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Spindles book

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  • Harprit Singh Sandhu
    Bob: The book is about making spindles to do milling work on lathes. Has a lot of real lathe technique information in it. Do a google search on Harprit
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 31, 2004
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      Bob:

      The book is about making spindles to do milling work on lathes. Has
      a lot of real lathe technique information in it.

      Do a google search on "Harprit Sandhu" and find tens of sellers

      Published by the Model Engineer as workshop series #27.

      Thanks/Regards
      Harprit Singh Sandhu
    • Peter
      i got my coppy from chronos http://www.chronos.ltd.uk/ definatly a worthwhile purchase im glad i got it, worth every penny peter ... Has
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 7, 2004
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        i got my coppy from chronos http://www.chronos.ltd.uk/ definatly a
        worthwhile purchase im glad i got it, worth every penny

        peter

        --- In mlathemods@yahoogroups.com, "Harprit Singh Sandhu"
        <Harprit_Sandhu@h...> wrote:
        > Bob:
        >
        > The book is about making spindles to do milling work on lathes.
        Has
        > a lot of real lathe technique information in it.
        >
        > Do a google search on "Harprit Sandhu" and find tens of sellers
        >
        > Published by the Model Engineer as workshop series #27.
        >
        > Thanks/Regards
        > Harprit Singh Sandhu
      • Harprit Singh Sandhu
        Peter, Thank you so much for the kind words!! You might enjoy seeing the indexer I am describing on the net Go to this for plans. jpeg and AutoCad both are
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 7, 2004
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          Peter,

          Thank you so much for the kind words!!
          You might enjoy seeing the indexer I am describing on the net

          Go to this for plans. jpeg and AutoCad both are posted.

          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Metal_Shapers_Pix/files/

          Go to this to see progress under S7 file

          http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/Metal_Shapers_Pix/lst

          I will have casting early next month some time for sale. Should be
          reasonable but I don't have the prices from the foundry yet.
          Cant buy one but you can build your own.

          Harprit Singh Sandhu
          Author of the book
          Scientist, Engineer but Mostly Journeman Machinist.
        • David C. Hearn
          Harprit, Thank you for the very educational post on alignment. I just got a Cummins 7x12, and I just completed its cleaning, lubrication, and deburring of some
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 12, 2004
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            Harprit,
            Thank you for the very educational post on alignment. I just got a
            Cummins 7x12, and I just completed its cleaning, lubrication, and
            deburring of some of its components and I now have it up and running.
            I plan to adjust its gibs tomorrow, and check it for alignment. I
            have read up on the topic in some books from the library, but your
            explanation gave me a clearer picture of the process. Thank you very
            much and good luck with your book. God Bless, Dave H.

            --- In mlathemods@yahoogroups.com, "Harprit Singh Sandhu"
            <Harprit_Sandhu@h...> wrote:
            > Detailed procedure for aligning a lathe headstock and tailstock.
            >
            > Things to remember
            > The axis of the bed is the master surface that you cannot modify so
            > we have to fit everything to it.
            > The cross slide needs to be at right angles to the bed. This may
            not
            > be so, so keep this in mind.
            > The cross side should cut a very very very very slightly concave
            > surface when cutting right.
            > (If the headstock is off you will not be able to do this)
            > First the headstock.
            > It has to be parallel to the bed
            > Up and down For now let us assume this is ok.
            > In and out
            > Left and right along the bed does not matter.
            > Lets assume that the case is hopeless
            > A 6 inch rod in the chuck is 1/4 inch out of line with a point in
            the
            > tailstock
            > First face the end of the bar so you can see where the center is
            > Next pull the tailstock out 1/4 inch and drill a small center on
            the
            > rotating center of the bar as close as you can.
            > Next bring a tailstock center up to this. (So things don't flex
            when
            > we take the cuts.)
            > Now you can cut two 1/4 inch long spots on the bar with the cross
            > slide at the exact same setting. One near the chuck and one near
            the
            > tailstock. These when measured accurately, will tell you how far
            the
            > lathe is off. Now we have an idea of what the problem is. (in
            > reality this will not be 1/4 inch but a few thou). Run a
            calculation
            > to get at idea of how much has to be taken off somewhere along the
            > headstock base to get things right. Since shim stock is cheap,
            this
            > is often a good solution. Using shims does not destroy anything
            and
            > they can be used to effective add material to the casting! Use
            shims
            > first and then if you get brave you can scrape and file and
            whatever.
            > So now you can play with the headstock till you get it right
            >
            > The up and down adjustment is a bit harder, but similar. You will
            > have to shim the tailstock up to drill the center hole at the
            > rotating center. Then follow the same plan. Since the tailstock
            has
            > to slide back and forth it cannot be shimmed so all the shimming
            > needs to be done at the headstock.
            >
            > It is also possible that the tailstock will have to be scraped and
            > then the headstock brought to its centerline. Unfortunately that's
            > the way it is.
            >
            > Test
            > If you can put a small say one inch long rod in the headstock and
            > ream a 1/4 inch hole in it. Remove it and the chuck and using a
            > drill and reamer in the headstock in another chuck ream a 1/4 inch
            > hole in a 1/2 inch rod held in the tailstock you have a test rig.
            > Put the first chuck back on the headstock.
            >
            > You now have two reamed holes that should be perfectly in line. A
            > ground rod with clean ends should be able to be moved
            simultaneously
            > in both holes by hand with no or minimal resistance. This is your
            > goal. Right?
            >
            > Commercially they used very accurately made plates held in the
            Morse
            > tapers to check alignment. I don't know what they do now but CNC
            > machines have created a brave new world!
            >
            > Thanks/Regards
            > Harprit Singh Sandhu
            > Author of that "Spindles" book
            > Considered by some to be a treatise on how to use a lathe to do
            some
            > interesting things.
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