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John Mosby's Amnesty Oath

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  • richmondtiggergray
    Not too long ago, the original oath taken and signed by John Mosby was offered for auction with the following description: Confederate Personages, Col. John
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 5, 2009
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      Not too long ago, the original oath taken and signed by John Mosby was
      offered for auction with the following description:

      Confederate Personages, Col. John Singleton Mosby.

      His signature on this document ended his remarkable military career as
      the fabled Confederate "Gray Ghost". 4" X 73⁄4", printed form filled
      out in ink script.

      Excellent sound condition with some very old paper reinforcements to
      the folds on the back, bright and crisp. An old pencil notation at the
      top, "John S. Mosby Guerilla Chief of Va. 1862 3 & 4" Filled out in
      ink with "No. 175 (Sub-District of) Fauquir (sic) (Va. ) July 26th
      (1865) John S. Mosby" probably by A. H. Russell the Provost. Entirely
      in Mosby's hand, however, is his accession to the oath, "26th, July,
      Age 31, Ocupation (sic) Lawyer, Residence Fauquire (sic) and his
      signature" Jno S. Mosby" tied together without the pen leaving the page.

      The document is countersigned by "A. H. Russell Capt. & Acting Provost
      Marshal." Russell's archive, as a member of the 19th Wisconsin Inf. is
      listed elsewhere in this catalog. Included with this document,
      however, is the original 71⁄2' X 10" manuscript order dated "July 23d
      1863" "Hd Qrs Sub District of Fauquier Warrenton, Va." assigning
      Russell to the position of acting Provost Martial(sic).

      Also included is an 8" X 91⁄2" manuscript letter, undated, from Thomas
      B. Barton of Fredericksburg, Va. to Charles Chilton of Warrenton,
      stating that Russell has "won Golden Opinions from our citizentry by
      his uniform courtesy and gentlemanly conduct " and that he has
      observed Russell's "praiseworthy" department (Provost Marshal) in
      Fredericksburg and "now as they are removing to your locality he goes
      with all the good wishes of our citizens."

      In a letter dated May 27, 1865 Mosby stated "I want to find out what
      will be the course of the Yankees toward me before I return to
      Fauquier).." It is highly likely that the high regard Mosby's fellow
      Virginians held for Russell, led directly to Mosby's formal surrender.
      Simply disbanding his command on April 20 rather than formally
      surrendering, this document was previously unknown, having been held
      by the Russell family since the end of the war and offered here for
      the first time. A great Civil War document of immeasurable historic
      import. Estimate: $20,000 - $25,000.

      TEXT OF THE OATH:

      I John S. Mosby do solemnly swear in the presence of Almighty God that
      I will henceforth faithfully support and defend the Constitution of
      United States and the Union of the States thereunder; and that I will
      in like manner abide by and faithfully support all laws and
      Proclamations which have been made during the existing rebellion with
      reference to the emancipation of slaves – So Help Me God.
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