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Re: [morganowners] Redoing bulkheads

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  • brazos2020@aol.com
    Marv, Also consider 1/4 inch Masonite for making a pattern that is going to be handled a lot. More expensive than free cardboard boxes but much more stable if
    Message 1 of 13 , Jan 1, 2010
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      Marv,
       
      Also consider 1/4 inch Masonite for making a pattern that is going to be handled a lot. More expensive than free cardboard boxes but much more stable if the pattern to be sent of to a fabrication shop such as a mast supports and other metal plates. With stuff that is very shape critical consider making a rough pattern from cardboard and a final working mock up of Masonite.
       
      Charles
       
      In a message dated 12/31/2009 7:49:50 P.M. Central Standard Time, msrm@... writes:
       

      Merlin,
       
      Thank you for your suggestion. Your idea I think is the best and easiest method.
       
      Marv 

       

      Back when, I built the interior of a 32 Travel that I had bought as a hull and deck. For the bulkheads that I needed to make, I cut my patterns out of large card board pieces from refrigerator cartons, with many hours cutting and fitting to fit the mock up to the hull profile.
      Years later I read online about creating the profile by making a one legged compass (stick with pencil taped at right angle on end) and using it to scribe the profile on cardboard by following the outside of the hull. I haven't done this since reading about it, but it sounds like the best approach and if I have the opportunity to make another bulkhead, I'll do it this way.
      The mock up needs to be something stiff like cardboard, foam sheet insulation, etc; otherwise at least one extra set of hands would be necessary.
      Merlin

    • billcreadon@yahoo.com
      I ve been following this thread and thought of a material used in signage called Sintra. It s a PVC white expanded material. At 3mm thk. It s lightweight,
      Message 2 of 13 , Jan 1, 2010
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        I've been following this thread and thought of a material used in signage called Sintra. It's a PVC white expanded material. At 3mm thk. It's lightweight, glueable, paintable and extremely durable. See your local plastics distributor.
        Bill Creadon

        Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry


        From: "msrm" <msrm@...>
        Date: Thu, 31 Dec 2009 20:49:38 -0500
        To: <morganowners@yahoogroups.com>
        Subject: Re: [morganowners] Redoing bulkheads

         

        Merlin,
         
        Thank you for your suggestion. Your idea I think is the best and easiest method.
         
        Marv 

         

        Back when, I built the interior of a 32 Travel that I had bought as a hull and deck. For the bulkheads that I needed to make, I cut my patterns out of large card board pieces from refrigerator cartons, with many hours cutting and fitting to fit the mock up to the hull profile.
        Years later I read online about creating the profile by making a one legged compass (stick with pencil taped at right angle on end) and using it to scribe the profile on cardboard by following the outside of the hull. I haven't done this since reading about it, but it sounds like the best approach and if I have the opportunity to make another bulkhead, I'll do it this way.
        The mock up needs to be something stiff like cardboard, foam sheet insulation, etc; otherwise at least one extra set of hands would be necessary.
        Merlin

      • Merlin Clark
        You re welcome Marv. Please let me know how it comes out. ... From: msrm Subject: Re: [morganowners] Redoing bulkheads To:
        Message 3 of 13 , Jan 1, 2010
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          You're welcome Marv. Please let me know how it comes out.

          --- On Fri, 1/1/10, msrm <msrm@...> wrote:

          From: msrm <msrm@...>
          Subject: Re: [morganowners] Redoing bulkheads
          To: morganowners@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Friday, January 1, 2010, 1:49 AM

           
          Merlin,
           
          Thank you for your suggestion. Your idea I think is the best and easiest method.
           
          Marv 

           
          Back when, I built the interior of a 32 Travel that I had bought as a hull and deck. For the bulkheads that I needed to make, I cut my patterns out of large card board pieces from refrigerator cartons, with many hours cutting and fitting to fit the mock up to the hull profile.
          Years later I read online about creating the profile by making a one legged compass (stick with pencil taped at right angle on end) and using it to scribe the profile on cardboard by following the outside of the hull. I haven't done this since reading about it, but it sounds like the best approach and if I have the opportunity to make another bulkhead, I'll do it this way.
          The mock up needs to be something stiff like cardboard, foam sheet insulation, etc; otherwise at least one extra set of hands would be necessary.
          Merlin


        • horizon421@gmail.com
          Sent via BlackBerry by AT&T ... From: Merlin Clark Date: Fri, 1 Jan 2010 17:42:50 To: Subject: Re:
          Message 4 of 13 , Jan 1, 2010
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            Sent via BlackBerry by AT&T


            From: Merlin Clark <merlinuxo@...>
            Date: Fri, 1 Jan 2010 17:42:50 -0800 (PST)
            To: <morganowners@yahoogroups.com>
            Subject: Re: [morganowners] Redoing bulkheads

             

            You're welcome Marv. Please let me know how it comes out.

            --- On Fri, 1/1/10, msrm <msrm@comcast. net> wrote:

            From: msrm <msrm@comcast. net>
            Subject: Re: [morganowners] Redoing bulkheads
            To: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com
            Date: Friday, January 1, 2010, 1:49 AM

             
            Merlin,
             
            Thank you for your suggestion. Your idea I think is the best and easiest method.
             
            Marv 

             
            Back when, I built the interior of a 32 Travel that I had bought as a hull and deck. For the bulkheads that I needed to make, I cut my patterns out of large card board pieces from refrigerator cartons, with many hours cutting and fitting to fit the mock up to the hull profile.
            Years later I read online about creating the profile by making a one legged compass (stick with pencil taped at right angle on end) and using it to scribe the profile on cardboard by following the outside of the hull. I haven't done this since reading about it, but it sounds like the best approach and if I have the opportunity to make another bulkhead, I'll do it this way.
            The mock up needs to be something stiff like cardboard, foam sheet insulation, etc; otherwise at least one extra set of hands would be necessary.
            Merlin


          • will jones
            Wow, there must be a number of Purdue Univ engineers on this group.  I d like to simplify this a little bit.  Scribing is pretty much a standard practice
            Message 5 of 13 , Jan 6, 2010
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              Wow, there must be a number of Purdue Univ engineers on this group.  I'd like to simplify this a little bit.  Scribing is pretty much a standard practice when installing cabinets.  Just get your kid's compass and sharpen the pencil.  I use a $1.00 compass from the Dollar General Store, since my kids are in college and their compasses are now $900 laptops.  Get some cardboard or poster board.  Cardboard works best though, since it is stiffer.  You can tape multiple pieces together to get the size you need and you can just use a utility knife to cut out any odd shapes you need to account for. 

              Take the utility knife and just cut it to roughly fit against your cabin walls.  You don't have to be precise here.  Should take less than 2 min.  You will get a better result if you have the cardboard touching the cabin wall.  Don't worry about having all of the edges touching, just a few points or edges will be fine.  The only caveat is to make sure that you have cardboard inside or between where the contour line will be and the cabin wall.

              Take the compass, hold it roughly level with the point on the cabin wall and the pencil on the cardboard, and scribe the contour.  Use your utility knife to cut out the contour.  You can use the pencil to transfer your contour to your plywood.  Cut your contour, then cut the plywood to the width you want.

              Don't forget to offset your bulkhead with stryrofoam to avoid squeeking.

              My wife claims I have issues. I agree while looking at her.
              Cyclone 13
              SanJuan 7.7
              Morgan 33T IOR, Hull 24
              Bloomington, IN

              --- On Thu, 12/31/09, marv_marcus <msrm@...> wrote:

              From: marv_marcus <msrm@...>
              Subject: [morganowners] Redoing bulkheads
              To: morganowners@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Thursday, December 31, 2009, 2:47 PM

               

              I have a Morgan 25 with a wet delaminating bulkhead. This is the small one on the starboard side of the galley at the head of the quarter berth. After finding the leak (which I haven't done yet) I would like overlay it with a piece of white Formica sheet.

              I would like some suggestions on how to copy the inside curve of the hull in this area on to the Formica.

              Any suggestions would be appreciated.

              Marv Marcus
              Port Charlotte, FL.


            • USNCas@aol.com
              I used this process and it worked really well. I didn t use poster paper; since I was redoing my entire boat, I bought red rosin paper from Home Depot, it
              Message 6 of 13 , Jan 6, 2010
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                I used this process and it worked really well.
                 
                I didn't use poster paper; since I was redoing my entire boat, I bought "red rosin paper" from Home Depot, it comes in a roll, sold in the section of the store where you'll find roof shingles, or roofing tarpaper.  It was pretty cheap, used the reminder of the roll for many other projects on the boat.
                 
                Dave



                -----Original Message-----
                From: will jones <morgan33t_ior@...>
                To: morganowners@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Wed, Jan 6, 2010 3:58 pm
                Subject: Re: [morganowners] Redoing bulkheads

                 
                Wow, there must be a number of Purdue Univ engineers on this group.  I'd like to simplify this a little bit.  Scribing is pretty much a standard practice when installing cabinets.  Just get your kid's compass and sharpen the pencil.  I use a $1.00 compass from the Dollar General Store, since my kids are in college and their compasses are now $900 laptops.  Get some cardboard or poster board.  Cardboard works best though, since it is stiffer.  You can tape multiple pieces together to get the size you need and you can just use a utility knife to cut out any odd shapes you need to account for. 

                Take the utility knife and just cut it to roughly fit against your cabin walls.  You don't have to be precise here.  Should take less than 2 min.  You will get a better result if you have the cardboard touching the cabin wall.  Don't worry about having all of the edges touching, just a few points or edges will be fine.  The only caveat is to make sure that you have cardboard inside or between where the contour line will be and the cabin wall.

                Take the compass, hold it roughly level with the point on the cabin wall and the pencil on the cardboard, and scribe the contour.  Use your utility knife to cut out the contour.  You can use the pencil to transfer your contour to your plywood.  Cut your contour, then cut the plywood to the width you want.

                Don't forget to offset your bulkhead with stryrofoam to avoid squeeking.

                My wife claims I have issues. I agree while looking at her.
                Cyclone 13
                SanJuan 7.7
                Morgan 33T IOR, Hull 24
                Bloomington, IN

                --- On Thu, 12/31/09, marv_marcus <msrm@comcast. net> wrote:

                From: marv_marcus <msrm@comcast. net>
                Subject: [morganowners] Redoing bulkheads
                To: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com
                Date: Thursday, December 31, 2009, 2:47 PM

                 
                I have a Morgan 25 with a wet delaminating bulkhead. This is the small one on the starboard side of the galley at the head of the quarter berth. After finding the leak (which I haven't done yet) I would like overlay it with a piece of white Formica sheet.

                I would like some suggestions on how to copy the inside curve of the hull in this area on to the Formica.

                Any suggestions would be appreciated.

                Marv Marcus
                Port Charlotte, FL.


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