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RE: MOTRAILS Re: MOTRAILS Re: Cedar Creek Trail???

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  • marc poston
    Many of the unofficial backpacking campsites I ve noticed in Cedar Creek (Mark Twain Forest) are closer to the trail than they should be. Ideally, it would be
    Message 1 of 11 , Jan 30, 2013
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      Many of the unofficial backpacking campsites I've noticed in Cedar Creek (Mark Twain Forest) are closer to the trail than they should be.  Ideally, it would be great if backpackers would stop camping in the sites close to the trail and allow them to be reclaimed by the forest.  But I don't see that happening.  This begs the question, is it better to use an already established site that is too close, or to make a new camp in an undisturbed area?  My answer, for what it's worth, would be to make a new camp away from the trail, and leave it with no clue that it was ever a campsite. 
       

      To: motrails@yahoogroups.com
      From: joebancks@...
      Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2013 19:15:56 -0600
      Subject: MOTRAILS Re: MOTRAILS Re: Cedar Creek Trail???



      Nice trail, esp. Smith Creek Loop.
      Camping is permitted anywhere within a National Forest (with some caveats about developed areas, trailheads, waterbodies, etc.). Like Hank said, there are unofficial "campsites" along the way, most with a fire ring. And it's good to call the District office if for no other reason than to ask about trail conditions. My experience is that the first person you talk to won't know much, but can usually put you in touch with someone who does. As to fire bans: unlikely, given how wet central MO has been lately :-)
      Godspeed,
      Joe
      On Jan 29, 2013 6:54 PM, "hankfranklin92" <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
       
      I've been there quite a bit and never saw any "no fires" posted, and any camp I've seen had a fire ring. Pretty much anything goes as far as I experienced it. But yes, check for sure with the proper authorities.




    • Bob Blakey
      Agreed. I use a hammock and tarp as my sleep system so I tend to look for places that are less traveled. If I can find a good location away from the trail, I
      Message 2 of 11 , Jan 30, 2013
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        Agreed.  I use a hammock and tarp as my sleep system so I tend to look for places that are less traveled.  If I can find a good location away from the trail, I am one happy hammocker :)
        Bob Blakey


        On Wed, Jan 30, 2013 at 9:27 AM, marc poston <mdposton@...> wrote:
         

        Many of the unofficial backpacking campsites I've noticed in Cedar Creek (Mark Twain Forest) are closer to the trail than they should be.  Ideally, it would be great if backpackers would stop camping in the sites close to the trail and allow them to be reclaimed by the forest.  But I don't see that happening.  This begs the question, is it better to use an already established site that is too close, or to make a new camp in an undisturbed area?  My answer, for what it's worth, would be to make a new camp away from the trail, and leave it with no clue that it was ever a campsite. 
         

        To: motrails@yahoogroups.com
        From: joebancks@...
        Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2013 19:15:56 -0600
        Subject: MOTRAILS Re: MOTRAILS Re: Cedar Creek Trail???




        Nice trail, esp. Smith Creek Loop.
        Camping is permitted anywhere within a National Forest (with some caveats about developed areas, trailheads, waterbodies, etc.). Like Hank said, there are unofficial "campsites" along the way, most with a fire ring. And it's good to call the District office if for no other reason than to ask about trail conditions. My experience is that the first person you talk to won't know much, but can usually put you in touch with someone who does. As to fire bans: unlikely, given how wet central MO has been lately :-)
        Godspeed,
        Joe
        On Jan 29, 2013 6:54 PM, "hankfranklin92" <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
         
        I've been there quite a bit and never saw any "no fires" posted, and any camp I've seen had a fire ring. Pretty much anything goes as far as I experienced it. But yes, check for sure with the proper authorities.





      • Eric Shelton
        Exactly my style as well. Camp way off trail and leave no trace. I will not be using an established camp. sent from my android phone.
        Message 3 of 11 , Jan 30, 2013
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          Exactly my style as well. Camp way off trail and leave no trace. I will not be using an established camp.

          sent from my android phone.

          On Jan 30, 2013 9:34 AM, "Bob Blakey" <kerflop@...> wrote:
           

          Agreed.  I use a hammock and tarp as my sleep system so I tend to look for places that are less traveled.  If I can find a good location away from the trail, I am one happy hammocker :)

          Bob Blakey


          On Wed, Jan 30, 2013 at 9:27 AM, marc poston <mdposton@...> wrote:
           

          Many of the unofficial backpacking campsites I've noticed in Cedar Creek (Mark Twain Forest) are closer to the trail than they should be.  Ideally, it would be great if backpackers would stop camping in the sites close to the trail and allow them to be reclaimed by the forest.  But I don't see that happening.  This begs the question, is it better to use an already established site that is too close, or to make a new camp in an undisturbed area?  My answer, for what it's worth, would be to make a new camp away from the trail, and leave it with no clue that it was ever a campsite. 
           

          To: motrails@yahoogroups.com
          From: joebancks@...
          Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2013 19:15:56 -0600
          Subject: MOTRAILS Re: MOTRAILS Re: Cedar Creek Trail???




          Nice trail, esp. Smith Creek Loop.
          Camping is permitted anywhere within a National Forest (with some caveats about developed areas, trailheads, waterbodies, etc.). Like Hank said, there are unofficial "campsites" along the way, most with a fire ring. And it's good to call the District office if for no other reason than to ask about trail conditions. My experience is that the first person you talk to won't know much, but can usually put you in touch with someone who does. As to fire bans: unlikely, given how wet central MO has been lately :-)
          Godspeed,
          Joe
          On Jan 29, 2013 6:54 PM, "hankfranklin92" <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
           
          I've been there quite a bit and never saw any "no fires" posted, and any camp I've seen had a fire ring. Pretty much anything goes as far as I experienced it. But yes, check for sure with the proper authorities.





        • Joe B.
          I know some of us have done BWCAW and Superior Hiking Trail trips. Any love for the latrines and fire grates? I, for one, think they re a reasonable solution
          Message 4 of 11 , Jan 30, 2013
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            I know some of us have done BWCAW and Superior Hiking Trail trips.

            Any love for the latrines and fire grates? I, for one, think they're a reasonable solution which incentivizes small, manageable, localized footprints.

            What would a conversation be without a contrarian?

            Peace,
            Joe

            On Wed, Jan 30, 2013 at 9:37 AM, Eric Shelton <ericbshelton@...> wrote:
             

            Exactly my style as well. Camp way off trail and leave no trace. I will not be using an established camp.

            sent from my android phone.

            On Jan 30, 2013 9:34 AM, "Bob Blakey" <kerflop@...> wrote:
             

            Agreed.  I use a hammock and tarp as my sleep system so I tend to look for places that are less traveled.  If I can find a good location away from the trail, I am one happy hammocker :)

            Bob Blakey


            On Wed, Jan 30, 2013 at 9:27 AM, marc poston <mdposton@...> wrote:
             

            Many of the unofficial backpacking campsites I've noticed in Cedar Creek (Mark Twain Forest) are closer to the trail than they should be.  Ideally, it would be great if backpackers would stop camping in the sites close to the trail and allow them to be reclaimed by the forest.  But I don't see that happening.  This begs the question, is it better to use an already established site that is too close, or to make a new camp in an undisturbed area?  My answer, for what it's worth, would be to make a new camp away from the trail, and leave it with no clue that it was ever a campsite. 
             

            To: motrails@yahoogroups.com
            From: joebancks@...
            Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2013 19:15:56 -0600
            Subject: MOTRAILS Re: MOTRAILS Re: Cedar Creek Trail???




            Nice trail, esp. Smith Creek Loop.
            Camping is permitted anywhere within a National Forest (with some caveats about developed areas, trailheads, waterbodies, etc.). Like Hank said, there are unofficial "campsites" along the way, most with a fire ring. And it's good to call the District office if for no other reason than to ask about trail conditions. My experience is that the first person you talk to won't know much, but can usually put you in touch with someone who does. As to fire bans: unlikely, given how wet central MO has been lately :-)
            Godspeed,
            Joe
            On Jan 29, 2013 6:54 PM, "hankfranklin92" <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
             
            I've been there quite a bit and never saw any "no fires" posted, and any camp I've seen had a fire ring. Pretty much anything goes as far as I experienced it. But yes, check for sure with the proper authorities.








            --
            joebancks@... / Twitter @JoeBancks / Blog pilgrimandastranger.blogspot.com / Skype joe.bancks
          • AdamR
            If there happens to be an improvised fire ring I normally camp near it. I like to build a small fire and feel like I m doing less damage there than if I made
            Message 5 of 11 , Jan 30, 2013
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              If there happens to be an improvised fire ring I normally camp near it. I like to build a small fire and feel like I'm doing less damage there than if I made another fire 100 feet away. However, I do feel that most of the campsites I've come across are far too close to the trail. If there isn't any sort of established camp I do my best to make sure I can't tell where I made camp when I leave in the morning.

              The thing is, wading through all the briars, poison ivy, and stinging nettle to get get 100 feet off the trail and away from water sources is not something I look forward to after hiking all day. I'm not in the habit of establishing campsites but I don't have any qualms using one (and cleaning it up a bit) if its already there.

              Adam

              --- In motrails@yahoogroups.com, Eric Shelton wrote:
              >
              > Exactly my style as well. Camp way off trail and leave no trace. I will not
              > be using an established camp.
              >
              > sent from my android phone.
              > On Jan 30, 2013 9:34 AM, "Bob Blakey" wrote:
              >
              > > **
              > >
              > >
              > > Agreed. I use a hammock and tarp as my sleep system so I tend to look for
              > > places that are less traveled. If I can find a good location away from the
              > > trail, I am one happy hammocker :)
              > > Bob Blakey
              > >
              > >
              > > On Wed, Jan 30, 2013 at 9:27 AM, marc poston wrote:
              > >
              > >> **
              > >>
              > >>
              > >> Many of the unofficial backpacking campsites I've noticed in Cedar Creek
              > >> (Mark Twain Forest) are closer to the trail than they should be. Ideally,
              > >> it would be great if backpackers would stop camping in the sites close to
              > >> the trail and allow them to be reclaimed by the forest. But I don't see
              > >> that happening. This begs the question, is it better to use an already
              > >> established site that is too close, or to make a new camp in an undisturbed
              > >> area? My answer, for what it's worth, would be to make a new camp away
              > >> from the trail, and leave it with no clue that it was ever a campsite.
              > >>
              > >> ------------------------------
              > >> To: motrails@yahoogroups.com
              > >> From: joebancks@...
              > >> Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2013 19:15:56 -0600
              > >> Subject: MOTRAILS Re: MOTRAILS Re: Cedar Creek Trail???
              > >>
              > >>
              > >>
              > >>
              > >> Nice trail, esp. Smith Creek Loop.
              > >> Camping is permitted anywhere within a National Forest (with some caveats
              > >> about developed areas, trailheads, waterbodies, etc.). Like Hank said,
              > >> there are unofficial "campsites" along the way, most with a fire ring. And
              > >> it's good to call the District office if for no other reason than to ask
              > >> about trail conditions. My experience is that the first person you talk to
              > >> won't know much, but can usually put you in touch with someone who does. As
              > >> to fire bans: unlikely, given how wet central MO has been lately :-)
              > >> Godspeed,
              > >> Joe
              > >> On Jan 29, 2013 6:54 PM, "hankfranklin92"
              > >> wrote:
              > >>
              > >> **
              > >>
              > >> I've been there quite a bit and never saw any "no fires" posted, and
              > >> any camp I've seen had a fire ring. Pretty much anything goes as far as I
              > >> experienced it. But yes, check for sure with the proper authorities.
              > >>
              > >>
              > >>
              > >>
              > >>
              > >
              > >
              >
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