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Study: Marijuana Has Little Effect On Driving

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    Study: Marijuana Has Little Effect On Driving Report Shows Drivers Become Easily Distracted POSTED: Monday, June 7, 2010 UPDATED: 1:07 pm EDT June 7, 2010
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 7, 2010
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      Study: Marijuana Has Little Effect On Driving

      Report Shows Drivers Become Easily Distracted


      POSTED: Monday, June 7, 2010
      UPDATED: 1:07 pm EDT June 7, 2010

      http://www.clickondetroit.com/automotive/23818884/detail.html


      HARTFORD, Conn. -- A study from researchers based at Hartford Hospital
      reveals that marijuana has little effect on the group's simulated
      driving skills, but did find drivers were more easily distracted under
      the influence.

      Researchers from Hartford Hospital and the University of Iowa Carver
      College of Medicine assessed the simulated driving performance of 85
      subjects in a double-blind, placebo controlled trial.

      Volunteers responded to various simulated events, which were associated
      with automobile crash risk. Those risks included a driver who was
      entering an intersection illegally, deciding to stop or go through a
      changing traffic light, responding to a presence of emergency vehicles,
      avoiding a collision with a dog who entered into traffic and maintaining
      safe driving during an in-the-car distraction.

      "It does not in any way say that it is safe to drive under the influence
      of any drug," said investigator Beth Anderson, PhD. "It merely shows us,
      we need to study this further. We need to know what marijuana does to
      the brain. We need to understand the ramifications. To create public
      policy and to keep people safe, you need to know what's really happening
      in the brain. You need to know the science behind it. You have to have
      the facts."

      The marijuana used in the study was provided by the National Institute
      of Drug Abuse and the University of Mississippi, the only legal source
      of cannabis in the United States.

      "The results do not imply that it is safe to drive under the influence
      of marijuana, especially because we know people aren't just smoking
      marijuana," said Anderson. "They do it while drinking. They do this when
      others are in the car, listening to music, talking on cell phones or
      texting. These behaviors distract drivers and are even more dangerous
      when someone has been using marijuana."


      http://www.clickondetroit.com/automotive/23818884/detail.html
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