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2008 TC3 impact flash observations

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  • Bill J Gray
    http://home.pages.at/thie/asteroid_2008_tc3/ (Above is in German; English translation is at)
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 20, 2008
      http://home.pages.at/thie/asteroid_2008_tc3/

      (Above is in German; English "translation" is at)

      http://translate.google.com/translate?u=http%3A%2F%2Fhome.pages.at%2Fthie%2Fasteroid_2008_tc3%2F&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&sl=de&tl=en

      Apparently, this Webcam about 725 km north of the impact site of
      2008 TC3, in Egypt on the Red Sea, was looking the wrong way to
      see the actual impact flash. However, it does show foreground
      objects illuminated by the flash. There's a full-moon image
      provided for comparison, in which nothing is visible. The
      implication is that the meteor flash was probably much brighter
      than full moon intensity, even at a distance of 725 km.

      The page also claims that the angle of illumination suggests
      that the meteor exploded about 33 km above the ground, after
      allowing for refraction and the earth's curvature. (Based
      solely on the distance between the Meteosat-8 image of the flash
      and where it was projected to hit the earth, I'd have thought a
      little lower than that, but could believe 33 km.)

      I do wonder how a flash this bright could have gone unobserved
      elsewhere, but the images don't seem completely unreasonable.

      -- Bill
    • Alain Maury
      Since I have not seen this link passing on mpml, I just put it here http://aquarid.physics.uwo.ca/~pbrown/usaf/usg282.txt Alain
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 20, 2008
        Since I have not seen this link passing on mpml, I just put it here
        http://aquarid.physics.uwo.ca/~pbrown/usaf/usg282.txt
        Alain



        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: mpml@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mpml@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of
        > Bill J Gray
        > Sent: lundi 20 octobre 2008 10:48
        > To: MPML
        > Subject: {MPML} 2008 TC3 impact flash observations
        >
        >
        > http://home.pages.at/thie/asteroid_2008_tc3/
        >
        > (Above is in German; English "translation" is at)
        >
        > http://translate.google.com/translate?u=http%3A%2F%2Fhome.pages.at
        > %2Fthie%2Fasteroid_2008_tc3%2F&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&sl=de&tl=en
        >
        > Apparently, this Webcam about 725 km north of the impact site of
        > 2008 TC3, in Egypt on the Red Sea, was looking the wrong way to
        > see the actual impact flash. However, it does show foreground
        > objects illuminated by the flash. There's a full-moon image
        > provided for comparison, in which nothing is visible. The
        > implication is that the meteor flash was probably much brighter
        > than full moon intensity, even at a distance of 725 km.
        >
        > The page also claims that the angle of illumination suggests
        > that the meteor exploded about 33 km above the ground, after
        > allowing for refraction and the earth's curvature. (Based
        > solely on the distance between the Meteosat-8 image of the flash
        > and where it was projected to hit the earth, I'd have thought a
        > little lower than that, but could believe 33 km.)
        >
        > I do wonder how a flash this bright could have gone unobserved
        > elsewhere, but the images don't seem completely unreasonable.
        >
        > -- Bill
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        >
        > Posts to this list or information found within may be freely
        > used, with the stipulation that MPML and the originating author
        > are cited as the source of the information.Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
      • Alan Cahill
        Hi Bill, I suggested this not long ago that there must be a CCTV camera somewhere that spotted the flash. Seems as though one did. However, one thing I would
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 20, 2008
          Hi Bill,

          I suggested this not long ago that there must be a CCTV camera somewhere
          that spotted the flash. Seems as though one did.
          However, one thing I would like to know is
          (1) Was the camera just taking stills or
          (2) Was there an actual video made?

          I feel sure it wasn't just 1, after all why would it have taken an image
          with no light showing?
          What I'm trying to say is that a short video would tell us for sure if
          it was the event. The initial flash would have been instant, however,
          the residual glow and fading afterwards would be a clincher for me, and
          very worth seeing.

          My 2 cents worth!

          Best Regards

          Alan

          In message <48FC8C07.4030609@...>, Bill J Gray
          <pluto@...> writes
          >
          > http://home.pages.at/thie/asteroid_2008_tc3/
          >
          > (Above is in German; English "translation" is at)
          >
          > http://translate.google.com/translate?u=http%3A%2F%2Fhome.pages.at%
          > 2Fthie%2Fasteroid_2008_tc3%2F&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&sl=de&tl=en
          >
          > Apparently, this Webcam about 725 km north of the impact site of
          > 2008 TC3, in Egypt on the Red Sea, was looking the wrong way to
          > see the actual impact flash. However, it does show foreground
          > objects illuminated by the flash. There's a full-moon image
          > provided for comparison, in which nothing is visible. The
          > implication is that the meteor flash was probably much brighter
          > than full moon intensity, even at a distance of 725 km.
          >
          > The page also claims that the angle of illumination suggests
          > that the meteor exploded about 33 km above the ground, after
          > allowing for refraction and the earth's curvature. (Based
          > solely on the distance between the Meteosat-8 image of the flash
          > and where it was projected to hit the earth, I'd have thought a
          > little lower than that, but could believe 33 km.)
          >
          > I do wonder how a flash this bright could have gone unobserved
          > elsewhere, but the images don't seem completely unreasonable.
          >
          > -- Bill
          >

          Alan Cahill (J94)
          Abbeydale Observatory,
          Gloucester.
          UK
          http://mountabbeydale.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk
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