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Morgan 45 Securing the Anchor Rode

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  • mbswart42
    Our 1995 Catalina Morgan 45 has a 90 ft chain rode with a knot in the bitter end to keep it from going through the windlass. There is nothing in the anchor
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 1, 2013
      Our 1995 Catalina Morgan 45 has a 90 ft chain rode with a knot in the bitter end to keep it from going through the windlass. There is nothing in the anchor locker to secure the chain. Has anyone in this group encountered this with their Morgan and have any of you installed some method of securing the anchor chain to the boat.

      I've never owned a sailboat that had no way of attaching the anchor rode to the boat inside the anchor well. Is this common with Morgans? Our boat has been cruised extensively with the current setup so evidently it hasn't been a problem.
    • Flying Pig
      The reason there s nothing to keep it in the locker is that you don t want to be in the position of having to abandon the anchor and not being able to do so.
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 1, 2013
        The reason there's nothing to keep it in the locker is that  you don't want to be in the position of having to abandon the anchor and not being able to do so.
         
        We have a double locker - one each side, created with a divider.  I put a chunk of closet rod (~1.5" wood) at the end of ~ 2' of a very stout braid-up of mason's line (about 1/4" thick).  I have our chain marked for the last 10 feet so that I'll know when it's coming, both to avoid running it out if I want a GREAT deal of rod out, or, to be able to attach a float if I ever have to abandon it.  I'd run it out to where I could get to the end of the chain (securing the chain with a stopper so I didn't lose it first), put on the buoy, and cut the retainer.  The buoy would show me where to come fetch it.
         
        Back to securing it to the locker, if you had some form of easy-to-release shackling (how easy is it to release any shackle you've seen in a salty environment, where it's been attached for years??), you could put it on a pad eye - but we didn't, for the above reasons...
         
        L8R
         
        Skip
         
        When a man comes to like a sea life, he is not fit to live on land.  
        - Dr. Samuel Johnson
      • Zuzack, Tom
        I can t speak to how common it is in Morgans but the bitter end of my anchor rode is attached to a U bolt. This is the setup I see most commonly though I have
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 1, 2013
          I can't speak to how common it is in Morgans but the bitter end of my anchor rode is attached to a U bolt. This is the setup I see most commonly though I have sometimes seen eye bolts used. 
           
          Tom
          Mia's Competition
          1977 Morgan Out Island 415 Ketch
          Apollo Beach, Florida
           
          On 02/01/13, mbswart42<mbswart42@...> wrote:
           
           

          Our 1995 Catalina Morgan 45 has a 90 ft chain rode with a knot in the bitter end to keep it from going through the windlass. There is nothing in the anchor locker to secure the chain. Has anyone in this group encountered this with their Morgan and have any of you installed some method of securing the anchor chain to the boat.

          I've never owned a sailboat that had no way of attaching the anchor rode to the boat inside the anchor well. Is this common with Morgans? Our boat has been cruised extensively with the current setup so evidently it hasn't been a problem.

        • Home Email
          Yes we ve considered the ditch -ability but how easy would it be to untie the knot currently keeping it from going through the windlass. I guess my concern
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 1, 2013
            Yes we've considered the "ditch" -ability but how easy would it be to untie the knot currently keeping it from going through the windlass.  I guess my concern is that in a storm, how likely is it that we could pull the windless out of the deck if the anchor rode wasn't secured additionally.  I like your wooden dowel as a retainer.  Maybe I could fashion a quick release method of some sort and secure the end to the boat, then use the wooden dowel to ease the load on the quick release by placing it a couple feet up from the end.  Of course marking the chain 10 ft or so out is a good idea.  Thanks!

          • Merlin Clark
            You could get the best of both and have the last bit be a piece of 3 strand nylon cause we know every sailor has a sharp knife on them, right?  
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 1, 2013
              You could get the best of both and have the last bit be a piece of 3 strand nylon 'cause we know every sailor has a sharp knife on them, right?
               

              From: Home Email <mbswart42@...>
              To: morganowners@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Friday, February 1, 2013 7:33 AM
              Subject: Re: [morganowners] Morgan 45 Securing the Anchor Rode
               
              Yes we've considered the "ditch" -ability but how easy would it be to untie the knot currently keeping it from going through the windlass.  I guess my concern is that in a storm, how likely is it that we could pull the windless out of the deck if the anchor rode wasn't secured additionally.  I like your wooden dowel as a retainer.  Maybe I could fashion a quick release method of some sort and secure the end to the boat, then use the wooden dowel to ease the load on the quick release by placing it a couple feet up from the end.  Of course marking the chain 10 ft or so out is a good idea.  Thanks!

            • Ben Okopnik
              ... 100% on the mark. If you re anchored, and - say - a boat on fire is drifting down on you, you want to be able to pitch that rode overboard NOW, and pick it
              Message 6 of 9 , Feb 1, 2013
                On Fri, Feb 01, 2013 at 07:01:06AM -0500, Flying Pig wrote:
                >
                > The reason there's nothing to keep it in the locker is that you don't want to
                > be in the position of having to abandon the anchor and not being able to do so.

                100% on the mark. If you're anchored, and - say - a boat on fire is
                drifting down on you, you want to be able to pitch that rode overboard
                NOW, and pick it up later. Having to run for a knife to cut it, or
                wrestling with frozen shackles, might be just a bit too long.

                I used that ridiculously hyperbolic example of a boat on fire because,
                um, it happened.

                http://okopnik.com/Boat_on_fire/

                "Miss Patty" drifted right by my bow - see first pic in the last panel.
                At that point, though, I was up on my foredeck (I had been on a nearby
                boat when it happened) and had both lines off their cleats and ready to
                drop overboard. It was _very_ nice to know that I could do that.


                There was no time to man the brakes, they knocked the shackle free,
                And the Northern Light stood out again, goose-winged to open sea.
                -- "The Rhyme of the Three Sealers", Rudyard Kipling


                Ben
                --
                No greater care is required upon any works than upon such as are to
                withstand the action of water; for this reason, all parts of the work
                need to be done exactly according to the rules of the art which all
                workmen know, but few observe.
                -- Sextus Julius Frontinus, "De aquaeductu"
              • Ben Okopnik
                ...Also, untangling anchor lines is something that comes up constantly - and you need the end of the rode free to do that. At least, if you want to do it the
                Message 7 of 9 , Feb 1, 2013
                  ...Also, untangling anchor lines is something that comes up constantly -
                  and you need the end of the rode free to do that. At least, if you want
                  to do it the safe, easy way (I've seen people lose a rode overboard
                  while untangling a number of times now, and it always makes me
                  wonder...)


                  Ben
                  --
                  No greater care is required upon any works than upon such as are to
                  withstand the action of water; for this reason, all parts of the work
                  need to be done exactly according to the rules of the art which all
                  workmen know, but few observe.
                  -- Sextus Julius Frontinus, "De aquaeductu"
                • Ben Okopnik
                  ... That trick is easy enough, if you really want to do it. The classic way for a below-decks locker is to drill a couple of pieces of plywood that are narrow
                  Message 8 of 9 , Feb 1, 2013
                    On Fri, Feb 01, 2013 at 07:01:06AM -0500, Flying Pig wrote:
                    >
                    > Back to securing it to the locker, if you had some form of easy-to-release
                    > shackling (how easy is it to release any shackle you've seen in a salty
                    > environment, where it's been attached for years??), you could put it on a pad
                    > eye - but we didn't, for the above reasons...

                    That trick is easy enough, if you really want to do it. The classic way
                    for a below-decks locker is to drill a couple of pieces of plywood that
                    are narrow enough to pass through the chain hawse, but too long to do so
                    - about 2x5" is typical - and to thread them onto the rode end. They'll
                    stop the rode from running out, but slacking it a bit and pulling them
                    up end-first frees the whole thing.

                    For an easy on-deck release, feed a bight of the line through a shackle,
                    and lock it in place with another bight. When needed, just yank the
                    second bight loose.


                    Ben
                    --
                    No greater care is required upon any works than upon such as are to
                    withstand the action of water; for this reason, all parts of the work
                    need to be done exactly according to the rules of the art which all
                    workmen know, but few observe.
                    -- Sextus Julius Frontinus, "De aquaeductu"
                  • Flying Pig
                    That trick is easy enough, if you really want to do it. The classic way for a below-decks locker is to drill a couple of pieces of plywood that are narrow
                    Message 9 of 9 , Feb 1, 2013
                      That trick is easy enough, if you really want to do it. The classic way
                      for a below-decks locker is to drill a couple of pieces of plywood that
                      are narrow enough to pass through the chain hawse, but too long to do so
                      - about 2x5" is typical - and to thread them onto the rode end. They'll
                      stop the rode from running out, but slacking it a bit and pulling them
                      up end-first frees the whole thing.

                      For an easy on-deck release, feed a bight of the line through a shackle,
                      and lock it in place with another bight. When needed, just yank the
                      second bight loose.

                      Ben

                       
                      That's exactly the function of my closet rod - cut out slightly in the center so as to prevent the line from working itself off - stout enough to act as a stopper, but easily wrangled into position to remove through the hawse hole.  Not so with our windlass, due to the drain spout curve, but still cuttable.  And, the purpose of mason's twine is that if we didn't even have time to do that, tying on a fender and tossing it over, and backing smartly would part the line...
                       
                      I've never had to remove my chain while in the water, but I'm ready if needed :{))
                       
                      L8R
                       
                      Skip
                       
                      When a man comes to like a sea life, he is not fit to live on land.  
                      - Dr. Samuel Johnson
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