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An Introduction to the Wood Lathe Chuck

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  • Steven Prescott
    A wood lathe chuck can be an excellent addition to any wood lathe. A chuck allows one to turn smaller pieces of wood with a high degree of flexibility
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 12, 2011
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      A wood lathe chuck can be an excellent addition to any wood lathe. A chuck allows one to turn smaller pieces of wood with a high degree of flexibility while avoiding the inconvenience supporting the wood with the tailstock.
      Many people use wood lathe chucks for smaller projects. They are an absolutely necessary tool for anyone who would like to turn wooden bowls or similar items.
      You can choose your wood lathe chuck from two different options. Three-jaw chucks center the wood in the lathe automatically and are well suited for symmetrical projects. That is because these chucks basically immobilize the wood, which means all rounding will be toward the true center of the wood. These are the lathe chucks with which most woodworkers first experiment. They produce great results, even though they are somewhat limited in what they can do.
      A four-jaw wood lathe chuck offers more flexibility. These chucks allow the lathe user to move the wood during the turning process. This allows the operator to create rounded pieces that are not necessarily symmetrical or centered. These chucks are ideal for those who are handling very specialized aspects of custom projects and for artists who do not want to find themselves limited any more than necessary.
      Suppliers provide three-jaw and four-jaw chucks in multiple sizes. A jewelry maker may find himself using a tiny, one-inch chuck. Meanwhile, a turner of a large wooden bowl may work with a chuck with a full two-foot diameter! There is a chuck for every project and every preference.
      Your choice of a chuck size must be governed by two factors: the size of the lathe upon which the chuck will be used and the size of the wood pieces you plan to turn. Before you purchase a wood lathe chuck, double check your lathe's capacity and determine the chuck's intended use. That will help you to secure the right tool for your specific needs.
      Lathe chucks can produce some amazing effects. Any lathe-using woodworker will be able to find a number of uses for these tools.
      At the same time, it is important to note that these devices are best managed by experienced lathe users. That is particularly true of the manually manipulate four-jaw chuck. Additionally, numerous accidents occur when chucks become stuck. Anyone using a wood lathe chuck should make safety a top priority and should know the proper procedure for handling a stuck chuck.
      source : http://serdal-b.blogspot.com
      article : http://serdal-b.blogspot.com/2011/04/introduction-to-wood-lathe-chuck.html
    • oldstudentmsgt
      do you intend to post this to every metalworking group on Yahoo? If so, why bother? I ve seen it, I think, 8 or 9 times now. I read it once, and for anyone who
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 14, 2011
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        do you intend to post this to every metalworking group on Yahoo? If so, why bother? I've seen it, I think, 8 or 9 times now. I read it once, and for anyone who has a wood lathe, and no chuck, it's probably a useful thing to know, but most folks with metalworking lathes have at least one chuck, already, and frequently more than that. I've got very little tooling for my lathe, but I do own the stock 3" 3-jaw, and a 5" 4-jaw independent jaw chuck. And plan on a collet chuck, too, one of these days.

        If you're just trying to get some of the less active groups started talking again, I guess that makes sense, so for it!

        Bill in OKC
        --- In mlathemods@yahoogroups.com, Steven Prescott <prescott.steven@...> wrote:
        >
        > A wood lathe chuck can be an excellent addition to any wood lathe. A chuck
        > allows one to turn smaller pieces of wood with a high degree of flexibility
        > while avoiding the inconvenience supporting the wood with the tailstock.
        > Many people use wood lathe chucks for smaller projects. They are an absolutely
        > necessary tool for anyone who would like to turn wooden bowls or similar
        > items.
        > You can choose your wood lathe chuck from two different options. Three-jaw
        > chucks center the wood in the lathe automatically and are well suited for
        > symmetrical projects. That is because these chucks basically immobilize the
        > wood, which means all rounding will be toward the true center of the wood.
        > These are the lathe chucks with which most woodworkers first experiment. They
        > produce great results, even though they are somewhat limited in what they can
        > do.
        > A four-jaw wood lathe chuck offers more flexibility. These chucks allow the
        > lathe user to move the wood during the turning process. This allows the
        > operator to create rounded pieces that are not necessarily symmetrical or
        > centered. These chucks are ideal for those who are handling very specialized
        > aspects of custom projects and for artists who do not want to find themselves
        > limited any more than necessary.
        > Suppliers provide three-jaw and four-jaw chucks in multiple sizes. A jewelry
        > maker may find himself using a tiny, one-inch chuck. Meanwhile, a turner of a
        > large wooden bowl may work with a chuck with a full two-foot diameter! There
        > is a chuck for every project and every preference.
        > Your choice of a chuck size must be governed by two factors: the size of the
        > lathe upon which the chuck will be used and the size of the wood pieces you
        > plan to turn. Before you purchase a wood lathe chuck, double check your
        > lathe's capacity and determine the chuck's intended use. That will help you to
        > secure the right tool for your specific needs.
        > Lathe chucks can produce some amazing effects. Any lathe-using woodworker will
        > be able to find a number of uses for these tools.
        > At the same time, it is important to note that these devices are best managed
        > by experienced lathe users. That is particularly true of the manually
        > manipulate four-jaw chuck. Additionally, numerous accidents occur when chucks
        > become stuck. Anyone using a wood lathe chuck should make safety a top
        > priority and should know the proper procedure for handling a stuck chuck.
        > source : http://serdal-b.blogspot.com
        > article :
        > http://serdal-b.blogspot.com/2011/04/introduction-to-wood-lathe-chuck.html
        >
      • keith gutshall
        Hi Bill  I think this guy is talking trash about chucks.  Most wood working chucks are a 4 jaw scroll type chuck.  I am like you, why is he talking about
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 14, 2011
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          Hi Bill
           I think this guy is talking trash about chucks.
           Most wood working chucks are a 4 jaw scroll type chuck.
           I am like you, why is he talking about woodworking on a
          metalworking group?
           
           Keith

          Deep Run Portage
          Back Shop
          " The Lizard Works"

          --- On Thu, 4/14/11, oldstudentmsgt <wmrmeyers@...> wrote:

          From: oldstudentmsgt <wmrmeyers@...>
          Subject: [mlathemods] Re: An Introduction to the Wood Lathe Chuck
          To: mlathemods@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Thursday, April 14, 2011, 6:29 AM

           
          do you intend to post this to every metalworking group on Yahoo? If so, why bother? I've seen it, I think, 8 or 9 times now. I read it once, and for anyone who has a wood lathe, and no chuck, it's probably a useful thing to know, but most folks with metalworking lathes have at least one chuck, already, and frequently more than that. I've got very little tooling for my lathe, but I do own the stock 3" 3-jaw, and a 5" 4-jaw independent jaw chuck. And plan on a collet chuck, too, one of these days.

          If you're just trying to get some of the less active groups started talking again, I guess that makes sense, so for it!

          Bill in OKC
          --- In mlathemods@yahoogroups.com, Steven Prescott <prescott.steven@...> wrote:
          >
          > A wood lathe chuck can be an excellent addition to any wood lathe. A chuck
          > allows one to turn smaller pieces of wood with a high degree of flexibility
          > while avoiding the inconvenience supporting the wood with the tailstock.
          > Many people use wood lathe chucks for smaller projects. They are an absolutely
          > necessary tool for anyone who would like to turn wooden bowls or similar
          > items.
          > You can choose your wood lathe chuck from two different options. Three-jaw
          > chucks center the wood in the lathe automatically and are well suited for
          > symmetrical projects. That is because these chucks basically immobilize the
          > wood, which means all rounding will be toward the true center of the wood.
          > These are the lathe chucks with which most woodworkers first experiment. They
          > produce great results, even though they are somewhat limited in what they can
          > do.
          > A four-jaw wood lathe chuck offers more flexibility. These chucks allow the
          > lathe user to move the wood during the turning process. This allows the
          > operator to create rounded pieces that are not necessarily symmetrical or
          > centered. These chucks are ideal for those who are handling very specialized
          > aspects of custom projects and for artists who do not want to find themselves
          > limited any more than necessary.
          > Suppliers provide three-jaw and four-jaw chucks in multiple sizes. A jewelry
          > maker may find himself using a tiny, one-inch chuck. Meanwhile, a turner of a
          > large wooden bowl may work with a chuck with a full two-foot diameter! There
          > is a chuck for every project and every preference.
          > Your choice of a chuck size must be governed by two factors: the size of the
          > lathe upon which the chuck will be used and the size of the wood pieces you
          > plan to turn. Before you purchase a wood lathe chuck, double check your
          > lathe's capacity and determine the chuck's intended use. That will help you to
          > secure the right tool for your specific needs.
          > Lathe chucks can produce some amazing effects. Any lathe-using woodworker will
          > be able to find a number of uses for these tools.
          > At the same time, it is important to note that these devices are best managed
          > by experienced lathe users. That is particularly true of the manually
          > manipulate four-jaw chuck. Additionally, numerous accidents occur when chucks
          > become stuck. Anyone using a wood lathe chuck should make safety a top
          > priority and should know the proper procedure for handling a stuck chuck.
          > source : http://serdal-b.blogspot.com
          > article :
          > http://serdal-b.blogspot.com/2011/04/introduction-to-wood-lathe-chuck.html
          >

        • Tony Smith
          He’s spamming his website / blog. You’ll find it’ll be chock full of ads, probably for drugs or Rolex watches. He might be genuinely try to stir up
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 17, 2011
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            He’s spamming his website / blog. 

             

            You’ll find it’ll be chock full of ads, probably for drugs or Rolex watches.  He might be genuinely try to stir up interest, but I’m not interested enough to go and see.

             

            Tony

             

             

            Hi Bill

             I think this guy is talking trash about chucks.

             Most wood working chucks are a 4 jaw scroll type chuck.

             I am like you, why is he talking about woodworking on a

            metalworking group?

             

             Keith

            Deep Run Portage
            Back Shop
            " The Lizard Works"

            --- On Thu, 4/14/11, oldstudentmsgt <wmrmeyers@...> wrote:


            From: oldstudentmsgt <wmrmeyers@...>
            Subject: [mlathemods] Re: An Introduction to the Wood Lathe Chuck
            To: mlathemods@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Thursday, April 14, 2011, 6:29 AM

             

            do you intend to post this to every metalworking group on Yahoo? If so, why bother? I've seen it, I think, 8 or 9 times now. I read it once, and for anyone who has a wood lathe, and no chuck, it's probably a useful thing to know, but most folks with metalworking lathes have at least one chuck, already, and frequently more than that. I've got very little tooling for my lathe, but I do own the stock 3" 3-jaw, and a 5" 4-jaw independent jaw chuck. And plan on a collet chuck, too, one of these days.

            If you're just trying to get some of the less active groups started talking again, I guess that makes sense, so for it!

            Bill in OKC
            --- In mlathemods@yahoogroups.com, Steven Prescott <prescott.steven@...> wrote:
            >
            > A wood lathe chuck can be an excellent addition to any wood lathe. A chuck

            >


            ,_._,___

          • oldstudentmsgt
            I think pimping his website is more like it. If his writeup had been very interesting, I might have given him the web hit. Unfortunately, it s like is seen
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 18, 2011
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              I think "pimping" his website is more like it. If his writeup had been very interesting, I might have given him the web hit. Unfortunately, it's like is seen in every elementary woodlathe book in the library. "It's good and useful, you should get one!"


              Bill in OKC

              --- In mlathemods@yahoogroups.com, "Tony Smith" <ajsmith1968@...> wrote:
              >
              > He’s spamming his website / blog.
              >
              >
              >
              > You’ll find it’ll be chock full of ads, probably for drugs or Rolex watches. He might be genuinely try to stir up interest, but I’m not interested enough to go and see.
              >
              >
              >
              > Tony
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Hi Bill
              >
              > I think this guy is talking trash about chucks.
              >
              > Most wood working chucks are a 4 jaw scroll type chuck.
              >
              > I am like you, why is he talking about woodworking on a
              >
              > metalworking group?
              >
              >
              >
              > Keith
              >
              > Deep Run Portage
              > Back Shop
              > " The Lizard Works"
              >
              > --- On Thu, 4/14/11, oldstudentmsgt <wmrmeyers@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > From: oldstudentmsgt <wmrmeyers@...>
              > Subject: [mlathemods] Re: An Introduction to the Wood Lathe Chuck
              > To: mlathemods@yahoogroups.com
              > Date: Thursday, April 14, 2011, 6:29 AM
              >
              >
              >
              > do you intend to post this to every metalworking group on Yahoo? If so, why bother? I've seen it, I think, 8 or 9 times now. I read it once, and for anyone who has a wood lathe, and no chuck, it's probably a useful thing to know, but most folks with metalworking lathes have at least one chuck, already, and frequently more than that. I've got very little tooling for my lathe, but I do own the stock 3" 3-jaw, and a 5" 4-jaw independent jaw chuck. And plan on a collet chuck, too, one of these days.
              >
              > If you're just trying to get some of the less active groups started talking again, I guess that makes sense, so for it!
              >
              > Bill in OKC
              > --- In mlathemods@yahoogroups.com <http://us.mc328.mail.yahoo.com/mc/compose?to=mlathemods%40yahoogroups.com> , Steven Prescott <prescott.steven@> wrote:
              > >
              > > A wood lathe chuck can be an excellent addition to any wood lathe. A chuck
              >
              > >
              >
              >
              > ,_._,___
              >
            • Tony Smith
              ... I went and had a look, it s just something he s copied from somewhere else. His blog has an entire 6 posts, (all added in about 10 minutes), the other
              Message 6 of 6 , Apr 18, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                > I think "pimping" his website is more like it. If his writeup had been
                > very interesting, I might have given him the web hit. Unfortunately,
                > it's like is seen in every elementary woodlathe book in the library.
                > "It's good and useful, you should get one!"


                I went and had a look, it's just something he's copied from somewhere else.
                His 'blog' has an entire 6 posts, (all added in about 10 minutes), the other
                one in the wood category is about wood ticks! I suppose you could put one
                in a 4-jaw chuck, that'd kill it I guess.

                I use FireFox with AdBlock & NoScript, so I can't tell you what ads or
                malware was there.

                Wood lathe 4-jaw chucks are interesting, but not that much use on a metal
                lathe. They're usually scroll (self-centering) but their main attraction is
                the jaw attachments, lots of odd shapes for holding bowls etc.

                One day the scammers will find real jobs. (I can dream...)

                Tony
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