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Light in August

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  • hecon_99
    So what do people think of this book so far. I think the lyrical style is great and the pictures of the characters fascinatting. My note from about one-third
    Message 1 of 11 , Nov 10, 2003
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      So what do people think of this book so far. I think the lyrical
      style is great and the pictures of the characters fascinatting.
      My note from about one-third in (spoiler space)












      Why does Christmas attack the black girl when he is 14? Is it an
      unconscious reaction to the dietician or the attitudes he learns from
      his stepfather? I'm afraid that Joe has been taught to hate himself,
      both his mixed ancestry and his sexuality.
      Henry
    • radtech134100
      I haven t started it yet. I will start today:-) Cindy ... from ... himself,
      Message 2 of 11 , Nov 10, 2003
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        I haven't started it yet. I will start today:-)

        Cindy

        --- In modernlibrary100greatestbooks@yahoogroups.com, hecon_99
        <no_reply@y...> wrote:
        > So what do people think of this book so far. I think the lyrical
        > style is great and the pictures of the characters fascinatting.
        > My note from about one-third in (spoiler space)
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Why does Christmas attack the black girl when he is 14? Is it an
        > unconscious reaction to the dietician or the attitudes he learns
        from
        > his stepfather? I'm afraid that Joe has been taught to hate
        himself,
        > both his mixed ancestry and his sexuality.
        > Henry
      • elizabeth davis
        I am on Chapter 5, I am enjoying it more than other Faulkner I ahve read. I always used to get confused about characters and plot line before, but this one
        Message 3 of 11 , Nov 12, 2003
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          I am on Chapter 5, I am enjoying it more than other
          Faulkner I ahve read. I always used to get confused
          about characters and plot line before, but this one
          seems to be making better sense. I do have a hard
          time telling if the characters are supposed to be
          black or white, does that matter? Any other thoughts?

          Elizabeth
          --- hecon_99 <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
          > So what do people think of this book so far. I think
          > the lyrical
          > style is great and the pictures of the characters
          > fascinatting.
          > My note from about one-third in (spoiler space)
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Why does Christmas attack the black girl when he is
          > 14? Is it an
          > unconscious reaction to the dietician or the
          > attitudes he learns from
          > his stepfather? I'm afraid that Joe has been taught
          > to hate himself,
          > both his mixed ancestry and his sexuality.
          > Henry
          >
          >


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        • hecon_99
          I noticed a few characters are not identified as to race when they are introduced. I think this may be a theme of the book, that although people of the time
          Message 4 of 11 , Nov 13, 2003
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            I noticed a few characters are not identified as to race when they
            are introduced. I think this may be a theme of the book, that
            although people of the time think that race is an overwhelmingly
            important distinction, really it isn't.
            Henry
            --- In modernlibrary100greatestbooks@yahoogroups.com, elizabeth davis
            <emd233@y...> wrote:
            > I am on Chapter 5, I am enjoying it more than other
            > Faulkner I ahve read. I always used to get confused
            > about characters and plot line before, but this one
            > seems to be making better sense. I do have a hard
            > time telling if the characters are supposed to be
            > black or white, does that matter? Any other thoughts?
            >
            > Elizabeth
            >
            > __________________________________
            > Do you Yahoo!?
            > Protect your identity with Yahoo! Mail AddressGuard
            > http://antispam.yahoo.com/whatsnewfree
          • Kathy Vidovich
            Me too. This is very easy to read, more like The Unvanquished than Absalom, Absalom (I got only 1/3 of the way through that one, hope to finish it some
            Message 5 of 11 , Nov 13, 2003
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              Me too. This is very easy to read, more like "The Unvanquished" than
              "Absalom, Absalom" (I got only 1/3 of the way through that one, hope to
              finish it some day).

              I've just started and am only a few chapters in.
              -----Original Message-----
              From: elizabeth davis [mailto:emd233@...]
              Sent: Wednesday, November 12, 2003 8:04 AM
              To: modernlibrary100greatestbooks@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [ModernLibrary 100 Greatest Books] Light in August


              I am on Chapter 5, I am enjoying it more than other
              Faulkner I ahve read. I always used to get confused
              about characters and plot line before, but this one
              seems to be making better sense. I do have a hard
              time telling if the characters are supposed to be
              black or white, does that matter? Any other thoughts?

              Elizabeth
              --- hecon_99 <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
              > So what do people think of this book so far. I think
              > the lyrical
              > style is great and the pictures of the characters
              > fascinatting.
              > My note from about one-third in (spoiler space)
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Why does Christmas attack the black girl when he is
              > 14? Is it an
              > unconscious reaction to the dietician or the
              > attitudes he learns from
              > his stepfather? I'm afraid that Joe has been taught
              > to hate himself,
              > both his mixed ancestry and his sexuality.
              > Henry
              >
              >


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            • hecon_99
              A few thoughts at the end. (apoiler space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . This book seems largely a story of Hightower. Hightower seems very much a prisoner of his
              Message 6 of 11 , Nov 19, 2003
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                A few thoughts at the end.
                (apoiler space
                .
                .
                .
                .
                .
                .
                .
                .
                .
                .
                .

                .
                .
                .
                This book seems largely a story of Hightower. Hightower seems very
                much a prisoner of his place and its history. He has suffered for his
                refusal to leave and for his failure to fulfill his wife's dreams of
                escape. Next to Joe Christmas, he seems the most important character.
                Brown/Burch seems to be a discount Joe Christmas. Rather than set up
                the bootlegging operation, he becomes a flunky to Christmas. Rather
                than murder the woman who loves him he deserts her.
                Why did Faulkner use the narrator to give us our last look at Leta
                and Byron. Was it to give us an assessment of how they would look as
                a couple to the people in that area? I think it might have been to
                set up a contrast between the married couple, which is what Leta and
                Byron could have been, and what Byron hoped for.
              • Kathy Vidovich
                Henry, I m far, far from the end, but I look forward to reading the rest of your message once I m a little further along. Overall, what was your opinion of the
                Message 7 of 11 , Nov 22, 2003
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                  Henry,

                  I'm far, far from the end, but I look forward to reading the rest of your
                  message once I'm a little further along.

                  Overall, what was your opinion of the book?

                  --Kathy
                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: hecon_99 [mailto:no_reply@yahoogroups.com]
                  Sent: Wednesday, November 19, 2003 1:27 PM
                  To: modernlibrary100greatestbooks@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: [ModernLibrary 100 Greatest Books] Light in August


                  A few thoughts at the end.
                  (apoiler space
                  .
                  .
                  .
                  .
                  .
                  .
                  .
                  .
                  .
                  .
                  .

                  .
                  .
                  .
                  This book seems largely a story of Hightower. Hightower seems very
                  much a prisoner of his place and its history. He has suffered for his
                  refusal to leave and for his failure to fulfill his wife's dreams of
                  escape. Next to Joe Christmas, he seems the most important character.
                  Brown/Burch seems to be a discount Joe Christmas. Rather than set up
                  the bootlegging operation, he becomes a flunky to Christmas. Rather
                  than murder the woman who loves him he deserts her.
                  Why did Faulkner use the narrator to give us our last look at Leta
                  and Byron. Was it to give us an assessment of how they would look as
                  a couple to the people in that area? I think it might have been to
                  set up a contrast between the married couple, which is what Leta and
                  Byron could have been, and what Byron hoped for.



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                  modernlibrary100greatestbooks-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



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                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • hecon_99
                  Kathy: Over all I thought it was a really great book, a beautifully written and compelling picture of an area and its people. I hope you enjoy the rest as much
                  Message 8 of 11 , Nov 22, 2003
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                    Kathy:
                    Over all I thought it was a really great book, a beautifully written
                    and compelling picture of an area and its people.
                    I hope you enjoy the rest as much as I did.
                    Henry
                    --- In modernlibrary100greatestbooks@yahoogroups.com, "Kathy Vidovich"
                    <kvidovich@e...> wrote:
                    > Henry,
                    >
                    > I'm far, far from the end, but I look forward to reading the rest of
                    your
                    > message once I'm a little further along.
                    >
                    > Overall, what was your opinion of the book?
                    >
                    > --Kathy
                    > -----Original Message-----
                    > From: hecon_99 [mailto:no_reply@yahoogroups.com]
                    > Sent: Wednesday, November 19, 2003 1:27 PM
                    > To: modernlibrary100greatestbooks@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: [ModernLibrary 100 Greatest Books] Light in August
                    >
                    >
                    > A few thoughts at the end.
                    > (apoiler space
                    > .
                    > .
                    > .
                    > .
                    > .
                    > .
                    > .
                    > .
                    > .
                    > .
                    > .
                    >
                    > .
                    > .
                    > .
                    > This book seems largely a story of Hightower. Hightower seems very
                    > much a prisoner of his place and its history. He has suffered for his
                    > refusal to leave and for his failure to fulfill his wife's dreams of
                    > escape. Next to Joe Christmas, he seems the most important character.
                    > Brown/Burch seems to be a discount Joe Christmas. Rather than set up
                    > the bootlegging operation, he becomes a flunky to Christmas. Rather
                    > than murder the woman who loves him he deserts her.
                    > Why did Faulkner use the narrator to give us our last look at Leta
                    > and Byron. Was it to give us an assessment of how they would look as
                    > a couple to the people in that area? I think it might have been to
                    > set up a contrast between the married couple, which is what Leta and
                    > Byron could have been, and what Byron hoped for.
                    >
                    >
                    >
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                    > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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                    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Kathy Vidovich
                    I just finished Light in August this morning, so I finally get to answer this email! Here s some spoiler space though, for anyone who might read the book
                    Message 9 of 11 , Dec 26, 2003
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                      I just finished "Light in August" this morning, so I finally get to answer
                      this email! Here's some spoiler space though, for anyone who might read the
                      book some day.






















                      I agree about the relationship between Brown and Christmas. At least
                      Christmas seems to stay around to see the relationship through to its
                      tragic, and mutual, end.

                      Also, I think you're right that this book is so much about Hightower, even
                      though he doesn't appear all that often until the end. That's an excellent
                      insight Henry, and it helps put the novel into a new perspective for me.

                      I think that one of the qualities that makes this a great novel is that
                      Faulkner manages to sharply sketch so many of the minor characters without
                      spending much space on them.

                      >>Was it to give us an assessment of how they would look as a couple to the
                      people in that area? I think it might have been to set up a contrast between
                      the married couple, which is what Leta and Byron could have been, and what
                      Byron hoped for.

                      For those reasons, but also, I think, the ending is reminiscent of a good
                      movie ending, and Faulkner did write for Hollywood for a little while. The
                      use of the new narrator allows Bunch and Lena to fade out and into the
                      distance of history, like moving from a close-up shot of their faces, then
                      slowly panning out to the landscape as seen from the air. It puts
                      everything into perspective for the audience. We can see that someday Brown
                      is not going to have much importance to either of them as a married couple,
                      and that this couple will become a family, and that their family will come
                      to fit in well in the small-town South. In the end, Brown was only the
                      instrument that brought them together.



                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: hecon_99 [mailto:no_reply@yahoogroups.com]
                      Sent: Wednesday, November 19, 2003 1:27 PM
                      To: modernlibrary100greatestbooks@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: [ModernLibrary 100 Greatest Books] Light in August


                      A few thoughts at the end.
                      (apoiler space
                      .
                      .
                      .
                      .
                      .
                      .
                      .
                      .
                      .
                      .
                      .

                      .
                      .
                      .
                      This book seems largely a story of Hightower. Hightower seems very
                      much a prisoner of his place and its history. He has suffered for his
                      refusal to leave and for his failure to fulfill his wife's dreams of
                      escape. Next to Joe Christmas, he seems the most important character.
                      Brown/Burch seems to be a discount Joe Christmas. Rather than set up
                      the bootlegging operation, he becomes a flunky to Christmas. Rather
                      than murder the woman who loves him he deserts her.
                      Why did Faulkner use the narrator to give us our last look at Leta
                      and Byron. Was it to give us an assessment of how they would look as
                      a couple to the people in that area? I think it might have been to
                      set up a contrast between the married couple, which is what Leta and
                      Byron could have been, and what Byron hoped for.



                      Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                      ADVERTISEMENT




                      To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                      modernlibrary100greatestbooks-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



                      Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • hecon_99
                      Kathy: (spoiler space)s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s Thanks for your comments. I wonder though how well Leta and Byron will fit into the small town life in the
                      Message 10 of 11 , Dec 27, 2003
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                        Kathy:
                        (spoiler space)s
                        s
                        s
                        s
                        s
                        s
                        s
                        s
                        s
                        s
                        s
                        s
                        s
                        s
                        s
                        Thanks for your comments. I wonder though how well Leta and Byron will
                        fit into the small town life in the future. The last lines of the book
                        suggested to me that Leta liked the road and did not want to settle down.














                        --- In modernlibrary100greatestbooks@yahoogroups.com, "Kathy Vidovich"
                        <kvidovich@e...> wrote:
                        > I just finished "Light in August" this morning, so I finally get to
                        answer
                        > this email! Here's some spoiler space though, for anyone who might
                        read the
                        > book some day.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                      • Kathy Vidovich
                        Henry, * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Yes, that did occur to me too. Have you ever read any Isaac Bashevis Singer? I was reminded of his short story Altele
                        Message 11 of 11 , Dec 29, 2003
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                          Henry,
                          *
                          *
                          *
                          *
                          *
                          *
                          *
                          *
                          *
                          *
                          *
                          *
                          *
                          *
                          *
                          Yes, that did occur to me too. Have you ever read any Isaac Bashevis
                          Singer? I was reminded of his short story "Altele" which appears in the
                          short story collection "A Friend of Kafka".

                          But I changed my mind near the end because the temporary narrator says "And
                          so I think she had just made up her mind to travel a little further and see
                          as much as she could, since I reckon she knew that when she settled down
                          this time, it would likely be for the rest of her life." This seems true
                          because it's more consistent with her character and the fact that she had
                          basically accepted Byron Bunch as her husband-to-be, telling him she didn't
                          want him to give up trying. This strikes me as what any woman in her
                          situation had to do - make Byron expend *some* effort to get her - since
                          otherwise the romance might always be remembered as an act of charity on his
                          part. Actually Byron had already expended a great deal of effort to be with
                          her, but neither of them can admit that, because he acted, on the surface at
                          least, as though he were just a concerned Southern gentleman helping someone
                          else's wife in distress.
                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: hecon_99 [mailto:no_reply@yahoogroups.com]
                          Sent: Saturday, December 27, 2003 6:20 AM
                          To: modernlibrary100greatestbooks@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: [ModernLibrary 100 Greatest Books] Re: Light in August


                          Kathy:
                          (spoiler space)s
                          s
                          s
                          s
                          s
                          s
                          s
                          s
                          s
                          s
                          s
                          s
                          s
                          s
                          s
                          Thanks for your comments. I wonder though how well Leta and Byron will
                          fit into the small town life in the future. The last lines of the book
                          suggested to me that Leta liked the road and did not want to settle down.














                          --- In modernlibrary100greatestbooks@yahoogroups.com, "Kathy Vidovich"
                          <kvidovich@e...> wrote:
                          > I just finished "Light in August" this morning, so I finally get to
                          answer
                          > this email! Here's some spoiler space though, for anyone who might
                          read the
                          > book some day.
                          >
                          >
                          >



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