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Messed Up - Final Chapter

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  • cooltool49
    Greetings, I am much calmer today, and have had time to reflect on the miter box incident of Apr 1. I took a pic of the blade and created some thoughts on the
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 2, 2004
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      Greetings,
      I am much calmer today, and have had time to reflect on the miter box
      incident of Apr 1. I took a pic of the blade and created some
      thoughts on the incident and posted them on my personal web space. If
      you desire to see the blade, go to the following link. I hope this
      will lay this topic to rest.
      Jerry

      http://home.gci.net/~jmorris/Blade%20Story.html
    • Patrick Parsons
      Hello Jerry, My name is Patrick, I am new to the group and researching which lathe I will purchase soon. However, I read your account of what happened and
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 8, 2004
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        Hello Jerry,

        My name is Patrick, I am new to the group and "researching " which lathe I
        will purchase soon.
        However,

        I read your account of what happened and looked very closely at the photo
        you provided. Yes you are very lucky to not have been injured. I'm replying
        because of my experiences cutting metal that I'd like to pass on. I am a
        wrecker mechanic. I often modify and fabricate much of our equipment. I
        enjoy working with the metal more than turning wrenches on the trucks. About
        6 months ago we upgraded our abrasive type cutoff saw to a new Dewalt metal
        cutoff saw. This saw spins at a slower RPM than your typical wood saw or
        abrasive cutoff saw. As many of you know, abrasive saws make a lot of sparks
        and noise when cutting. the new sat makes much less noise and almost now
        sparks. It has a 14inch blade. I think the first blade we put on it had
        something like 60 or 70 teeth (carbide tipped) this thing will cut through
        1/2" x 4" flat bar like butter and you can actually pick up the cut piece
        of metal only second after it was cut with your bare hands and it will be
        only slightly warm. We just put a new blade on it yesterday with a 90 tooth
        count. we tested it on a 1 1/4" x 1 1/4" x 1/8" thick steel angle and I
        swear, if you were not looking at the metal, you could not even here it
        being cut. Anyway I'm telling you this to let you know that there are
        carbide tipped blades on the market DESIGNED for cutting metal. We converted
        our other saw that looks just like the one you have with a 10 inch blade to
        cut metal also. However, the motor does not have the tork to cut heavy
        stuff, so it is used primarily to cut accurate angles on thin walled steel.
        i.e.. 1/8" wall , it will cut heavier steel,but much slower and does push
        the limits of the saw.

        I have had a pipe get caught up in the larger saw and it did scare the
        begeezes out of me and made the first of a couple mishaps with the was that
        removed a few carbide teeth from the blade. I will NOT let anyone use the
        saw with out proper safety instruction, mostly related to the fact that
        using a carbide blade is not like using and abrasive blade. with the
        abrasive blade, I could just hold the metal stock in place and cut it, but
        with a carbide blade everything MUST be clamped in place, especially if when
        the blade is making the final bit of the cut it is actually doing it on the
        "upswing" of the blade, because this is when it will grab the metal and
        create a disaster faster than you can blink and eye, by the time you realize
        something went wrong, it is over and the damage is done.

        With that said, I will highly recommend anyone who does not have one get a
        3" hand held cutoff tool. I use mine all the time. Once your are comfortable
        with it you will become amazed at how accurately and delicately you can cut
        things. I have used it on steel, alum.,copper.plastic,wood, hardened steel
        and even small amounts of granite. I don't recommend this, but I have found
        the tool to be much more versatile by removing the shield that covers half
        the blade, you get used to the little sparks (they don't hurt or burn) and
        you can see what your doing better. ALWAYS wear EYE PROTECTION You can get
        assorted thickness blades for diff. cutting needs. and with the shield
        removed I can use 4" blades when necessary. harbor freight sells them
        inexpensively and they are just as good as the more expensive ones.

        Best regards,

        Patrick.
        -----Original Message-----
        From: cooltool49 [mailto:cooltool49@...]
        Sent: Friday, April 02, 2004 12:06 PM
        To: mlathemods@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [mlathemods] Messed Up - Final Chapter


        Greetings,
        I am much calmer today, and have had time to reflect on the miter box
        incident of Apr 1. I took a pic of the blade and created some
        thoughts on the incident and posted them on my personal web space. If
        you desire to see the blade, go to the following link. I hope this
        will lay this topic to rest.
        Jerry

        http://home.gci.net/~jmorris/Blade%20Story.html





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Brian Drummond
        ... For a piece of aluminium as small as you describe, I wouldn t dream of firing up a power tool! Keep a hacksaw with a sharp blade, and it ll do small jobs
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 8, 2004
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          On Fri, 02 Apr 2004 18:05:37 -0000, you wrote:

          >Greetings,
          >I am much calmer today, and have had time to reflect on the miter box
          >incident of Apr 1. I took a pic of the blade and created some
          >thoughts on the incident and posted them on my personal web space. If
          >you desire to see the blade, go to the following link. I hope this
          >will lay this topic to rest.
          >Jerry
          >
          >http://home.gci.net/~jmorris/Blade%20Story.html

          For a piece of aluminium as small as you describe, I wouldn't dream of
          firing up a power tool! Keep a hacksaw with a sharp blade, and it'll do
          small jobs almost as fast (much faster if you take workholding into
          account) and a good deal safer...

          Cheers, and congratulations on being alive and in one piece...

          - Brian
        • viaconsu
          And don t forget to cool aluminium with methylated spirits or hard animal grease; DAMHIK.... Hans who cuts even small pieces of aluminium, brass and bronze on
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 9, 2004
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            And don't forget to cool aluminium with methylated spirits or hard
            animal grease; DAMHIK....
            Hans
            who cuts even small pieces of aluminium, brass and bronze on his 8"
            INCA cabinet makers circular saw, using a fine toothed 6" HSS saw

            --- In mlathemods@yahoogroups.com, Brian Drummond <brian@s...> wrote:
            > On Fri, 02 Apr 2004 18:05:37 -0000, you wrote:
            >
            > >Greetings,
            > >I am much calmer today, and have had time to reflect on the miter
            box
            > >incident of Apr 1. I took a pic of the blade and created some
            > >thoughts on the incident and posted them on my personal web space.
            If
            > >you desire to see the blade, go to the following link. I hope this
            > >will lay this topic to rest.
            > >Jerry
            > >
            > >http://home.gci.net/~jmorris/Blade%20Story.html
            >
            > For a piece of aluminium as small as you describe, I wouldn't dream
            of
            > firing up a power tool! Keep a hacksaw with a sharp blade, and
            it'll do
            > small jobs almost as fast (much faster if you take workholding into
            > account) and a good deal safer...
            >
            > Cheers, and congratulations on being alive and in one piece...
            >
            > - Brian
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