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RE: [morganowners] Anchors

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  • Alan Pond
    ... I have a pulpit mounted extra anchor which is a bugger to lift, drop and retrieve! However, I have an electric windlass for all other purposes and wouldn t
    Message 1 of 23 , Jun 30, 2008
      --- On Mon, 6/30/08, Bruce <bedesign@...> wrote:

      >While on the topic of anchors, I drop a hook in Long Island Sound
      >and my Danforth has been great, but … after a few years now (getting older)
      >it’s getting difficult to pull the anchor off and on the rail hanger while
      >bent forward.

      I have a pulpit mounted extra anchor which is a bugger to lift, drop and retrieve! However, I have an electric windlass for all other purposes and wouldn't be without it. I heartily recommend it (especially for us older members!)

      Alan P -New Orleans
    • Dimitri Garder
      Hi folks, I realize everyone has their preferences. My main question is really regarding why the difference in cost. The CQR and Manson fetch $600+, the
      Message 2 of 23 , Jul 1, 2008
        Hi folks,
         
        I realize everyone has their preferences.  My main question is really regarding why the difference in cost.  The CQR and Manson fetch $600+, the Lewmar Claw less than $150.  Why so much less for a Lewmar Claw?
         
        This reminds me of another issue I'm facing.  I do have a bow roller with a pin on my new boat, but the pin hasn't been used for years as far as I can tell, and is firmly stuck in the threads of the roller mount.  Trying to twist it with a pair of pliers results only in the pliers end of the pin twisting nearly off the pin, but the pin won't budge.  Any ideas how to get this off?  Are replacements available, assuming I can get this beast off?  No point using the bow roller without the pin.
         
        Thanks,
         
        Dimitri


        From: morganowners@yahoogroups.com [mailto:morganowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of John Howard
        Sent: Monday, June 30, 2008 10:41 PM
        To: morganowners@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

        As we…….. aaaheem ….. some of us age, we need all the mechanical help we can get. I invested in an electric windlass to yank the hook. You should be able to carry a  Danforth in a roller with no problem. Any anchor carried on the bow should have a means of pinning it in the roller in heavy weather, this is just good seamanship. I have used manual windlasses and they are for the younger among us. A 35 foot boat should have fair sized ground tackle. If it is easy for you to set and retrieve your anchor, you will be more inclined to pull and reset a dodgy set rather than convincing yourself that it will “probably” hold.  

        From: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:morganowner s@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Bruce
        Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2008 10:11 AM
        To: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com
        Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

        While on the topic of anchors, I drop a hook in Long Island Sound and my Danforth has been great, but … after a few years now (getting older) it’s getting difficult to pull the anchor off and on the rail hanger while bent forward.

      • Marvin Marcus
        The Delta anchor also made by Lewmar is a more modern anchor and rated as a better anchor then the CQR and cost considerably less. The Claw is a knock off of
        Message 3 of 23 , Jul 1, 2008
          The Delta anchor also made by Lewmar is a more modern anchor and rated as a better anchor then the CQR and cost considerably less. The Claw is a knock off of the Bruce. Being a one piece casting it cost less to make.
           
          Marv
           
           

          Hi folks,
           
          I realize everyone has their preferences.  My main question is really regarding why the difference in cost.  The CQR and Manson fetch $600+, the Lewmar Claw less than $150.  Why so much less for a Lewmar Claw?
           
          This reminds me of another issue I'm facing.  I do have a bow roller with a pin on my new boat, but the pin hasn't been used for years as far as I can tell, and is firmly stuck in the threads of the roller mount.  Trying to twist it with a pair of pliers results only in the pliers end of the pin twisting nearly off the pin, but the pin won't budge.  Any ideas how to get this off?  Are replacements available, assuming I can get this beast off?  No point using the bow roller without the pin.
           
          Thanks,
           
          Dimitri


          From: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:morganowner s@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of John Howard
          Sent: Monday, June 30, 2008 10:41 PM
          To: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com
          Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

          As we…….. aaaheem ….. some of us age, we need all the mechanical help we can get. I invested in an electric windlass to yank the hook. You should be able to carry a  Danforth in a roller with no problem. Any anchor carried on the bow should have a means of pinning it in the roller in heavy weather, this is just good seamanship. I have used manual windlasses and they are for the younger among us. A 35 foot boat should have fair sized ground tackle. If it is easy for you to set and retrieve your anchor, you will be more inclined to pull and reset a dodgy set rather than convincing yourself that it will “probably” hold.  

          From: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:morganowner s@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Bruce
          Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2008 10:11 AM
          To: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com
          Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

          While on the topic of anchors, I drop a hook in Long Island Sound and my Danforth has been great, but … after a few years now (getting older) it’s getting difficult to pull the anchor off and on the rail hanger while bent forward.

        • Gerard Weatherby
          Not sure what pin you re referring to but in general I d try penetrating oil (Liquid Wrench/PB Blaster et. al.) and hammering it out with a drift pin. Or is it
          Message 4 of 23 , Jul 1, 2008

            Not sure what pin you're referring to but in general I'd try penetrating oil (Liquid Wrench/PB Blaster et. al.) and hammering it out with a drift pin.  Or is it something which is threaded? Then penetrating oil and more twisting.

             

            From: Dimitri Garder [mailto:dimitri@...]
            Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2008 9:44 AM
            To: morganowners@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

             

            Hi folks,

             

            I realize everyone has their preferences.  My main question is really regarding why the difference in cost.  The CQR and Manson fetch $600+, the Lewmar Claw less than $150.  Why so much less for a Lewmar Claw?

             

            This reminds me of another issue I'm facing.  I do have a bow roller with a pin on my new boat, but the pin hasn't been used for years as far as I can tell, and is firmly stuck in the threads of the roller mount.  Trying to twist it with a pair of pliers results only in the pliers end of the pin twisting nearly off the pin, but the pin won't budge.  Any ideas how to get this off?  Are replacements available, assuming I can get this beast off?  No point using the bow roller without the pin.

             

            Thanks,

             

            Dimitri

             


            From: morganowners@yahoogroups.com [mailto:morganowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of John Howard
            Sent: Monday, June 30, 2008 10:41 PM
            To: morganowners@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

            As we…….. aaaheem ….. some of us age, we need all the mechanical help we can get. I invested in an electric windlass to yank the hook. You should be able to carry a  Danforth in a roller with no problem. Any anchor carried on the bow should have a means of pinning it in the roller in heavy weather, this is just good seamanship. I have used manual windlasses and they are for the younger among us. A 35 foot boat should have fair sized ground tackle. If it is easy for you to set and retrieve your anchor, you will be more inclined to pull and reset a dodgy set rather than convincing yourself that it will “probably” hold.  

            From: morganowners@yahoogroups.com [mailto:morganowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bruce
            Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2008 10:11 AM
            To: morganowners@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

            While on the topic of anchors, I drop a hook in Long Island Sound and my Danforth has been great, but … after a few years now (getting older) it’s getting difficult to pull the anchor off and on the rail hanger while bent forward.

          • Dimitri Garder
            Hi Gerard, It s the pin at the forward-most end of the bow roller assembly. I think it s used to secure the anchor when it s on the roller. It s threaded,
            Message 5 of 23 , Jul 1, 2008
              Hi Gerard,
               
              It's the pin at the forward-most end of the bow roller assembly.  I think it's used to secure the anchor when it's on the roller.  It's threaded, and only one end is exposed (the end that one uses to unscrew the pin from the thread), so no banging.  Problem with twisting is the exposed end of the pin is coming off, so twisting the "handle" of the pin is not possible.  I can access the shank of the pin itself.  Think a set of vice grips dug into the shank could get that beast off?
               
              Dimitri

              From: morganowners@yahoogroups.com [mailto:morganowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Gerard Weatherby
              Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2008 12:03 PM
              To: morganowners@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

              Not sure what pin you're referring to but in general I'd try penetrating oil (Liquid Wrench/PB Blaster et. al.) and hammering it out with a drift pin.  Or is it something which is threaded? Then penetrating oil and more twisting.

              From: Dimitri Garder [mailto:dimitri@ globalz.com]
              Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2008 9:44 AM
              To: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com
              Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

              Hi folks,

              I realize everyone has their preferences.  My main question is really regarding why the difference in cost.  The CQR and Manson fetch $600+, the Lewmar Claw less than $150.  Why so much less for a Lewmar Claw?

              This reminds me of another issue I'm facing.  I do have a bow roller with a pin on my new boat, but the pin hasn't been used for years as far as I can tell, and is firmly stuck in the threads of the roller mount.  Trying to twist it with a pair of pliers results only in the pliers end of the pin twisting nearly off the pin, but the pin won't budge.  Any ideas how to get this off?  Are replacements available, assuming I can get this beast off?  No point using the bow roller without the pin.

              Thanks,

              Dimitri


              From: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:morganowner s@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of John Howard
              Sent: Monday, June 30, 2008 10:41 PM
              To: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com
              Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

              As we…….. aaaheem ….. some of us age, we need all the mechanical help we can get. I invested in an electric windlass to yank the hook. You should be able to carry a  Danforth in a roller with no problem. Any anchor carried on the bow should have a means of pinning it in the roller in heavy weather, this is just good seamanship. I have used manual windlasses and they are for the younger among us. A 35 foot boat should have fair sized ground tackle. If it is easy for you to set and retrieve your anchor, you will be more inclined to pull and reset a dodgy set rather than convincing yourself that it will “probably” hold.  

              From: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:morganowner s@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Bruce
              Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2008 10:11 AM
              To: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com
              Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

              While on the topic of anchors, I drop a hook in Long Island Sound and my Danforth has been great, but … after a few years now (getting older) it’s getting difficult to pull the anchor off and on the rail hanger while bent forward.

            • Merlin Clark
              I d do as Gerard says and soak it down with a good penetrating oil. I like to repeat the soaking a few times over the course of a couple days and then try to
              Message 6 of 23 , Jul 1, 2008

                I'd do as Gerard says and soak it down with a good penetrating oil. I like to repeat the soaking a few times over the course of a couple days and then try to bust the nut/bolt/whatever loose.

                If it snaps off, drill it out and rethread for a larger pin or leave it smooth and use a quick release pin. Either way, I'd put a s/s wire lanyard on the pin.

                Merlin

                --- On Tue, 7/1/08, Dimitri Garder <dimitri@...> wrote:

                From: Dimitri Garder <dimitri@...>
                Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors
                To: "morganowners@yahoogroups.com" <morganowners@yahoogroups.com>
                Date: Tuesday, July 1, 2008, 5:11 PM

                Hi Gerard,
                 
                It's the pin at the forward-most end of the bow roller assembly.  I think it's used to secure the anchor when it's on the roller.  It's threaded, and only one end is exposed (the end that one uses to unscrew the pin from the thread), so no banging.  Problem with twisting is the exposed end of the pin is coming off, so twisting the "handle" of the pin is not possible.  I can access the shank of the pin itself.  Think a set of vice grips dug into the shank could get that beast off?
                 
                Dimitri

                From: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:morganowner s@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Gerard Weatherby
                Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2008 12:03 PM
                To: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com
                Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

                Not sure what pin you're referring to but in general I'd try penetrating oil (Liquid Wrench/PB Blaster et. al.) and hammering it out with a drift pin.  Or is it something which is threaded? Then penetrating oil and more twisting.

                From: Dimitri Garder [mailto:dimitri@ globalz.com]
                Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2008 9:44 AM
                To: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com
                Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

                Hi folks,

                I realize everyone has their preferences.  My main question is really regarding why the difference in cost.  The CQR and Manson fetch $600+, the Lewmar Claw less than $150.  Why so much less for a Lewmar Claw?

                This reminds me of another issue I'm facing.  I do have a bow roller with a pin on my new boat, but the pin hasn't been used for years as far as I can tell, and is firmly stuck in the threads of the roller mount.  Trying to twist it with a pair of pliers results only in the pliers end of the pin twisting nearly off the pin, but the pin won't budge.  Any ideas how to get this off?  Are replacements available, assuming I can get this beast off?  No point using the bow roller without the pin.

                Thanks,

                Dimitri


                From: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:morganowner s@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of John Howard
                Sent: Monday, June 30, 2008 10:41 PM
                To: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com
                Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

                As we…….. aaaheem ….. some of us age, we need all the mechanical help we can get. I invested in an electric windlass to yank the hook. You should be able to carry a  Danforth in a roller with no problem. Any anchor carried on the bow should have a means of pinning it in the roller in heavy weather, this is just good seamanship. I have used manual windlasses and they are for the younger among us. A 35 foot boat should have fair sized ground tackle. If it is easy for you to set and retrieve your anchor, you will be more inclined to pull and reset a dodgy set rather than convincing yourself that it will “probably” hold.  

                From: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:morganowner s@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Bruce
                Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2008 10:11 AM
                To: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com
                Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

                While on the topic of anchors, I drop a hook in Long Island Sound and my Danforth has been great, but … after a few years now (getting older) it’s getting difficult to pull the anchor off and on the rail hanger while bent forward.


              • Jim Golding
                Along with the penetrating oil, the Vise Grips are the next thing I d pull out of the tool bag. ... Hi Gerard, It s the pin at the forward-most end of the bow
                Message 7 of 23 , Jul 1, 2008
                  Along with the penetrating oil, the Vise Grips are the next thing I'd pull out of the tool bag.
                   
                  -------------- Original message from "Dimitri Garder" <dimitri@...>: --------------

                  Hi Gerard,
                   
                  It's the pin at the forward-most end of the bow roller assembly.  I think it's used to secure the anchor when it's on the roller.  It's threaded, and only one end is exposed (the end that one uses to unscrew the pin from the thread), so no banging.  Problem with twisting is the exposed end of the pin is coming off, so twisting the "handle" of the pin is not possible.  I can access the shank of the pin itself.  Think a set of vice grips dug into the shank could get that beast off?
                   
                  Dimitri

                  From: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:morganowner s@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Gerard Weatherby
                  Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2008 12:03 PM
                  To: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com
                  Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

                  Not sure what pin you're referring to but in general I'd try penetrating oil (Liquid Wrench/PB Blaster et. al.) and hammering it out with a drift pin.  Or is it something which is threaded? Then penetrating oil and more twisting.

                  From: Dimitri Garder [mailto:dimitri@ globalz.com]
                  Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2008 9:44 AM
                  To: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com
                  Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

                  Hi folks,

                  I realize everyone has their preferences.  My main question is really regarding why the difference in cost.  The CQR and Manson fetch $600+, the Lewmar Claw less than $150.  Why so much less for a Lewmar Claw?

                  This reminds me of another issue I'm facing.  I do have a bow roller with a pin on my new boat, but the pin hasn't been used for years as far as I can tell, and is firmly stuck in the threads of the roller mount.  Trying to twist it with a pair of pliers results only in the pliers end of the pin twisting nearly off the pin, but the pin won't budge.  Any ideas how to get this off?  Are replacements available, assuming I can get this beast off?  No point using the bow roller without the pin.

                  Thanks,

                  Dimitri


                  From: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:morganowner s@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of John Howard
                  Sent: Monday, June 30, 2008 10:41 PM
                  To: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com
                  Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

                  As we…….. aaaheem ….. some of us age, we need all the mechanical help we can get. I invested in an electric windlass to yank the hook. You should be able to carry a  Danforth in a roller with no problem. Any anchor carried on the bow should have a means of pinning it in the roller in heavy weather, this is just good seamanship. I have used manual windlasses and they are for the younger among us. A 35 foot boat should have fair sized ground tackle. If it is easy for you to set and retrieve your anchor, you will be more inclined to pull and reset a dodgy set rather than convincing yourself that it will “probably” hold.  

                  From: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:morganowner s@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Bruce
                  Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2008 10:11 AM
                  To: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com
                  Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

                  While on the topic of anchors, I drop a hook in Long Island Sound and my Danforth has been great, but … after a few years now (getting older) it’s getting difficult to pull the anchor off and on the rail hanger while bent forward.

                • John Howard
                  Your question is mainly a name brand name and clone one. CQR has such a following that the company that has the trademark rights to the CQR brand feels they
                  Message 8 of 23 , Jul 1, 2008

                    Your question is mainly a name brand name and clone one. CQR has such a following that the company that has the trademark rights to the CQR brand feels they can sell them for any asking price. They may be better quality, but with the trend of things now days, I would not be surprised if both the expensive one and the cheap one were turned out on the same assembly line in China. Making an anchor in a design that has been around for decades does not warrant selling it for $600.00+  unless you can get some of P.T.  Barnum’s children to buy it.  The Bruce claw is even cheaper to manufacture, it has no moving parts, hence the large number of knock offs.  I have a CQR copy that spent several years on the bottom of the bay as part of a mooring, it was buried so well it had to be pulled up for me by an ocean going tug. I sent it off to be galvanized and it is good as new…….. anybody bought a pair of $175.00 Nike “tennis” shoes lately?

                     

                     

                     

                     

                     

                    From: morganowners@yahoogroups.com [mailto:morganowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dimitri Garder
                    Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2008 10:44 PM
                    To: morganowners@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

                     

                    Hi folks,

                     

                    I realize everyone has their preferences.  My main question is really regarding why the difference in cost.  The CQR and Manson fetch $600+, the Lewmar Claw less than $150.  Why so much less for a Lewmar Claw?

                     

                    This reminds me of another issue I'm facing.  I do have a bow roller with a pin on my new boat, but the pin hasn't been used for years as far as I can tell, and is firmly stuck in the threads of the roller mount.  Trying to twist it with a pair of pliers results only in the pliers end of the pin twisting nearly off the pin, but the pin won't budge.  Any ideas how to get this off?  Are replacements available, assuming I can get this beast off?  No point using the bow roller without the pin.

                     

                    Thanks,

                     

                    Dimitri

                     


                    From: morganowners@yahoogroups.com [mailto:morganowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of John Howard
                    Sent: Monday, June 30, 2008 10:41 PM
                    To: morganowners@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

                    As we…….. aaaheem ….. some of us age, we need all the mechanical help we can get. I invested in an electric windlass to yank the hook. You should be able to carry a  Danforth in a roller with no problem. Any anchor carried on the bow should have a means of pinning it in the roller in heavy weather, this is just good seamanship. I have used manual windlasses and they are for the younger among us. A 35 foot boat should have fair sized ground tackle. If it is easy for you to set and retrieve your anchor, you will be more inclined to pull and reset a dodgy set rather than convincing yourself that it will “probably” hold.  

                    From: morganowners@yahoogroups.com [mailto:morganowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bruce
                    Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2008 10:11 AM
                    To: morganowners@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

                    While on the topic of anchors, I drop a hook in Long Island Sound and my Danforth has been great, but … after a few years now (getting older) it’s getting difficult to pull the anchor off and on the rail hanger while bent forward.

                  • John Howard
                    Consider drilling it out and using a quick release pin... Trying to screw a pin out of a bow roller when you need the anchor NOW is not a thing you want to do.
                    Message 9 of 23 , Jul 1, 2008

                      Consider drilling it out and using a quick release pin……. Trying to screw a pin out of a bow roller when you need the anchor NOW is not a thing you want to do.

                       

                      From: morganowners@yahoogroups.com [mailto:morganowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Merlin Clark
                      Sent: Wednesday, July 02, 2008 5:07 AM
                      To: morganowners@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

                       

                      I'd do as Gerard says and soak it down with a good penetrating oil. I like to repeat the soaking a few times over the course of a couple days and then try to bust the nut/bolt/whatever loose.

                      If it snaps off, drill it out and rethread for a larger pin or leave it smooth and use a quick release pin. Either way, I'd put a s/s wire lanyard on the pin.

                      Merlin

                      --- On Tue, 7/1/08, Dimitri Garder <dimitri@...> wrote:

                      From: Dimitri Garder <dimitri@...>
                      Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors
                      To: "morganowners@yahoogroups.com" <morganowners@yahoogroups.com>
                      Date: Tuesday, July 1, 2008, 5:11 PM

                      Hi Gerard,

                       

                      It's the pin at the forward-most end of the bow roller assembly.  I think it's used to secure the anchor when it's on the roller.  It's threaded, and only one end is exposed (the end that one uses to unscrew the pin from the thread), so no banging.  Problem with twisting is the exposed end of the pin is coming off, so twisting the "handle" of the pin is not possible.  I can access the shank of the pin itself.  Think a set of vice grips dug into the shank could get that beast off?

                       

                      Dimitri


                      From: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:morganowner s@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Gerard Weatherby
                      Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2008 12:03 PM
                      To: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com
                      Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

                      Not sure what pin you're referring to but in general I'd try penetrating oil (Liquid Wrench/PB Blaster et. al.) and hammering it out with a drift pin.  Or is it something which is threaded? Then penetrating oil and more twisting.

                      From: Dimitri Garder [mailto:dimitri@ globalz.com]
                      Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2008 9:44 AM
                      To: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com
                      Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

                      Hi folks,

                      I realize everyone has their preferences.  My main question is really regarding why the difference in cost.  The CQR and Manson fetch $600+, the Lewmar Claw less than $150.  Why so much less for a Lewmar Claw?

                      This reminds me of another issue I'm facing.  I do have a bow roller with a pin on my new boat, but the pin hasn't been used for years as far as I can tell, and is firmly stuck in the threads of the roller mount.  Trying to twist it with a pair of pliers results only in the pliers end of the pin twisting nearly off the pin, but the pin won't budge.  Any ideas how to get this off?  Are replacements available, assuming I can get this beast off?  No point using the bow roller without the pin.

                      Thanks,

                      Dimitri


                      From: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:morganowner s@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of John Howard
                      Sent: Monday, June 30, 2008 10:41 PM
                      To: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com
                      Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

                      As we…….. aaaheem ….. some of us age, we need all the mechanical help we can get. I invested in an electric windlass to yank the hook. You should be able to carry a  Danforth in a roller with no problem. Any anchor carried on the bow should have a means of pinning it in the roller in heavy weather, this is just good seamanship. I have used manual windlasses and they are for the younger among us. A 35 foot boat should have fair sized ground tackle. If it is easy for you to set and retrieve your anchor, you will be more inclined to pull and reset a dodgy set rather than convincing yourself that it will “probably” hold.  

                      From: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:morganowner s@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Bruce
                      Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2008 10:11 AM
                      To: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com
                      Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

                      While on the topic of anchors, I drop a hook in Long Island Sound and my Danforth has been great, but … after a few years now (getting older) it’s getting difficult to pull the anchor off and on the rail hanger while bent forward.

                       

                    • Zuzack, Tom
                      Dimitri, Use penetrating oil such as PB Blaster. Apply several times over a period of time and tap the pin several times to help the oil penetrate. Then use
                      Message 10 of 23 , Jul 1, 2008

                        Dimitri,

                         

                        Use penetrating oil such as PB Blaster.  Apply several times over a period of time and tap the pin several times to help the oil penetrate.  Then use vise grips on the shank to turn the pin.  If no go try applying heat to the frame and ice to the pin.  Try the vise grips again.  If that doesn’t work you may want to try to drill through the pin diameter to allow another pin to go through and give you some grip on the pin.  Try the vise grips again.    If still a no go try drilling the center of the pin and using an easy out.  If still a no go then drill out the entire pin.  Once you get the pin out you may want to use a quick release pin in its place.

                         

                        Tom

                        Mia's Competition

                        1977 Morgan Out Island 415 Ketch

                        Apollo Beach, Florida

                         

                         


                        From: morganowners@yahoogroups.com [mailto:morganowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dimitri Garder
                        Sent: Tuesday, 01 July 2008 12:12 Tom Zuzack
                        To: morganowners@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

                         

                        Hi Gerard,

                         

                        It's the pin at the forward-most end of the bow roller assembly.  I think it's used to secure the anchor when it's on the roller.  It's threaded, and only one end is exposed (the end that one uses to unscrew the pin from the thread), so no banging.  Problem with twisting is the exposed end of the pin is coming off, so twisting the "handle" of the pin is not possible.  I can access the shank of the pin itself.  Think a set of vice grips dug into the shank could get that beast off?

                         

                        Dimitri


                        From: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:morganowner s@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Gerard Weatherby
                        Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2008 12:03 PM
                        To: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com
                        Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

                        Not sure what pin you're referring to but in general I'd try penetrating oil (Liquid Wrench/PB Blaster et. al.) and hammering it out with a drift pin.  Or is it something which is threaded? Then penetrating oil and more twisting.

                        From: Dimitri Garder [mailto:dimitri@ globalz.com]
                        Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2008 9:44 AM
                        To: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com
                        Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

                        Hi folks,

                        I realize everyone has their preferences.  My main question is really regarding why the difference in cost.  The CQR and Manson fetch $600+, the Lewmar Claw less than $150.  Why so much less for a Lewmar Claw?

                        This reminds me of another issue I'm facing.  I do have a bow roller with a pin on my new boat, but the pin hasn't been used for years as far as I can tell, and is firmly stuck in the threads of the roller mount.  Trying to twist it with a pair of pliers results only in the pliers end of the pin twisting nearly off the pin, but the pin won't budge.  Any ideas how to get this off?  Are replacements available, assuming I can get this beast off?  No point using the bow roller without the pin.

                        Thanks,

                        Dimitri

                        size=2 width="100%" align=center>

                        From: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:morganowner s@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of John Howard
                        Sent: Monday, June 30, 2008 10:41 PM
                        To: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com
                        Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

                        As we…….. aaaheem ….. some of us age, we need all the mechanical help we can get. I invested in an electric windlass to yank the hook. You should be able to carry a  Danforth in a roller with no problem. Any anchor carried on the bow should have a means of pinning it in the roller in heavy weather, this is just good seamanship. I have used manual windlasses and they are for the younger among us. A 35 foot boat should have fair sized ground tackle. If it is easy for you to set and retrieve your anchor, you will be more inclined to pull and reset a dodgy set rather than convincing yourself that it will “probably” hold.  

                        From: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:morganowner s@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Bruce
                        Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2008 10:11 AM
                        To: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com
                        Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

                        While on the topic of anchors, I drop a hook in Long Island Sound and my Danforth has been great, but … after a few years now (getting older) it’s getting difficult to pull the anchor off and on the rail hanger while bent forward.

                      • bryan
                        Gt. Sale has thin sand and mud on top of hard smooth rock. I hauled a danforth in by hand from a long scope . 35lb cqr held a 30 boat through sheer weight of
                        Message 11 of 23 , Jul 4, 2008
                          Gt. Sale has thin sand and mud on top of hard smooth rock. I hauled a danforth in by hand from a long scope . 35lb cqr held a 30' boat through sheer weight of chain I think. It _was_ blowing.

                          Bryan


                          --- On Mon, 6/30/08, Jim Golding <j_goldin@...> wrote:

                          > From: Jim Golding <j_goldin@...>
                          > Subject: Re: [morganowners] Anchors
                          > To: morganowners@yahoogroups.com
                          > Date: Monday, June 30, 2008, 5:27 PM
                          > Great Sale is the only place our 25lb CQR went a-dragging
                          > (on an M-323 about 11k lbs). Haven't been back since we
                          > got the Spade anchor. ;)
                          >
                          >
                          > -------------- Original message from bryan
                          > <captbryan2@...>: -------------- Good
                          > anchorages are easy, it's the lousy anchorages that
                          > count. Anyone been in Great Sale Cay in a gale lately ?
                          >
                          > Bryan
                          >
                          > --- On Mon, 6/30/08, jregar@... <jregar@...>
                          > wrote:
                          >
                          > From: jregar@... <jregar@...>
                          > Subject: Re: [morganowners] Anchors
                          > To: morganowners@yahoogroups.com
                          > Date: Monday, June 30, 2008, 2:26 PM
                          >
                          >
                          > I have a 66 lb. MANTA (Bruce type) on my 41 O.I. and it
                          > hasn't broken out of a good anchorage, yet.
                        • Sunstrider@aol.com
                          We used a 40# CQR at Great Sale Cay on our 41 OI last spring. NP. Carl Sunstider Wilmington, NC In a message dated 7/1/2008 9:50:38 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                          Message 12 of 23 , Jul 6, 2008
                            We used a 40# CQR at Great Sale Cay on our 41 OI last spring. NP.
                             
                            Carl
                             
                            Sunstider
                            Wilmington, NC
                             
                            In a message dated 7/1/2008 9:50:38 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, dimitri@... writes:

                            Hi folks,
                             
                            I realize everyone has their preferences.  My main question is really regarding why the difference in cost.  The CQR and Manson fetch $600+, the Lewmar Claw less than $150.  Why so much less for a Lewmar Claw?
                             
                            This reminds me of another issue I'm facing.  I do have a bow roller with a pin on my new boat, but the pin hasn't been used for years as far as I can tell, and is firmly stuck in the threads of the roller mount.  Trying to twist it with a pair of pliers results only in the pliers end of the pin twisting nearly off the pin, but the pin won't budge.  Any ideas how to get this off?  Are replacements available, assuming I can get this beast off?  No point using the bow roller without the pin.
                             
                            Thanks,
                             
                            Dimitri


                            From: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:morganowner s@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of John Howard
                            Sent: Monday, June 30, 2008 10:41 PM
                            To: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com
                            Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

                            As we…….. aaaheem ….. some of us age, we need all the mechanical help we can get. I invested in an electric windlass to yank the hook. You should be able to carry a  Danforth in a roller with no problem. Any anchor carried on the bow should have a means of pinning it in the roller in heavy weather, this is just good seamanship. I have used manual windlasses and they are for the younger among us. A 35 foot boat should have fair sized ground tackle. If it is easy for you to set and retrieve your anchor, you will be more inclined to pull and reset a dodgy set rather than convincing yourself that it will “probably” hold.  

                            From: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:morganowner s@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Bruce
                            Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2008 10:11 AM
                            To: morganowners@ yahoogroups. com
                            Subject: RE: [morganowners] Anchors

                            While on the topic of anchors, I drop a hook in Long Island Sound and my Danforth has been great, but … after a few years now (getting older) it’s getting difficult to pull the anchor off and on the rail hanger while bent forward.





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