is now past aphelion
        > at 96.6 AU from the sun. The famous, large distant object with a period
        > longer than 10,000 years orbit and which is moving toward perihelion is
        > Sedna.
        >
        > Paulo
        >
        > On 2010-11-09 23:06, Marshall Eubanks wrote:
        >>
        >>
        >> On Nov 9, 2010, at 5:46 PM, RICHARD MILES wrote:
        >>
        >>> This is where chemistry is important. Usually people consider nitrogen
        >>> frost and methane frost at the distance of Pluto but the temperature out
        >>> there at 96 AU is probably low enough to have solid hydrogen frost even in a
        >>> near-vacuum. You don't need a large mass fraction to be present to alter
        >>> the appearance of the surface so the fact the bulk density of Eris is high
        >>> is not so critical. How about a world near the surface having geysers of
        >>> liquid hydrogen and where on a cold day it snows flakes of solid hydrogen?
        >>>
        >>
        >> First, there is this press report from the DPS
        >>
        >> http://www.astronomynow.com/news/n1010/06eris/
        >>
        >> Second, remember that Eris is in spring moving towards summer on its 10+ kiloyear orbit.
        >>
        >> Whatever is coating the surface could be a relatively recent deposition .
        >>
        >> Has anyone done thermal models to see if Hydrogen could freeze in winter to evaporate at the sub-solar point as summer approaches ?
        >>
        >> Regards
        >> Marshall
        >
        >
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