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A Most Unusual Note

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  • richmondtiggergray
    An auction of some Mosby articles is being held in Virginia. Among the items is a very strange note from Mosby to his wife written several days after his most
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 11 4:37 PM
      An auction of some Mosby articles is being held in Virginia. Among the items is a very strange note from Mosby to his wife written several days after his most serious wound on December 21st, 1864. The note is not dated but says simply:

      Pauline

      I am Wounded and suffering - "Waveland"

      Jno

      Waveland was the home of Eleanor Selden Washington, widow of John Augustine Washington, great-nephew of George Washington. According to surgeon, Aristides Monteiro, Mosby enjoyed visiting the "lovely and lively young ladies" of "Waveland". However, Mosby did not remain at that place. After a long and difficult journey, he made a stop at "Wheatland", the two-story, clapboard home of Marshall Lake, a son of Ludwell Lake in whose home Mosby was wounded. Here he remained a day or two because the home was located at the base of Wildcat Mountain, a rugged, wild area where Mosby could be easily hidden if the Yankees came 'a calling. He was then smuggled to Culpeper Courthouse and eventually to safety at his parents' home near McIvor's Station. It took a little more than a week to move Mosby from Lake's home where he was wounded to McIvor Station during which he was hunted furiously by Union forces in the area for the entire journey.

      Mosby's note to Pauline is difficult to understand except only in the context of the seriousness of his wound and the agonies he suffered being moved almost constantly since the bullet had been removed on the morning of the 22nd at Quilly Glasscock's home where he was taken immediately after the Union marauders departed the scene. It isn't dated though we know approximately when he was in Washington's home. Most important is the fact that he included the NAME of the place which was dangerous not only for himself (if it had fallen into the wrong hands) but for those with whom he stayed. If it had been intercepted, the Washington's home would surely have been burned even if Mosby had already departed.

      Furthermore, there was no reason to give Pauline that information since he was not going to remain there for any length of time nor did he want her to come to him. As well, most of Mosby's communications with his wife were intended to reassure her when he found himself in difficulties. When he was arrested after the war (and at least once according to an expert, arrangements were underway to actually bring him to trial), he told her "do not be uneasy". Certainly, this note was no attempt at reassurance. Yes, he was alive, but the unusual report of his "suffering" could hardly have been reassuring to his family. It may be that he thought he would die or be captured and THEN die and was attempting to soften the blow. We will obviously never know. But it is certainly a most unusual communication.

      Altogether, it is a most unusual communication but there appears to be little doubt that the note, like the signature, is genuine. But as it makes a pretty puzzle for Mosby aficionados, I thought that the members might enjoy knowing of it.
    • writefromthepast
      Very interesting! Thanks for posting. Where is the auction?
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 11 4:54 PM
        Very interesting! Thanks for posting. Where is the auction?



        --- In mosbysrangers@yahoogroups.com, "richmondtiggergray" <vaproto@...> wrote:
        >
        > An auction of some Mosby articles is being held in Virginia. Among the items is a very strange note from Mosby to his wife written several days after his most serious wound on December 21st, 1864. The note is not dated but says simply:
        >
        > Pauline
        >
        > I am Wounded and suffering - "Waveland"
        >
        > Jno
        >
        > Waveland was the home of Eleanor Selden Washington, widow of John Augustine Washington, great-nephew of George Washington. According to surgeon, Aristides Monteiro, Mosby enjoyed visiting the "lovely and lively young ladies" of "Waveland". However, Mosby did not remain at that place. After a long and difficult journey, he made a stop at "Wheatland", the two-story, clapboard home of Marshall Lake, a son of Ludwell Lake in whose home Mosby was wounded. Here he remained a day or two because the home was located at the base of Wildcat Mountain, a rugged, wild area where Mosby could be easily hidden if the Yankees came 'a calling. He was then smuggled to Culpeper Courthouse and eventually to safety at his parents' home near McIvor's Station. It took a little more than a week to move Mosby from Lake's home where he was wounded to McIvor Station during which he was hunted furiously by Union forces in the area for the entire journey.
        >
        > Mosby's note to Pauline is difficult to understand except only in the context of the seriousness of his wound and the agonies he suffered being moved almost constantly since the bullet had been removed on the morning of the 22nd at Quilly Glasscock's home where he was taken immediately after the Union marauders departed the scene. It isn't dated though we know approximately when he was in Washington's home. Most important is the fact that he included the NAME of the place which was dangerous not only for himself (if it had fallen into the wrong hands) but for those with whom he stayed. If it had been intercepted, the Washington's home would surely have been burned even if Mosby had already departed.
        >
        > Furthermore, there was no reason to give Pauline that information since he was not going to remain there for any length of time nor did he want her to come to him. As well, most of Mosby's communications with his wife were intended to reassure her when he found himself in difficulties. When he was arrested after the war (and at least once according to an expert, arrangements were underway to actually bring him to trial), he told her "do not be uneasy". Certainly, this note was no attempt at reassurance. Yes, he was alive, but the unusual report of his "suffering" could hardly have been reassuring to his family. It may be that he thought he would die or be captured and THEN die and was attempting to soften the blow. We will obviously never know. But it is certainly a most unusual communication.
        >
        > Altogether, it is a most unusual communication but there appears to be little doubt that the note, like the signature, is genuine. But as it makes a pretty puzzle for Mosby aficionados, I thought that the members might enjoy knowing of it.
        >
      • Valerie Protopapas
        I think that the link ­ or ONE of the links ­ is http://www.artfact.com/auction-catalog/confederate-civil-war-auction-9ehkquo xy9 That¹s what I was given.
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 11 6:13 PM
          Re: [mosbysrangers] Re: A Most Unusual Note I think that the link – or ONE of the links – is

          http://www.artfact.com/auction-catalog/confederate-civil-war-auction-9ehkquoxy9

          That’s what I was given.

          Val


          On 4/11/09 7:54 PM, "writefromthepast" <writefromthepast@...> wrote:
           

          Very interesting! Thanks for posting. Where is the auction?

          --- In mosbysrangers@yahoogroups.com <mailto:mosbysrangers%40yahoogroups.com> , "richmondtiggergray" <vaproto@...> wrote:
          >
          > An auction of some Mosby articles is being held in Virginia. Among the items is a very strange note from Mosby to his wife written several days after his most serious wound on December 21st, 1864. The note is not dated but says simply:
          >
          >        Pauline
          >
          >          I am Wounded and suffering - "Waveland"
          >
          >                                 Jno
          >
          > Waveland was the home of Eleanor Selden Washington, widow of John Augustine Washington, great-nephew of George Washington. According to surgeon, Aristides Monteiro, Mosby enjoyed visiting the "lovely and lively young ladies" of "Waveland". However, Mosby did not remain at that place. After a long and difficult journey, he made a stop at "Wheatland", the two-story, clapboard home of Marshall Lake, a son of Ludwell Lake in whose home Mosby was wounded. Here he remained a day or two because the home was located at the base of Wildcat Mountain, a rugged, wild area where Mosby could be easily hidden if the Yankees came 'a calling.  He was then smuggled to Culpeper Courthouse and eventually to safety at his parents' home near McIvor's Station. It took a little more than a week to move Mosby from Lake's home where he was wounded to McIvor Station during which he was hunted furiously by Union forces in the area for the entire journey.
          >
          > Mosby's note to Pauline is difficult to understand except only in the context of the seriousness of his wound and the agonies he suffered being moved almost constantly since the bullet had been removed on the morning of the 22nd at Quilly Glasscock's home where he was taken immediately after the Union marauders departed the scene. It isn't dated though we know approximately when he was in Washington's home. Most important is the fact that he included the NAME of the place which was dangerous not only for himself (if it had fallen into the wrong hands) but for those with whom he stayed. If it had been intercepted, the Washington's home would surely have been burned even if Mosby had already departed.
          >
          > Furthermore, there was no reason to give Pauline that information since he was not going to remain there for any length of time nor did he want her to come to him. As well, most of Mosby's communications with his wife were intended to reassure her when he found himself in difficulties. When he was arrested after the war (and at least once according to an expert, arrangements were underway to actually bring him to trial), he told her "do not be uneasy". Certainly, this note was no attempt at reassurance. Yes, he was alive, but the unusual report of his "suffering" could hardly have been reassuring to his family. It may be that he thought he would die or be captured and THEN die and was attempting to soften the blow. We will obviously never know. But it is certainly a most unusual communication.
          >
          > Altogether, it is a most unusual communication but there appears to be little doubt that the note, like the signature, is genuine. But as it makes a pretty puzzle for Mosby aficionados, I thought that the members might enjoy knowing of it.
          >

            
              



        • Jessica James
          Yes, that was one of them - got me close enough. THANKS!   Look at this one!   Green heavy Civil war ear cape, attributed to having been worn by James F.
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 12 5:34 AM
            Yes, that was one of them - got me close enough. THANKS!
             
            Look at this one!
             
            Green heavy Civil war ear cape, attributed to having been worn by James F. ''Big Yankee'' Ames when he was mortally wounded. Missing lower button.. Green with wide brown collar.
            Estimate : $400 - $800  

            --- On Sat, 4/11/09, Valerie Protopapas <vaproto@...> wrote:

            From: Valerie Protopapas <vaproto@...>
            Subject: Re: [mosbysrangers] Re: A Most Unusual Note
            To: mosbysrangers@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Saturday, April 11, 2009, 9:13 PM

            I think that the link – or ONE of the links – is

            http://www.artfact. com/auction- catalog/confeder ate-civil- war-auction- 9ehkquoxy9

            That’s what I was given.

            Val


            On 4/11/09 7:54 PM, "writefromthepast" <writefromthepast@ yahoo.com> wrote:
             

            Very interesting! Thanks for posting. Where is the auction?

            --- In mosbysrangers@ yahoogroups. com <mailto:mosbysranger s%40yahoogroups. com> , "richmondtiggergray" <vaproto@...> wrote:
            >
            > An auction of some Mosby articles is being held in Virginia. Among the items is a very strange note from Mosby to his wife written several days after his most serious wound on December 21st, 1864. The note is not dated but says simply:
            >
            >        Pauline
            >
            >          I am Wounded and suffering - "Waveland"
            >
            >                                 Jno
            >
            > Waveland was the home of Eleanor Selden Washington, widow of John Augustine Washington, great-nephew of George Washington. According to surgeon, Aristides Monteiro, Mosby enjoyed visiting the "lovely and lively young ladies" of "Waveland". However, Mosby did not remain at that place. After a long and difficult journey, he made a stop at "Wheatland", the two-story, clapboard home of Marshall Lake, a son of Ludwell Lake in whose home Mosby was wounded. Here he remained a day or two because the home was located at the base of Wildcat Mountain, a rugged, wild area where Mosby could be easily hidden if the Yankees came 'a calling.  He was then smuggled to Culpeper Courthouse and eventually to safety at his parents' home near McIvor's Station. It took a little more than a week to move Mosby from Lake's home where he was wounded to McIvor Station during which he was hunted furiously by Union forces in the area for the entire journey.
            >
            > Mosby's note to Pauline is difficult to understand except only in the context of the seriousness of his wound and the agonies he suffered being moved almost constantly since the bullet had been removed on the morning of the 22nd at Quilly Glasscock's home where he was taken immediately after the Union marauders departed the scene. It isn't dated though we know approximately when he was in Washington's home. Most important is the fact that he included the NAME of the place which was dangerous not only for himself (if it had fallen into the wrong hands) but for those with whom he stayed. If it had been intercepted, the Washington's home would surely have been burned even if Mosby had already departed.
            >
            > Furthermore, there was no reason to give Pauline that information since he was not going to remain there for any length of time nor did he want her to come to him. As well, most of Mosby's communications with his wife were intended to reassure her when he found himself in difficulties. When he was arrested after the war (and at least once according to an expert, arrangements were underway to actually bring him to trial), he told her "do not be uneasy". Certainly, this note was no attempt at reassurance. Yes, he was alive, but the unusual report of his "suffering" could hardly have been reassuring to his family. It may be that he thought he would die or be captured and THEN die and was attempting to soften the blow. We will obviously never know. But it is certainly a most unusual communication.
            >
            > Altogether, it is a most unusual communication but there appears to be little doubt that the note, like the signature, is genuine. But as it makes a pretty puzzle for Mosby aficionados, I thought that the members might enjoy knowing of it.
            >

              
                




          • richmondtiggergray
            It was a most interesting auction. Too bad I missed a lot because it took place at dinnertime and I couldn t bear my husband s sad look when I failed to feed
            Message 5 of 5 , May 3, 2009
              It was a most interesting auction. Too bad I missed a lot because it took place at dinnertime and I couldn't bear my husband's sad look when I failed to feed him promptly! :D




              --- In mosbysrangers@yahoogroups.com, Jessica James <writefromthepast@...> wrote:
              >
              > Yes, that was one of them - got me close enough. THANKS!
              >  
              > Look at this one!
              >  
              > Green heavy Civil war ear cape, attributed to having been worn by James F. ''Big Yankee'' Ames when he was mortally wounded. Missing lower button. Green with wide brown collar.
              > Estimate : $400 - $800  
              >
              > --- On Sat, 4/11/09, Valerie Protopapas <vaproto@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > From: Valerie Protopapas <vaproto@...>
              > Subject: Re: [mosbysrangers] Re: A Most Unusual Note
              > To: mosbysrangers@yahoogroups.com
              > Date: Saturday, April 11, 2009, 9:13 PM
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > I think that the link â€" or ONE of the links â€" is
              >
              > http://www.artfact com/auction- catalog/confeder ate-civil- war-auction- 9ehkquoxy9
              >
              > That’s what I was given.
              >
              > Val
              >
              >
              > On 4/11/09 7:54 PM, "writefromthepast" <writefromthepast@ yahoo.com> wrote:
              >  
              >
              >
              > Very interesting! Thanks for posting. Where is the auction?
              >
              > --- In mosbysrangers@ yahoogroups. com <mailto:mosbysranger s%40yahoogroups.. com> , "richmondtiggergray" <vaproto@> wrote:
              > >
              > > An auction of some Mosby articles is being held in Virginia. Among the items is a very strange note from Mosby to his wife written several days after his most serious wound on December 21st, 1864. The note is not dated but says simply:
              > >
              > >        Pauline
              > >
              > >          I am Wounded and suffering - "Waveland"
              > >
              > >                                 Jno
              > >
              > > Waveland was the home of Eleanor Selden Washington, widow of John Augustine Washington, great-nephew of George Washington. According to surgeon, Aristides Monteiro, Mosby enjoyed visiting the "lovely and lively young ladies" of "Waveland". However, Mosby did not remain at that place. After a long and difficult journey, he made a stop at "Wheatland", the two-story, clapboard home of Marshall Lake, a son of Ludwell Lake in whose home Mosby was wounded. Here he remained a day or two because the home was located at the base of Wildcat Mountain, a rugged, wild area where Mosby could be easily hidden if the Yankees came 'a calling.  He was then smuggled to Culpeper Courthouse and eventually to safety at his parents' home near McIvor's Station. It took a little more than a week to move Mosby from Lake's home where he was wounded to McIvor Station during which he was hunted furiously by Union forces in the area for the entire journey.
              > >
              > > Mosby's note to Pauline is difficult to understand except only in the context of the seriousness of his wound and the agonies he suffered being moved almost constantly since the bullet had been removed on the morning of the 22nd at Quilly Glasscock's home where he was taken immediately after the Union marauders departed the scene. It isn't dated though we know approximately when he was in Washington's home. Most important is the fact that he included the NAME of the place which was dangerous not only for himself (if it had fallen into the wrong hands) but for those with whom he stayed. If it had been intercepted, the Washington's home would surely have been burned even if Mosby had already departed.
              > >
              > > Furthermore, there was no reason to give Pauline that information since he was not going to remain there for any length of time nor did he want her to come to him. As well, most of Mosby's communications with his wife were intended to reassure her when he found himself in difficulties. When he was arrested after the war (and at least once according to an expert, arrangements were underway to actually bring him to trial), he told her "do not be uneasy". Certainly, this note was no attempt at reassurance. Yes, he was alive, but the unusual report of his "suffering" could hardly have been reassuring to his family. It may be that he thought he would die or be captured and THEN die and was attempting to soften the blow. We will obviously never know. But it is certainly a most unusual communication.
              > >
              > > Altogether, it is a most unusual communication but there appears to be little doubt that the note, like the signature, is genuine. But as it makes a pretty puzzle for Mosby aficionados, I thought that the members might enjoy knowing of it.
              > >
              >
              >   
              >     
              >
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