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Re: Justine-agony

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  • gypsyjimmy1
    yes,james(that sounds so victorian) i think you are going to be quite pleased with mr durrell.just slow it down and enjoy the ride. please keep the comments up
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 1, 2002
      yes,james(that sounds so victorian) i think you are going to be quite
      pleased with mr durrell.just slow it down and enjoy the ride. please
      keep the comments up as you progress.
      peace,
      jim








      --- In modernlibrary100greatestbooks@y..., yarrbles <no_reply@y...>
      wrote:
      > --- In modernlibrary100greatestbooks@y..., gypsyjimmy1
      > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      > >
      > > why agonize? just move on while we enjoy the quartet. we can
      > > somehow survive.you won't have the agony and we will have the
      estacy
      > > (if you will).
      > > peace' jim
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > Yes, Jim, you have a point. I would like to read the next in the
      > Quartet since I have recently read that further novels elucidate
      > themes and characters from Justine. I probably spoke too soon. Not
      > sure why I had such a strong reaction. Durrell does have a sensual
      > prose style that is both vivid and abstract at the same time. He is
      > very good at teasing, letting you almost sip from a frosted glass
      on
      > a sweltering day before pulling it away from you. Maybe I should
      just
      > enjoy the tease. Need to give Justine another chance.
      >
      > James
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In modernlibrary100greatestbooks@y..., yarrbles
      <no_reply@y...>
      > > wrote:
      > > > I'm two thirds of the way through and I find the novel
      agonizing.
      > > The
      > > > only interesting character so far is Balcazar, and he's barely
      > > > mentioned. The characters are pompous, tedious, pretentious and
      > > > thoroughly dull. If that is the point, then Durrell has more
      than
      > > > drummed it home. And yes, one should be invested in the
      > > > characters in a novel to keep reading. Otherwise, one should
      > write
      > > > write poetry which Durrell apparently did before he decided to
      > > > write "novels". I'll finish this one (I once pulled my own
      toothe
      > > out
      > > > with a pair of pliers, so the pain should be about the same).
      > God,
      > > I
      > > > hope we don't decide to read all four!
    • kamonkey2001
      Hi all, I m new here and I m about half way through Justine. I also read High Wind in Jamaica but there didn t seem to be many comments on it. Do we read a
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 2, 2002
        Hi all,

        I'm new here and I'm about half way through Justine. I also
        read "High Wind in Jamaica" but there didn't seem to be many comments
        on it. Do we read a new book each month or does the time spent on
        each book vary?

        I was glad to see the comments from people who also don't care much
        for Justine as a character. It's the excess of existential despair
        and brooding intensity that makes me crazy. If she were a real
        person I would sit her down and force her to watch some funny movies
        or make faces at her until she lightened up.

        Usually I do need to have some sympathy or at least identification
        for one of more of the main characters to really get into reading a
        novel but the language used is so beautiful and poetic that I'm
        enjoying this anyway. I'm surprised every time I sit down to read it
        that I'm always disappointed when I have to stop and go do something
        else. Even though he tells you early on what is going to happen to
        some of the characters there's an air of something resembling
        suspense that I can't quite put my finger on.

        --Kathy



        --- In modernlibrary100greatestbooks@y..., gypsyjimmy1
        <no_reply@y...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > yes,james(that sounds so victorian) i think you are going to be
        quite
        > pleased with mr durrell.just slow it down and enjoy the ride.
        please
        > keep the comments up as you progress.
        > peace,
        > jim
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In modernlibrary100greatestbooks@y..., yarrbles <no_reply@y...>
        > wrote:
        > > --- In modernlibrary100greatestbooks@y..., gypsyjimmy1
        > > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > why agonize? just move on while we enjoy the quartet. we can
        > > > somehow survive.you won't have the agony and we will have the
        > estacy
        > > > (if you will).
        > > > peace' jim
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > Yes, Jim, you have a point. I would like to read the next in the
        > > Quartet since I have recently read that further novels elucidate
        > > themes and characters from Justine. I probably spoke too soon.
        Not
        > > sure why I had such a strong reaction. Durrell does have a
        sensual
        > > prose style that is both vivid and abstract at the same time. He
        is
        > > very good at teasing, letting you almost sip from a frosted glass
        > on
        > > a sweltering day before pulling it away from you. Maybe I should
        > just
        > > enjoy the tease. Need to give Justine another chance.
        > >
        > > James
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > --- In modernlibrary100greatestbooks@y..., yarrbles
        > <no_reply@y...>
        > > > wrote:
        > > > > I'm two thirds of the way through and I find the novel
        > agonizing.
        > > > The
        > > > > only interesting character so far is Balcazar, and he's
        barely
        > > > > mentioned. The characters are pompous, tedious, pretentious
        and
        > > > > thoroughly dull. If that is the point, then Durrell has more
        > than
        > > > > drummed it home. And yes, one should be invested in the
        > > > > characters in a novel to keep reading. Otherwise, one should
        > > write
        > > > > write poetry which Durrell apparently did before he decided
        to
        > > > > write "novels". I'll finish this one (I once pulled my own
        > toothe
        > > > out
        > > > > with a pair of pliers, so the pain should be about the same).
        > > God,
        > > > I
        > > > > hope we don't decide to read all four!
      • hecon_99
        I ve been thinking about the character of Justine, and I think she is left a mystery to the reader. I m wondering if the rest of the quartet tells more about
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 2, 2002
          I've been thinking about the character of Justine, and I think she is
          left a mystery to the reader. I'm wondering if the rest of the
          quartet tells more about her.

          Justine struck me as boring, pretentious, and totally depressing, but
          I wonder how much of her attitude grows from past tragedies. The book
          suggests too. The first is her molestation as a child. Did this
          happen? We learn of it only through the novel by her previous
          husband, which may be unreliable. But I think it did happen, because
          it fits events in the book reasonably well. The second is the loss of
          her daughter. That is only briefly alluded to and again second hand.
          Still it probably did happen--it explains the incident in the child
          brothel.
          Henry


          --- In modernlibrary100greatestbooks@y..., kamonkey2001
          <no_reply@y...> wrote:
          > Hi all,
          >
          >
          > I was glad to see the comments from people who also don't care much
          > for Justine as a character. It's the excess of existential despair
          > and brooding intensity that makes me crazy. If she were a real
          > person I would sit her down and force her to watch some funny
          movies
          > or make faces at her until she lightened up.
          >
          > Usually I do need to have some sympathy or at least identification
          > for one of more of the main characters to really get into reading a
          > novel but the language used is so beautiful and poetic that I'm
          > enjoying this anyway. I'm surprised every time I sit down to read
          it
          > that I'm always disappointed when I have to stop and go do
          something
          > else. Even though he tells you early on what is going to happen to
          > some of the characters there's an air of something resembling
          > suspense that I can't quite put my finger on.
          >
          > --Kathy
          >
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