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Re: new member

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  • Lee
    Hi Augustine, I was just brousing through my many posts of yahoo groups and read your comments I really liked your tricycle very invetive you should do well
    Message 1 of 17 , Dec 19, 2008
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      Hi Augustine,

      I was just brousing through my many posts of yahoo groups and read
      your comments I really liked your tricycle very invetive you should do
      well when you get your equiptment btw don't forget to get a band saw
      your shoulder and arm will say thanks. you can see some of my projects
      on thelinks below if you have'nt joined these groups you should so
      look around and tell me what you think.
    • Lee
      Hay Tony, Cap here If you can find a women that is cheeper then metal working grab her and take her home for keeps. she canhelp keep the chips a flying.
      Message 2 of 17 , Dec 19, 2008
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        Hay Tony, Cap here
        If you can find a women that is cheeper then metal working grab
        her and take her home for keeps. she canhelp keep the chips a flying.
      • Gus Rodriguez
        Hi Tony, No, I ve been there and done that too. Women are definitely NOT cheaper. The tool stores will settle for a sizeable chunk of your money but women want
        Message 3 of 17 , Dec 19, 2008
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          Hi Tony,
           
          No, I've been there and done that too. Women are definitely NOT cheaper. The tool stores will settle for a sizeable chunk of your money but women want it ALL! LOL. As for the extras, yeah I've already been planning on that too. Got my list of stuff all ready. I've always liked scratch building scale models of stuff like boats, planes, tanks, etc. and if that's all I was going to use it for, then the little mini lathe and milling machine would be great ... but I've got bigger things in mind. I've got a bender ... BUT ... this was only an initial prototype. It's a lot easier to cut and weld tubing when you're playing around with the different proportions as to length, width, etc. If I had bent it and decided to change it (which I did, several times) I still would have ended up cutting and welding ... or just replacing the entire section that I was modifying. I drew up plans for the thing a long time ago, but when I saw it in front of me, I found a number of proportions that I decided to change ... more for esthetics than anything else.
           
          In fact, this one is much heavier than it needs to be, 'cause I used the cheapest welded seam tubing I could get with the thought that I would end up using something like a much smaller diameter DOM tubing in the final production version. For the initial road test, I took the thing down the road about a mile and a half to a little convenience store but then several of my grandkids put about 200 miles on the thing over a two week period recently. They tell me that ALL their friends want one! And my 17 year old grandson Josh called it a "chick magnet" 'cause everywhere he went, the girls were crowding around to talk to him about it. Needless to say, he had a lot of fun.
           
          I've even considered building the frame out of carbon fiber, but I would still need the lathe and milling machine to make my own specialized wheel hubs, jackshafts, steering components, etc. But like I wrote before, I gotta pay for Christmas first. I can hardly wait!
           
          As for the crank placement (pedals), it's actually just about right. This is what's called a "delta" style trike but on the other style called a "tadpole" with the two wheels in the front, the crank placement is usually even with or higher than the rider's hips! That is done for aerodynamics and to lower the center of gravity as much as possible. This one is also a "cargo trike", although I did not finish the cargo box since it's still just a prototype. In this case, aerodynamics are not a real issue 'cause it's not built for speed. I may end up building front and rear fairings for it later, but that's a good way down the road.
           
          Only the left rear wheel is driven off the pedal drive and you'de never know it riding down the road. It doesn't pull to one side at all. This is deliberate, because the final production version will also have an electric assist motor driving the right rear wheel to help in hill climbing or to get across intersections quickly.
           
          When we first began, neither Josh (my grandson) nor I thought we would end up learning so much more about bicycles and tricycles than we ever imagined, but that was part of the fun too.
           
          For an escape hobby, I highly recommend blacksmithing! When you get stressed, you can build huge fires ... so hot that they'll singe the hair off your arms from 10 feet away! And then you get to pound the hell out of a poor defenseless pieces of metal ... and you never have to tell anyone that you named them after some (or all) the people in your life. LOL.
           
          One last thought ... (oops! I hope it's not my last one!) ... I wish everyone a blessed and joyous holiday!
           
          ... Gus
           
           
           
           
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Friday, December 19, 2008 9:17 PM
          Subject: RE: [mlathemods] new member

          > Ok, I just joined and want to say hello and that I'm a real live
          > human being and not a spammer. I'm a retired, disabled veteran of
          > Vietnam, living in Balch Springs, Texas (just outside Dallas). I'll
          > be 61 in January and although I've always wanted to get into
          > machining, I've never before had the time or money. I still don't own
          > a lathe or milling machine, but plan on buying a lathe in about 2
          > months. Gotta pay for Christmas first .... Right now, I'm leaning
          > toward the Grizzly 11x26 lathe since that's the biggest lathe that I
          > have room for and I'm real curious about making a tumbler reverse for
          > it, among other things.
          >
          > I was once a system's analyst, programmer, etc. etc. etc. but my
          > hobbies up to now have been woodworking, blacksmithing and welding.
          > Last year, one of my grandsons and I built a prototype recumbent
          > tricycle (http://www.flickr. com/photos/ gusrod1948/ 3102177044/) and we
          > will be using the lathe and milling machine to make custom parts for
          > what my grandson hopes will turn into a business for him.
          >
          > I've used a lathe before, in a high school metal working shop class,
          > MANY years ago and I'm excited about the prospect of setting up my
          > own home shop.
          >
          > ... Gus Rodriguez
          > My motto:
          > If some is good, more is better and too much is just enough!

          Your spelling is too good to be a spammer.

          You need a pipe bender, that'll give you cool curves, less cutting &
          welding, plus the opportunity to swear at something else. On the trikes,
          don't people usually have the pedals a bit lower to help with stability?
          Neat project, reminds me of when my father decided to build a side-cart for
          my bicycle. That's harder than it looks.

          What are you planning on making?

          Lathe-wise, you're thinking a bit bigger than I was, I've settled for the
          7x12 (plus an X2 mini-mill). The 7x12 actually has tumbler gears, a bit odd
          for a small cheap lathe. If you CNC it, you can skip the tumbler gears.
          Have a look a www.mini-lathe. com, this page -
          http://www.mini- lathe.com/ Mini_lathe/ Versions/ Versions_ 9x20.htm talks about
          adding tumbler gears.

          Don't forget your tooling is going to be about what the lathe cost you,
          you'll be needing carbide bits, 4-jaw chucks, quick change tool post,
          misters, indicators, and if you're anything like me you'll suddenly decide
          collets are a good idea.

          I need a hobby to get away from my hobby. I wonder if women are cheaper.

          Tony

        • Andrew Franks
          Hi Gus, My 7x12 lathe (not a Seig product) came with no way of reversing the leadscrew, apart from reversing the motor, which means that the spindle goes
          Message 4 of 17 , Dec 20, 2008
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            Hi Gus,

            My 7x12 lathe (not a Seig product) came with no way of reversing the
            leadscrew, apart from reversing the motor, which means that the
            spindle goes backwards, too. I thought about a tumbler, but settled
            in the end for simply fixing an idler gear between the spindle gear
            and the first changewheel, when needed. Not as convenient as a
            tumbler, but I reckoned I would already be messing around with
            changewheels on the banjo on the rare occasions when I set up for LH
            threading. So, it wouldn't be too much trouble to fit an extra idler
            at the same time. I put it on an arm, to swing in and out of position
            as required, rather than screwing its mounting stud in and out of the
            headstock, but that was only so I don't lose it.

            Of course, if you need to reverse on a regular basis, a tumbler would
            be very worthwhile.

            Andy.


            --- "Augustine Rodriguez" <gusrod1948@...> wrote:
            >
            .... Right now, I'm leaning toward the Grizzly 11x26 lathe since
            that's the biggest lathe that I have room for and I'm real curious
            about making a tumbler reverse for it, among other things....
            >
          • oldstudentmsgt
            Good Grief, Tony, no! ;) But if you own a lathe and mill, you can sometimes keep them happier with you without a great deal of money. Gus, Welcome. I m about a
            Message 5 of 17 , Dec 20, 2008
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              Good Grief, Tony, no! ;)

              But if you own a lathe and mill, you can sometimes keep them happier
              with you without a great deal of money.

              Gus, Welcome. I'm about a decade younger than you, and don't build
              bikes, and am retired Air Force, but I've gotten a 7x10 HF model 93212,
              and an old Atlas MF horizontal mill to play with. My most complex
              project so far has been blade guides for the old Craftsman bandsaw I'm
              fixing to use in my workshop. Not much time to play, and the workshop
              was a crammed-full storage room with leaky walls at the beginning of
              the summer, still difficult to walk through, but I've found a second
              horizontal surface. I think it might be a workbench. Excavation
              continues!

              Bill in OKC

              --- In mlathemods@yahoogroups.com, "Tony Smith" <ajsmith@...> wrote:
              I need a hobby to get away from my hobby. I wonder if women are cheaper.

              Tony
            • Andrew Franks
              There are indeed many recipes around for tumbler reverse mechanisms, Norman. But I m both inexperienced and lazy, and my simple approach was easier to make. It
              Message 6 of 17 , Dec 20, 2008
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                There are indeed many recipes around for tumbler reverse mechanisms,
                Norman. But I'm both inexperienced and lazy, and my simple approach
                was easier to make. It takes about 30 seconds to set up, provided I
                can lay my hands on the right Allen key :) I use it so infrequently
                that the time spent in making a proper tumbler would take many years
                to recoup.
                Further, my lathe was under warranty at the time, and my solution
                didn't involve drilling/tapping any new holes in it.

                You're right about speeds. My Warco-badged Weiss 7x12 is belt driven,
                and a smaller motor pulley has slowed it down. Though the minimum
                usable rpm is now around 70, a spindle handcrank eliminates the drama
                when screwcutting up to a shoulder. Also surprisingly effective when
                parting off, as I found when a stall halfway through blew the fuse,
                and I didn't have a replacement to hand.

                Andy


                --- In mlathemods@yahoogroups.com, "Norman Atkinson" <norman@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > Andrew,
                > Reversing one of these Chinky lathes is pretty ancient
                stuff.
                > I knew of the Model Engineer articles but thought- hmmm?
                > One answer is here in the files section for the 9x20 lathes.
                >
                > Somewhere in the Model Engineer is a set of articles on how to drop
                > the speeds. Buggering about with nothing lower than 100 rpm and
                this
                > translates to 130rpm for us Brits is a recipe for nervous
                breakdowns-
                > and broken tools.
                >
                > Lathemods could be full such things. I had a 9180 which was one
                with
                > Myford chucks etc- and I fitted it with an auxiliary table to take
                a
                > George Thomas rear parting off tool post and a vertical slide and
                > vice and a small dividing head.
                >
                > It's only a matter of using the information which is still
                available.
                >
                > Cheers
                >
                > Norman
                >
              • Gus Rodriguez
                Hi Lee, Yeah, you got some really nice stuff. I ll probably do something similar when I get the chance. I ve been wanting to upgrade the handwheels on my table
                Message 7 of 17 , Dec 20, 2008
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                  Hi Lee,
                   
                  Yeah, you got some really nice stuff. I'll probably do something similar when I get the chance. I've been wanting to upgrade the handwheels on my table saw and radial saw, but the one I really want to do is to rebuild the table on my bandsaw with a wormdrive or rack to give me a fine adjustment. I'm still waiting till after the holidays to get my lathe and milling machine, but don't get me wrong ... I've got almost everything else a man could want! LOL. Oh, and everyone calls me "Gus". Thanks.
                   
                  ... Gus
                   
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Lee
                  Sent: Friday, December 19, 2008 9:21 PM
                  Subject: [mlathemods] Re: new member

                  Hi Augustine,

                  I was just brousing through my many posts of yahoo groups and read
                  your comments I really liked your tricycle very invetive you should do
                  well when you get your equiptment btw don't forget to get a band saw
                  your shoulder and arm will say thanks. you can see some of my projects
                  on thelinks below if you have'nt joined these groups you should so
                  look around and tell me what you think.

                • Gus Rodriguez
                  Hey Bill, Thanks, I got a chuckle out of that one! I know what you mean. The ole lady decided to convert the garage into a diningroom a couple of years ago
                  Message 8 of 17 , Dec 20, 2008
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                    Hey Bill,
                     
                    Thanks, I got a chuckle out of that one! I know what you mean. The ole' lady decided to convert the garage into a diningroom a couple of years ago and ended up piling everything else into an 8x10 storage shed. I tore down the shed and built a 10x16 workshop with a 10x10 loft but still do a lot of my stuff outside. My smithy is outdoors, next to my shop (which is where I want it anyway), but it includes a small covered area for my chopsaw, a worktable and my anvil. Only the forge (covered with it's own hood) and my quenching vats are completely outside. Then my welding is done on the patio, under a porch for adequate ventilation and so is my table saw, although I can roll it into the shed for storage or bad weather when I want to, but it takes up a lot of floor space. The radial saw is inside the workshop, along with the bandsaw and fullsize drill press. I store my welders and air compressor in the workshop, along with almost every kind of portable powertool you can think of. When I get the lathe and milling machine in the near future, I plan on adding another small room (8x10?) to the end of the existing shed. It will probably be a bit cramped, but I should still be able to get around behind the machines when I need to. The biggest problem I foresee is that with a 500 pound lathe and 700 pound milling machine, I won't have any way of getting them inside ... so I will literally have to build the room around them! More fun!
                     
                    The old lady still works but when she retires in a few years we're thinking of moving out to the country, where I'll be able to build a proper workshop (20x40 with a loft for storage sounds good).
                     
                    ... Gus
                     
                     
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    Sent: Saturday, December 20, 2008 8:36 AM
                    Subject: [mlathemods] Re: new member

                    Good Grief, Tony, no! ;)

                    But if you own a lathe and mill, you can sometimes keep them happier
                    with you without a great deal of money.

                    Gus, Welcome. I'm about a decade younger than you, and don't build
                    bikes, and am retired Air Force, but I've gotten a 7x10 HF model 93212,
                    and an old Atlas MF horizontal mill to play with. My most complex
                    project so far has been blade guides for the old Craftsman bandsaw I'm
                    fixing to use in my workshop. Not much time to play, and the workshop
                    was a crammed-full storage room with leaky walls at the beginning of
                    the summer, still difficult to walk through, but I've found a second
                    horizontal surface. I think it might be a workbench. Excavation
                    continues!

                    Bill in OKC

                    --- In mlathemods@yahoogro ups.com, "Tony Smith" <ajsmith@... > wrote:
                    I need a hobby to get away from my hobby. I wonder if women are cheaper.

                    Tony

                  • Gus Rodriguez
                    Thanks for the insight, Andy. Yes, I will need one on a regular basis. On tricycles with nuts holding the wheel hubs to the axles, the right side has a
                    Message 9 of 17 , Dec 20, 2008
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                      Thanks for the insight, Andy. Yes, I will need one on a regular basis. On tricycles with nuts holding the wheel hubs to the axles, the right side has a  right hand thread, where the wheel rotation acts to tighten the nut but the other side needs to be left hand threaded to work the same way. In my latest design, a solid, oversize axle of approximately 19mm is mounted to the chassis via the suspension system (springs) and is unsupported on the outside of the wheel, so only one nut is required on the outboard side of each rear wheel.
                       
                      In ideal circumstances, the wheel should rotate freely on it's bearings with no thrust to the retaining nut, but if the bearing drags, it could work the nut loose with disastrous results.
                       
                      I can hardly wait!  I can already see the chips curling off in my dreams at night! LOL.
                       
                      ... Gus

                      --- On Sat, 12/20/08, Andrew Franks <andyf1108@...> wrote:
                      From: Andrew Franks <andyf1108@...>
                      Subject: [mlathemods] Re: new member
                      To: mlathemods@yahoogroups.com
                      Date: Saturday, December 20, 2008, 5:42 AM

                      Hi Gus,

                      My 7x12 lathe (not a Seig product) came with no way of reversing the
                      leadscrew, apart from reversing the motor, which means that the
                      spindle goes backwards, too. I thought about a tumbler, but settled
                      in the end for simply fixing an idler gear between the spindle gear
                      and the first changewheel, when needed. Not as convenient as a
                      tumbler, but I reckoned I would already be messing around with
                      changewheels on the banjo on the rare occasions when I set up for LH
                      threading. So, it wouldn't be too much trouble to fit an extra idler
                      at the same time. I put it on an arm, to swing in and out of position
                      as required, rather than screwing its mounting stud in and out of the
                      headstock, but that was only so I don't lose it.

                      Of course, if you need to reverse on a regular basis, a tumbler would
                      be very worthwhile.

                      Andy.

                      --- "Augustine Rodriguez" <gusrod1948@ ...> wrote:
                      >
                      .... Right now, I'm leaning toward the Grizzly 11x26 lathe since
                      that's the biggest lathe that I have room for and I'm real curious
                      about making a tumbler reverse for it, among other things....
                      >

                    • Capt. Lee
                      Ok Gus, Well We Machinest want to see the pictures of your new equipment so hope you get a digital camera for xmas to take those pics for us foryou to share on
                      Message 10 of 17 , Dec 20, 2008
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                        Ok Gus, Well We Machinest want to see the pictures of your new equipment so hope you get a digital camera for xmas to take those pics for us foryou to share on the grups page.  Cap

                        Cap..
                         
                         
                        Don't Give Up The Ship..!!!!!!!
                         

                      • Gus Rodriguez
                        Sure, Cap. I wore out the megapixels in my last one. I think it still has one or two pixels left, but that s about it! If no one gives me one, I ll buy it
                        Message 11 of 17 , Dec 20, 2008
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                          Sure, Cap.
                           
                          I wore out the megapixels in my last one. I think it still has one or two pixels left, but that's about it! If no one gives me one, I'll buy it myself. I've been wanting to take pics of my entire shop layout to show that you can indeed work in a closet. All you gotta do is hold your breath long enough to get things done.
                           
                          Christmas is an expensive proposition for me. I had five kids and from those kids I have 17 grandkids and 5 great grandkids!
                          In my house, Santa's gotta wait till AFTER Christmas to get his toys ... but that's ok ... mine cost more!
                           
                          ... Gus
                           
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: Capt. Lee
                          Sent: Saturday, December 20, 2008 3:06 PM
                          Subject: Re: [mlathemods] Re: new member

                          Ok Gus, Well We Machinest want to see the pictures of your new equipment so hope you get a digital camera for xmas to take those pics for us foryou to share on the grups page.  Cap

                          Cap..
                           
                           
                          Don't Give Up The Ship..!!!!!! !
                           

                        • Tony Smith
                          ... Yeah, I m not that naïve. :) Reminds me of a thread on another list, where I said building something (CNC drill press for circuit boards) can save you
                          Message 12 of 17 , Dec 21, 2008
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                            > Good Grief, Tony, no! ;)
                            >
                            > But if you own a lathe and mill, you can sometimes keep them happier
                            > with you without a great deal of money.


                            Yeah, I'm not that naïve. :)

                            Reminds me of a thread on another list, where I said building something (CNC
                            drill press for circuit boards) can save you cash, meaning...

                            > > The money you save can be spent on better
                            > > things, like booze, hookers and blackjack.

                            Back came a response:

                            > Check out another yahoo group "homedistillers"
                            > and quit gambling then you can have extra
                            > money left over and you can pay the hookers
                            > to drill your PCBs for you :D

                            Wise words, there's a man who's thought things thru!

                            Tony
                          • rebmc@verizon.net
                            I am a new member, not a spammer. Micro Lux 7X14 and Mini mill
                            Message 13 of 17 , Dec 27, 2008
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                              I am a new member, not a spammer. Micro Lux 7X14 and Mini mill
                            • oldstudentmsgt
                              Welcome, not-a-spammer. Got anything else you d prefer we call you? ;) Bill in OKC
                              Message 14 of 17 , Dec 28, 2008
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                                Welcome, not-a-spammer. Got anything else you'd prefer we call you? ;)


                                Bill in OKC
                              • rebmc@verizon.net
                                I could say happily divorced since I can spent on my tooling instead of supporting walmart Dec 28, 2008 03:49:38 PM, mlathemods@yahoogroups.com wrote: Welcome,
                                Message 15 of 17 , Dec 28, 2008
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                                  I could say happily divorced since I can spent on my tooling instead of supporting walmart


                                  Dec 28, 2008 03:49:38 PM, mlathemods@yahoogroups.com wrote:

                                  Welcome, not-a-spammer. Got anything else you'd prefer we call you? ;)

                                  Bill in OKC

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