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Re: kiwifruit and DNA damage prevention

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  • Ólafur Páll Ólafsson
    ... wrote: ... cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=15225583 ...
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 10, 2005
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      --- In morelife@yahoogroups.com, Ólafur Páll Ólafsson
      <olafurpall@y...> wrote:

      <snip by Ólafur>

      >>> I also found this recent review abstract on DNA damage and various
      >>> nutrients. The full text is an interesting read.
      >>>
      >>> Moller P, Loft S.
      >>> Interventions with antioxidants and nutrients in relation to
      >>> oxidative DNA damage and repair.
      >>> Mutat Res. 2004 Jul 13;551(1-2):79-89. Review.
      >>> http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?
      cmd==Retrieve&db==pubmed&dopt=«stract&list_uids=225583
      >>>
      >>> [The full text of this is not available online, AFAIK. If you have
      >>> the .pdf and send it to me I will make it available in the
      >>> references section of MoreLife. --Paul]
      >>
      >> Are you sure you didn't make some mistake. If I click on the link
      >> above then click on the full text article link on pubmed I get
      >> access to the full text.
      >>
      >> [I have no idea how you are getting it for free. It is an Elsevier
      >> Science publication and they are *never* free. Even a single page
      >> costs US$30 to see it. --Paul]
      >
      > Its better than that, according to my previous experience I get all
      > full text articles that carry that same "Elsevier Science" logo as
      > the abstract above has for free, and always have as far as I
      > remember. I had no idea that I was the only one getting access to
      > them for free. This explains this recent conversation I had on the
      > sci.life-extension group: http://groups-beta.google.com/group/sci.life-
      extension/browse_frm/thread/82a02812cab27596/24e1150a01be58c1?
      q==olafurpall&_done==%2Fgroup%2Fsci.life-extension%2Fsearch%3Fgroup%
      3Dsci.life-extension%26q%3Dolafurpall%26qt_g%3D1%26searchnow%
      3DSearch+this+group%26&_doneTitle=ºck+to+Search&&d#24e1150a01be58c1
      >
      > [Yes, I remember that conversation and could never understand it.
      You are indeed fortunate. Many dozens of times I have read an
      abstract from an Elsevier journal and wanted to immediately see the
      full paper (to complete the need when I had the immediate interest),
      only to be thwarted by not having access. And, unfortunately,
      Elsevier has a very large number of highly important journals. It
      would be outrageously expensive to have a subscription to even the
      most important ones, and this would be a waste because I would never
      read whole journals and certainly do not want print copies. The
      situation is most annoying and constantly makes my life difficult. I
      know I could now ask you to send me such papers, but then I would
      only get them later when the urgency has already past and I am now
      busy with other things (and have likely even forgotten exactly what
      I was after). If you are somehow on an Elsevier account, you should
      be able to find out what is your user name and password and then you
      might be able to pass them on (hint, hint :)
      >
      > However, it just occurred to me that you may be accessing
      everything at a university and they have subscriptions to all the
      journals. In such a case, you cannot likely get the username and
      password. But you could try. --Paul]

      I have never purposely registered at Elsevier and when I click on
      the full text article and get access to the full text I see that I
      am given the option to register or login to Elsevier so obviously I
      am not logged in on any account. And no, I am not using a computer
      at a university. I am using the computer at my home and I've also
      tried to gain access to Elsevier articles at other computers where I
      work and I always get access to them. This company I've been
      working at is a phone company and I see no reason to think they have
      subscriptions to any journals. There is one thing I noticed when
      exploring Elsevier. When I've accessed a full text Elsevier article
      I can choose "Abstract Databases" in the menu bar. Then I see a
      listing of various abstract databases such as "BIOSIS
      Previews", "Compendex", "MEDLINE" and others. All the databases
      have a mark in front of them that says either "subscribed","non-
      subscribed" or "complimentary". All the databases are marked as non-
      subscribed except for MEDLINE which is marked as subscribed. And if
      I click on the MEDLINE mark it says "This database is available as
      part of your subscription from 1966 to present." I'm not even
      registered but Elsevier acts as I subscribed to MEDLINE before I was
      even born.

      [All I can think is that the IP address from both those places is within the range assigned to the local university. Likely this has happened by error, but perhaps because of the small size and isolation of Iceland and the small number of IP addresses assigned to it. It may be that all of Iceland has effective full access to Science Direct (which operates the database for all Elsevier journals). --Paul]

      And I understand how frustrated you are not getting
      access to these articles. I myself hate it when I just finished
      reading an interesting abstract and want to check out the full text
      article but it's not available for free or just not available at
      all. I also understand your need to immediately see the full text
      as It is very annoying not to get access to the full text until a
      day or two later instead of right now when you just read several
      abstracts and your mind is on the subject.

      I hereby volunteer to send morelife readers Elsevier full text
      articles by email or by uploading articles to the morelife group
      files section.

      [The Yahoo group space is quite limited, but we can download
      to our website the ones that directly relate to the present
      or future content of the MoreLife website. We currently have
      a subdirectory which contains dozens of .pdf files. They are
      all obtainable from their PMID number with a URL of the form: http://morelife.org/references/full_papers/pmid.pdf - where
      "pmid" is the PMID number of the paper. Most of them also
      have a full citation in the references index at:
      http://morelife.org/references. If any you or others upload
      (or send to Kitty by email attachment) are directly pertinent
      to what is or will be on the MoreLife website, then citations
      for them with links to them will be put into the index (when
      we get to it). --Paul]

      Don't hesitate to contact me for a copy of an
      Elesevier article. I am fortunate to get access to those articles
      and I hope morelife readers will also benefit from my luck.

      <snip by Ólafur>

      > I am particularly referring to the LEF forums where you were a
      > moderator. That is where I first started reading abstracts almost
      > two years ago. First the abstracts looked like Chinese to me but I
      > learned the basics by reading the abstracts and then your
      > interpretations of them. I systematically read all the posts on
      > some of the sub-forums there;-)
      >
      > [It is great to know that my work there continues to be of value.
      > It is only too bad LEF did not value it more at the time. --Paul]

      They probably did not take into account any future value gained from
      your work.

      [Probably not. That is typically how short-sighted people (unfortunately most in current society) operate. The reason why this does not change of course, is that the necessary incentives and disincentives are not built into the framework of current society. In fact, just the opposite holds and it gets worse instead of better every year. The Self-Sovereign Individual Project is my attempt to reverse that trend. --Paul]

      > [And worse now that LEF has removed even the reference to Paul's
      > old handle "Tom Matthews" from all those messages posted prior
      > to January 11, 2002. However, his user profile (as Tom Matthews)
      > with a link to Morelife is still there and there are still
      > references to "Tom" in many of the messages. **Kitty]

      Luckily I finished reading most of the messages before this happened
      when Paul's text was also red which was very convenient.

      [Thanks for reminding me. I have forgotten about that method of making my comments standout separately. BTW, we captured all the original forum messages in their original form before I resigned, because we were concerned that LEF might delete them. --Paul]
    • Riso
      ... sciencedirect does not work as you think. The problems is that you do not accept this fact. [No. The problem is that you present no direct evidence for
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 12, 2005
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        On 04:23 a.m. 10/02/05 +0000, Riso wrote:


        >On 05:54 a.m. 08/02/05 +0000, Ólafur Páll Ólafsson wrote:
        > >If you are somehow on an Elsevier account, you should be able to find out
        > >what is your user name and password and then you might be able to pass
        > >them on (hint, hint :)
        > >
        > >However, it just occurred to me that you may be accessing everything at a
        > >university and they have subscriptions to all the journals. In such a
        > >case, you cannot likely get the username and password. But you could try.
        > >--Paul]
        >
        >As I already explained to Kitty in a personal email, these databases (like
        >sciencedirect.com from which is the mentioned article) work by recognizing
        >the IP. Some have user/pass (for customization mainly, like alerts, search
        >history, citations, etc.) but it is useless unless you are assigned an
        >authorized IP connecting from a university institution or proxy.
        >
        >[All universities also have username/passwords as well. But they would
        >only be available to the authorized agents at the university. If one knew
        >such a username/password, then one would be able to log in and have full
        >access from anywhere. There may be a distinction between databases of
        >journals and direct subscription access to journals at publisher sites.
        >But I really have little interest in discussing this essentially factual
        >topic without clear evidence of how it works.--Paul]

        sciencedirect does not work as you think. The problems is that you do not
        accept this fact.

        [No. The problem is that you present no direct evidence for your statements.
        If you examine a page such as: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=JournalListURL&_type=all&_auth=y&_btn=Y&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=c14e33607937bcf6fccd12835bd668fa
        you will see that there is an icon beside each journal which indicates
        if one has a subscription or other type of access. If I had a subscription
        to several journals, I expect that would be indicated by those icons being
        different when I logged in and I would have full access to those particular
        journals. It may be that universities have some other (IP type) arrangement
        *as well*, but I expect they most certainly would also have this capability
        via some username and password for the journals to which they are subscribed.
        In the past I was given a university username and password for certain
        journals, but those particular journals were not of great interest and
        username/password was later nonfunctional. --Paul]


        >Some journals work with user/pass and no IP, like JAMA, but big ,important
        >databases most often require IP.
        >
        >[Yes, Riso, Paul and I knew what you were saying before and now. **Kitty]

        As you insisted in trying to obtain a user/pass without an IP, which is
        useless, I repeated because I though Paul did not read my message or
        maybe I was not clear.

        [You were clear, but that is not the *only* way things are possible. --Paul]


        "How Do I Access ScienceDirect?

        ScienceDirect is a web based service and it is available to all staff and
        students of Griffith University. Access is IP controlled so access is
        available from any campus workstation and also remotely for PPP/modem
        access or to users authenticated for remote access. ID and password are not
        required. "
        http://www.gu.edu.au/ins/collections/databases/content_sciencedirect_intro.html

        [Riso, you have finally produced some evidence, but this evidence above
        does not prove that access to ScienceDirect is also not possible by means
        of a username/password when *not* operating through a university IP. --Paul]


        The real alternative could be to have an Athens ID, then you could log in
        to sciencedirect with just Athens user/pass

        Athens is an Access Management system for controlling access to web based
        subscription services.
        http://www.athensams.net/

        [So isn't this just like I have been describing? --Paul]


        Another possibility is a proxy used by ru.is [Reykjavik University] or at any place that gives access and that you can connect to. Maybe Ólafur can find one.

        >In many cases an entire university is "logged in". However, stay tuned
        >for Olafur's follow-up message currently in the queue. Then see if you
        >can figure out the "mystery" he describes. **Kitty]

        Yes, it is a mystery! :-)

        The IPs are not in the same range as Paul suggested
        www.ru.is = [ 130.208.240.71 ]

        BTW I wish all educational institutions stick with the .edu address,
        searching them would be much easy, e.g. a Google search with "keyword
        site:.edu" or "keyword inurl:edu", This search would not include ru.is and
        many other major universities.

        I have no explanation for what happens. Maybe iceland is just a great
        country that gives access to all citizens :-). Unfortunatelly this is not
        possible, modest access for a number of institutions cost millions of dollars.

        If Ólafur can create a personal account at sciencedirect he could benefif
        from the features it has and learn how it works. The interface is very nice.

        [I have had a personal login account at ScienceDirect for several years
        and get alerts to several journals. I get tables of contents every time
        each journal is published and can click to read the abstracts. That is
        what makes the lack of full access so frustrating, that I cannot go
        further, without great expense, when additional information is crucial. --Paul]


        Riso

        [After Paul wrote the above, I did a bit of research on my own.

        From what I read at the applicable websites, it appears that there has
        been a failure to communicate because the same terms have not been used.
        A few years ago Elsevier created ScienceDirect from a web database of
        Elsevier's many own journals (later including some other publisher's
        journals through acquisitions). The customers for ScienceDirect are
        institutions whose librarians decide on which journals the institution
        will subscribe to for full article access (dependent on their target
        usage and budget). Individuals who are affiliated with an institution
        can either make use of ScienceDirect by way of the institution's own
        computers or outside the institution (Athen's log-in) if such an
        arrangement has been made between the institution and ScienceDirect.
        Detailed information was not found on what is required by an
        institution-affiliated person to provide to his/her Athen's enabled
        institution for then making use of "outside" computers. A required
        separate log-in and password is however quite clear.

        For an individual with no institution affiliation, he/she can obtain
        access to Elsevier jounal articles by way of subscription to individual
        journals (for example Bioorganic Chemistry US$ 232/yr for 6 issues,
        which also allows for web access), purchase of access to particular
        journal articles ($30 each at last look independent of length), or by
        having them sent by a person with an account via institution affiliation
        or direct subscription. Whether such a person can make use of an Athen's
        account of an institution affiliated individual is not clear.

        I think the subject of ScienceDirect's institutional customers and
        Elsevier's individual journal access has now been covered sufficiently
        and nothing more is to be gained by continuing the discussion. **Kitty]

        [Any more discussion of this is a gross waste of time. The only point that
        I ever wished to make was the restrictions and frustrations of being an
        independent researcher who has to work 10 times as hard to scrape up
        information as do those priveleged people associated with academic and
        corporate institutions.
        I am convinced that in a freer society the market of competition would not
        enshrine such restrictive practices. I fail to see any good reason why it
        would not be of commercial interest to Elsevier to allow personal access to
        all its journals for a fee prorated by number of papers downloaded per year,
        instead of the totally establishment oriented restrictive practices which
        operates more like the prescription power of doctors. --Paul]
      • Ólafur Páll Ólafsson
        ... ...
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 13, 2005
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          --- In morelife@yahoogroups.com, Riso <ajtkrlhf@h...> wrote:

          <snip by Ólafur>

          > [If you examine a page such as:
          http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob==JournalListURL&_type==all&_auth==y&_btn==Y&_acct=À00050221&_version==1&_urlVersion==0&_userid=&md5=Á4e33607937bcf6fccd12835bd668fa
          > you will see that there is an icon beside each journal which indicates
          > if one has a subscription or other type of access. If I had a subscription
          > to several journals, I expect that would be indicated by those icons being
          > different when I logged in and I would have full access to those particular
          > journals. --Paul]

          I want to let morelife readers know that I have access to the
          majority of the science direct journals listed at the link above.
          Most of the journals are marked as "subscribed". If anyone is
          interested in any of those journals they can contact me to check if
          I have access to them. An example of a journal which morelife
          readers might be interested in and I have access to is the "Ageing
          Research Reviews" journal.

          [Thanks for letting us know. The page that I gave above was just the "A"
          journals. I presume you are also subscribed to all the other pages of
          journals as well (all 2133 journals, at last count). Maybe I should move
          to Iceland :-) Seriously, I really think that ScienceDirect has made some
          error here, but let's not tell them. I will start organizing myself so
          that as soon as I read an abstract from the journal contents that are sent
          to me, of which I realy want to read the full paper, then I will send the
          abstract link to you. To make it simpler for you, I will send you a method
          to upload by FTP to our website. --Paul]
        • Ólafur Páll Ólafsson
          ... I just figured out why I have access to these journals. I received the following message in an email from the university of Iceland which I am currently
          Message 4 of 11 , Mar 15, 2005
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            --- In morelife@yahoogroups.com, Ólafur Páll Ólafsson
            <olafurpall@y...> wrote:
            >
            > I want to let morelife readers know that I have access to the
            > majority of the science direct journals listed at the link above.
            > Most of the journals are marked as "subscribed". If anyone is
            > interested in any of those journals they can contact me to check
            > if I have access to them. An example of a journal which morelife
            > readers might be interested in and I have access to is the "Ageing
            > Research Reviews" journal.
            >
            > [Thanks for letting us know. The page that I gave above was just
            > the "A" journals. I presume you are also subscribed to all the
            > other pages of journals as well (all 2133 journals, at last count).
            > Maybe I should move to Iceland :-) Seriously, I really think that
            > ScienceDirect has made some error here, but let's not tell them.
            > I will start organizing myself so that as soon as I read an abstract
            > from the journal contents that are sent to me, of which I realy want
            > to read the full paper, then I will send the abstract link to you.
            > To make it simpler for you, I will send you a method
            > to upload by FTP to our website. --Paul]

            I just figured out why I have access to these journals. I received
            the following message in an email from the university of Iceland
            which I am currently attending:

            "The good people of the University of Iceland have access to over
            8,000 full-text journals and 34 databases on http://hvar.is on any
            Internet-connected computer in the country. Regrettably, an English
            interface has not yet been developed, and Icelandic will remain the
            main interface language. All the same, you can gain direct access by
            clicking the links on the left.

            Additionally, you can gain access on campus to 1,000 full-text
            journals and 85 databases through the University library website,
            http://www.bok.hi.is/english/third.htm , see "Databases" and "E-
            journals".
            This additional access also works for users with Internet access
            through RHÍ or VPN users (Virtual Private Network, for information
            see http://www.rhi.hi.is).

            cheers, Sveinn Ólafsson, Iceland Consortia administrator,
            http://hvar.is"

            At this link http://hvar.is/sida.php?id=& the following is written:

            "hvar.is is the Icelandic countrywide access portal to electronic
            databases and e-journals. Here you find information on and access to
            the 31 databases in nationwide access, more than 8.000 full text
            journals, 350.000 literary works works of English and American
            poetry, drama and prose, 3 reference works and 1 dictionary."

            Apparently every computer in Iceland that has an internet connection
            can access this database. This national access is currently paid
            for by over 200 institutions and companies here in Iceland most of
            which are run by the government, so as a tax payer I am already
            paying for my access. A list of the databases Icelanders have
            access to is found at the above link. In addition to ScienceDirect
            I also have access to Springerlink articles and Blackwell Synergy
            articles, so I can provide full text articles from these
            publications as well. But I am going to reword my offer to provide
            full text articles to people. Providing people with full text
            articles is a service which takes time and I highly value my time
            and would rather like to do something else with it. Therefore I am
            certainly not going to offer this service to [just] anyone.

            From now on my offer to provide full text papers will be restricted
            to persons that fulfil the following requirements:
            1. Have been members of the MoreLife Yahoo group for at least 6
            months.
            2. Have posted at least one message at the MoreLife Yahoo group.

            I will however give exceptions to the above requirements to persons
            that have either given me sufficient value beforehand in one way or
            another or given me a really good reason to be excluded from the
            above requirements.

            [Thanks very much for this most generous offer. And please, anyone
            taking advantage of Olafur's offer, before you ask him for a full
            paper seriously decide that you will read it. --Paul]
          • Kitty Antonik Wakfer
            ... ... ... Olafur s information about how he - and all those with Internet connections in Iceland - are getting access to these databases
            Message 5 of 11 , Mar 16, 2005
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              --- In morelife@yahoogroups.com, Ólafur Páll Ólafsson
              <olafurpall@y...> wrote:
              >
              > --- In morelife@yahoogroups.com, Ólafur Páll Ólafsson
              > <olafurpall@y...> wrote:
              > >
              > > I want to let morelife readers know that I have access to the
              > > majority of the science direct journals listed at the link above.

              <snip>

              > I just figured out why I have access to these journals. I received
              > the following message in an email from the university of Iceland
              > which I am currently attending:
              >
              > "The good people of the University of Iceland have access to over
              > 8,000 full-text journals and 34 databases on http://hvar.is on any
              > Internet-connected computer in the country.

              <snip>

              >
              > Apparently every computer in Iceland that has an internet connection
              > can access this database. This national access is currently paid
              > for by over 200 institutions and companies here in Iceland most of
              > which are run by the government, so as a tax payer I am already
              > paying for my access.

              <snip>

              Olafur's information about how he - and all those with Internet
              connections in Iceland - are getting access to these databases shows
              (just) one way in which socialization of society there has advanced
              far beyond the current level in the US (which is becoming worse each
              year). It appears that those in Iceland who do not have Internet
              access - or even computers at all - are being taxed to support
              the "elite" who do. This same concept of taking/stealing (via taxes)
              from all or certain groups of individuals to distribute to others
              (some even the same) is so prevalent in all countries that for
              possibly most people it has become a background situation they
              accept without conscious thought. Such a "pseudo ponzi scheme" can
              not forever continue, nor can it at the same time support increasing
              science, technology, prosperity, freedoms (possible actions) *and*
              liberty. The easily seen results are increased taxes, more
              restriction of available personal choices, the unavailability of
              choices that would have been created but did not come into existence
              because of the lack of personal spending ability and choice, increased
              regulations on existing choices including limitations of services
              funded by governments (medical related as a big example), and more
              creation by governments of costly distractions away from the massive
              expenditures - quantities of currency that are nearly impossible to
              conceptualize (eg. trillions of $ - a $trillion is roughly $4,000 for
              every man, woman and child in the US!). Where services are provided,
              there is only a one size fits all approach, which you get whether
              you want it or not. When most of one's income is taken in taxes (of
              all forms) to support this equalization approach, a person has
              little chance to make any decision about what goods and services and
              of what quality/specifics he/she wants to buy.

              The basic "wrongness" at the heart of the system (government caused
              lack of individual choice) far too often gets lost in the frequently
              viewed (online and in other media) rantings against the obvious
              results (inefficiency, waste and profiteering). And virtually no
              attention is given by the ranters about how to determine what kind
              of society is really needed for human beings to live to their utmost
              capability and have the utmost personal choice. "Tweaks" to the
              current system are all that are proposed, if any suggested "fix" is
              given at all. I've wondered at times if these hundreds of writers
              of rants/blogs/articles on government actions seek merely to foment
              anger, unrest and adulation for their "give 'em hell" approach in
              their readers. Some even take satisfaction in the fact that they
              make their readers "uneasy", but do not see the need to identify
              anymore than very generally - that government doesn't do things
              right, instead of identifying where the crux of the problem really
              lies - that government doesn't promote individual choice because
              its representational democracy and collective operating methods
              are the antithesis of individual choice. Writers of this type do
              not perform the philosophical work required to truly find either
              the fundamental causes of the problems or the fundamental solution,
              and I often wonder if they truly want to find a solution. If they
              did want a solution, their writings would necessarily have to
              change from being rants to being more reasoned descriptions of
              such a solution.

              Many (maybe most) of the readers of MoreLife Yahoo posts are here
              because they value Paul's ability to get to the heart of and
              logically evaluate research studies related to health and life-
              extension subjects. However, his ability to grasp fundamentals and
              their logical connections, and to make them clear to others does
              not stop with just health and life extension related matters. For
              those who have not read Paul's essays at the Self-Sovereign
              Individual Project and wish to increase their own understanding
              of how human interactions can be greatly improved, I greatly
              recommend that they do so. Paul does not rant - he identifies
              facts and proposes solutions based on those facts - and he is
              open to reasoned discussion about all he writes.
              http://selfsip.org

              Paul also does not write something and consider the matter closed;
              among other efforts, he is currently reviewing again his notations
              to the Natural Social Contract for improvements and modifications
              to certain Contract definitions and clauses themselves. Once readers
              have read and seriously considered the various essays, questions and
              comments here at MoreLife Yahoo are welcome and encouraged. By means
              of such views, comments and questions of serious others, progress can
              be accelerated in moving the NSC from being a "draft" to being a
              document ready for signing.

              **Kitty
              (with some improved rephrasing by Paul)
            • Ólafur Páll Ólafsson
              ... A recent discussion I had with Paul through email prompted me to check out the site http://hvar.is again. After examining the site for a while I figured
              Message 6 of 11 , May 29, 2006
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                --- In morelife@yahoogroups.com, Ólafur Páll Ólafsson <olafurpall@...>
                wrote:
                >
                >
                > --- In morelife@yahoogroups.com, Ólafur Páll Ólafsson
                > <olafurpall@y...> wrote:
                > >
                > > I want to let morelife readers know that I have access to the
                > > majority of the science direct journals listed at the link above.
                > > Most of the journals are marked as "subscribed". If anyone is
                > > interested in any of those journals they can contact me to check
                > > if I have access to them. An example of a journal which morelife
                > > readers might be interested in and I have access to is the "Ageing
                > > Research Reviews" journal.
                > >
                > > [Thanks for letting us know. The page that I gave above was just
                > > the "A" journals. I presume you are also subscribed to all the
                > > other pages of journals as well (all 2133 journals, at last count).
                > > Maybe I should move to Iceland :-) Seriously, I really think that
                > > ScienceDirect has made some error here, but let's not tell them.
                > > I will start organizing myself so that as soon as I read an abstract
                > > from the journal contents that are sent to me, of which I realy want
                > > to read the full paper, then I will send the abstract link to you.
                > > To make it simpler for you, I will send you a method
                > > to upload by FTP to our website. --Paul]
                >
                > I just figured out why I have access to these journals. I received
                > the following message in an email from the university of Iceland
                > which I am currently attending:
                >
                > "The good people of the University of Iceland have access to over
                > 8,000 full-text journals and 34 databases on http://hvar.is on any
                > Internet-connected computer in the country. Regrettably, an English
                > interface has not yet been developed, and Icelandic will remain the
                > main interface language. All the same, you can gain direct access by
                > clicking the links on the left.
                >
                > Additionally, you can gain access on campus to 1,000 full-text
                > journals and 85 databases through the University library website,
                > http://www.bok.hi.is/english/third.htm , see "Databases" and "E-
                > journals".
                > This additional access also works for users with Internet access
                > through RHÍ or VPN users (Virtual Private Network, for information
                > see http://www.rhi.hi.is).
                >
                > cheers, Sveinn Ólafsson, Iceland Consortia administrator,
                > http://hvar.is"
                >
                > At this link http://hvar.is/sida.php?id=& the following is written:
                >
                > "hvar.is is the Icelandic countrywide access portal to electronic
                > databases and e-journals. Here you find information on and access to
                > the 31 databases in nationwide access, more than 8.000 full text
                > journals, 350.000 literary works works of English and American
                > poetry, drama and prose, 3 reference works and 1 dictionary."
                >
                > Apparently every computer in Iceland that has an internet connection
                > can access this database. This national access is currently paid
                > for by over 200 institutions and companies here in Iceland most of
                > which are run by the government, so as a tax payer I am already
                > paying for my access. A list of the databases Icelanders have
                > access to is found at the above link. In addition to ScienceDirect
                > I also have access to Springerlink articles and Blackwell Synergy
                > articles, so I can provide full text articles from these
                > publications as well. But I am going to reword my offer to provide
                > full text articles to people. Providing people with full text
                > articles is a service which takes time and I highly value my time
                > and would rather like to do something else with it. Therefore I am
                > certainly not going to offer this service to [just] anyone.
                >
                > From now on my offer to provide full text papers will be restricted
                > to persons that fulfill the following requirements:
                > 1. Have been members of the MoreLife Yahoo group for at least 6
                > months.
                > 2. Have posted at least one message at the MoreLife Yahoo group.
                >
                > I will however give exceptions to the above requirements to persons
                > that have either given me sufficient value beforehand in one way or
                > another or given me a really good reason to be excluded from the
                > above requirements.
                >
                > [Thanks very much for this most generous offer. And please, anyone
                > taking advantage of Olafur's offer, before you ask him for a full
                > paper, seriously decide that you will read it. --Paul]

                A recent discussion I had with Paul through email prompted me to check
                out the site http://hvar.is again. After examining the site for a
                while I figured out that I have free access to many more journals than
                I previously thought. But as opposed to ScienceDirect, Springerlink
                and Blackwell Synergy which I can access directly through pubmed, as I
                usually do, these journals I can only access through the site
                http://hvar.is. I hereby extend my offer of providing people
                with full text articles to include articles found in these journals,
                given that they fulfill the requirements above. A complete list of
                the journals is found here:
                http://hvar.is/upload/1/Timarit%20Landsadgangs%20April%202006.pdf
                Note that for most of the journals the subscription only covers fairly
                recent issues.

                [Thanks again, Olafur, for your generous offer. Unfortunately, the list does not contain at least two important journals published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. --Paul]
              • Kitty Antonik Wakfer
                The item below was extracted from Olafur s post regarding his blood pressure and placed here where it properly belongs. ... ... I also just
                Message 7 of 11 , Nov 7, 2006
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                  The item below was extracted from Olafur's post regarding his blood
                  pressure and placed here where it properly belongs.

                  --- In morelife@yahoogroups.com, Ólafur Páll Ólafsson <olafurpall@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In morelife@yahoogroups.com, Ólafur Páll Ólafsson
                  > <olafurpall@y...> wrote:
                  >
                  <snip by Kitty>

                  >
                  > I don't think Pomegranate juice is available here in Iceland. At
                  > least I haven't found it in the major stores here. The whole fruit
                  > on the other hand is available here and I'm going to buy some and
                  > see how it tastes. By the way I recently ordered some Pomegranate
                  > extract from NOW foods.

                  I also just switched to a new pomegranate extract. As I've reported on
                  the MoreLife Yahoo group I've been taking a pomegranate extract
                  because the juice is not available here in Iceland. The brand I was
                  previously taking was only standardized to ellagic acid which is
                  likely not the active compound responsible for the potent ACE
                  inhibiting effects of the juice. The extract I'm taking now on the
                  other hand is standardized to several components including
                  Anthocyanins and it is made from the whole fruit. It appears to be
                  very potent. Comparing the anthocyanin content and the ellagic acid
                  content of it (according to the certificate of analysis given for the
                  product on their website) to the anthocyanin and ellagic acid content
                  of a pomegranate juice used successfully in one scientific study, one
                  capsule equals about 200-400ml of juice. I have been taking 1 capsule
                  daily of this extract for a few months now. FYI here is a link to the
                  product I'm talking about (scroll down to see the certificate of
                  analysis): http://brownwoodacres.com/pomegranatesoftgels.htm

                  Ólafur Páll Ólafsson

                  [In a few days, LEF will have available several more products containing pomegranate juice extract. When those are available and their descriptions are online, I will make a comparison with what you currently take, post it here and then order some extract products for myself (likely LEF in any case, since I get them free and they are generally of good quality). --Paul]


                  <snip rest of previous message by Kitty>

                  **Kitty
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