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Lathe for 5C Collets?

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  • Brooke Clarke
    Hi: I m looking into getting a lathe, as small as possible, but that will take 5C collets in the same way as the Hardinge, i.e. with the collet closing lever
    Message 1 of 19 , Nov 4, 2007
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      Hi:

      I'm looking into getting a lathe, as small as possible, but that will take 5C
      collets in the same way as the Hardinge, i.e. with the collet closing lever to
      the left of the headstock allowing material feed through the headstock.
      http://www.hardingeus.com/index.asp?pageID=63&prodID=29
      http://hardinge.com/usr/pdf/turning/1332A_HLV.pdf
      Is there a made in China version?

      --
      Have Fun,

      Brooke Clarke
      http://www.PRC68.com
      http://www.precisionclock.com
      http://www.prc68.com/I/WebCam2.shtml 24/7 Sky-Weather-Astronomy Cam
    • James W. Early
      Enco and several others import a china version of the HLV, but it is still around 10 grand at least. For 5C in the spindle you need a 1-3/8 spindle bore for
      Message 2 of 19 , Nov 5, 2007
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        Enco and several others import a china version of the HLV, but it is still around 10 grand at least. For 5C in the spindle you need a 1-3/8" spindle bore for the gear to fit and that usually means a 5MT taper. This will mean on the average a 12x36 lathe which is available from several suppliers starting around 2 grand plus another grand for the closer. If you do not need that much spindle and can get away with a 3/4" or 20mm spindle bore there are several nose mount 5C chucks that will fit any of the low end 9" or so machines giving the that capability. Yes the HLV is a nice machine if you have the money and room for one, if you do not there are a range of other options to give 5C capability on a wide range of smaller lathes.
        --
        JWE
        Long Beach, CA


        -------------- Original message ----------------------
        From: Brooke Clarke <brooke@...>
        >
        > Hi:
        >
        > I'm looking into getting a lathe, as small as possible, but that will take 5C
        > collets in the same way as the Hardinge, i.e. with the collet closing lever to
        > the left of the headstock allowing material feed through the headstock.
        > http://www.hardingeus.com/index.asp?pageID=63&prodID=29
        > http://hardinge.com/usr/pdf/turning/1332A_HLV.pdf
        > Is there a made in China version?
        >
        > --
        > Have Fun,
        >
        > Brooke Clarke
        > http://www.PRC68.com
        > http://www.precisionclock.com
        > http://www.prc68.com/I/WebCam2.shtml 24/7 Sky-Weather-Astronomy Cam
        >
        >
      • Kenneth Emmert
        Hi: I m looking into getting a lathe, as small as possible, but that will take 5C collets in the same way as the Hardinge, i.e. with the collet closing lever
        Message 3 of 19 , Nov 6, 2007
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          Hi:

          I'm looking into getting a lathe, as small as possible, but that will take 5C
          collets in the same way as the Hardinge, i.e. with the collet closing lever to
          the left of the headstock allowing material feed through the headstock.

           

          One choice could be a Grizzley 12 x 36 lathe 2k and collet closer about $350.00.  While movement is 10 x 20 with the Hardinge Lathe, it is not small in weight at about 3,000 lbs.  A great lathe for production; there are similar Chinese made tool room lathes available at 8 to 12,000 price. 

          I to have been hunting this Lathe form except I need a turret version.  It looks like I may end up with a Simmons #2 turret.  Lathe was built in the fifties and Weighs 4,000 plus pounds with a 3 horse motor.  A used market pickup for $800, unfortunately  used Lathes are a major time investment in cleaning and setting up.   A long with the joys of moving a 4,000 lb piece of equipment 120 miles; teamed with potential cost surprises in repairs. 

          Though in many ways I find working and on these pieces of history much more satisfying than a new machine tool purchase.

           

          Just don’t drop one on your foot!

           

          Ken

          Kenneth A. Emmert

          SMW Precision LLC

          866-533-9016 (Toll Free)

        • James W. Early
          Ken You might want to evaluate what your needs are down the line. For instance as far as turret tooling goes there have been a large selection made, I have one
          Message 4 of 19 , Nov 6, 2007
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            Ken
            You might want to evaluate what your needs are down the line. For instance as far as turret tooling goes there have been a large selection made, I have one for my 9" south Bend. There is also the tailstock taper mounted six tool turret for drilling or reaming. There are also the Hardinge speed lathes that can be picked up from $300 to $3000 from tooling dealers that usually come with a bed turret. I have several bed turret designs from a jewelers size to one that could be adapted to home construction to almost any lathe.

            With a nose mount collet closer, production cross slide and the bed turret my South Bend can do most any job a Hardinge speed lathe can and it also has power feeds and threading that they do not. Shop with care and you might be able to put together a workable set of machine and tooling that might surprise you. Enco used to supply bed turrets aftermarket to order and they were made to fit a wide variety of machines. The back rooms of machinery dealers sometimes reveal gold priced as dross to the one who looks through the grunge.

            My bed turret cost $50 in 1976 when I found it on the bottom shelf of a dealers junk pile. It had been mounted to an adapter plate badly to go on a larger lathe and would not work right. The height and way spacing looked right for my machine so I bought it for scrap. It fits and works great, the adaptor to the larger lathe was poorly made, but the turret except for a little rust was as new and works great.
            --
            JWE
            Long Beach, CA




            -------------- Original message ----------------------
            From: "Kenneth Emmert" <mds1878@...>
            >
            > Hi:
            >
            > I'm looking into getting a lathe, as small as possible, but that will take
            > 5C
            > collets in the same way as the Hardinge, i.e. with the collet closing lever
            > to
            > the left of the headstock allowing material feed through the headstock.
            >
            >
            >
            > One choice could be a Grizzley 12 x 36 lathe 2k and collet closer about
            > $350.00. While movement is 10 x 20 with the Hardinge Lathe, it is not small
            > in weight at about 3,000 lbs. A great lathe for production; there are
            > similar Chinese made tool room lathes available at 8 to 12,000 price.
            >
            > I to have been hunting this Lathe form except I need a turret version. It
            > looks like I may end up with a Simmons #2 turret. Lathe was built in the
            > fifties and Weighs 4,000 plus pounds with a 3 horse motor. A used market
            > pickup for $800, unfortunately used Lathes are a major time investment in
            > cleaning and setting up. A long with the joys of moving a 4,000 lb piece
            > of equipment 120 miles; teamed with potential cost surprises in repairs.
            >
            > Though in many ways I find working and on these pieces of history much more
            > satisfying than a new machine tool purchase.
            >
            >
            >
            > Just don't drop one on your foot!
            >
            >
            >
            > Ken
            >
            > Kenneth A. Emmert
            >
            > SMW Precision LLC
            >
            > 866-533-9016 (Toll Free)
            >
          • Brooke Clarke
            Hi JWE & Ken: Thanks, I see it s out of my price range to get a big lathe and too difficult to try and find a used one. What about using the 5C collet holder,
            Message 5 of 19 , Nov 6, 2007
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              Hi JWE & Ken:

              Thanks, I see it's out of my price range to get a big lathe and too difficult
              to try and find a used one.

              What about using the 5C collet holder, like sold by Little Machine shop. They
              have a table of lathes and the smallest of those is the 9x20 like the Harbor
              Freight 45861. But the holder has a 5" diameter and should fit the mini
              lathes, but maybe there's not enough bed length for tooling? Are there scale
              drawings of the different Seig mini lathes on line?
              http://www.prc68.com/I/MMT.shtml <- my homework on mini lathes

              My memory is hazy on how material was fed through the head stock on the
              Hardinge "chucker". The machinist seemed to just pump the turret with his
              right hand and every now and then cycle the chuck with his left. There may
              have been a lever operated cross slide with a cutoff tool on one side and
              another (upside-down?) tool on the other side. But that would mean the rod
              stock was spinning to the left of the lathe which does not sound correct. Is
              there a way to avoid that?

              My use is to make brass or aluminum parts in small quantity for prototypes.
              There's a local fully automated shop that does production but it's very
              expensive for them to setup an automatic machine to make one part. An example
              of production parts are the 5BA and 90BA battery adapters:
              http://www.prc68.com/P/5BA.html
              http://www.prc68.com/P/90BA.html

              Wouldn't you know Enco has a 24 piece 5C set on sale ($110) plus free shipping
              on anything through the end of the year when you use the code HFSP27
              http://specialoffer.use-enco.com/ct/2211037:2137104517:m:1:165091714:94598EBADF11320179CE584D9076D373

              JWE can you say more about coil winding. It's one of the things I'd like to do.

              --
              Have Fun,

              Brooke Clarke
              http://www.PRC68.com
              http://www.precisionclock.com
              http://www.prc68.com/I/WebCam2.shtml 24/7 Sky-Weather-Astronomy Cam
            • Brooke Clarke
              Hi again: While surfing the Enco web pages I came across the Turn-Pro Second Operation Lathe that sure looks like the Hardinge including the turret and lever
              Message 6 of 19 , Nov 6, 2007
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                Hi again:

                While surfing the Enco web pages I came across the "Turn-Pro Second Operation
                Lathe" that sure looks like the Hardinge including the turret and lever
                operated cross slide. The name "second operation" also answers my question
                about bar stock on the left. I think the small parts were inserted into the
                collet and moved up against a stop on the turret and the collet closed. Then a
                series of operations were done using the turret and/or cross slide. But $10k
                is a bit too much.
                http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INPDFF?PMPAGE=419&PMCTLG=00

                It seems they have a number of collet sets on sale, not just the one in the
                promo email.
                http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INLMK3?PMK0NO=860106

                --
                Have Fun,

                Brooke Clarke
                http://www.PRC68.com
                http://www.precisionclock.com
                http://www.prc68.com/I/WebCam2.shtml 24/7 Sky-Weather-Astronomy Cam
              • Peter DiVergilio
                The stock is usually fed through an air-operated tubular holder on the left of the headstock (for smaller lengths). When the Collet closer is opened, air
                Message 7 of 19 , Nov 6, 2007
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                  The stock is usually fed through an air-operated tubular holder on the left of the headstock (for smaller lengths).
                  When the Collet closer is opened, air pressure feeds a piston at the back end of the stock. There is a stop mounted
                  at the front of the chucker (or turret) to give the proper length of feed.
                  Longer lengths are supported as necessary by external supports.
                  Pete DiVergilio
                  never approach a goat from the front, a horse from the rear, or a fool from any direction.
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Tuesday, November 06, 2007 2:32 PM
                  Subject: [mlathemods] Re: Lathe for 5C Collets?

                  Hi JWE & Ken:

                  Thanks, I see it's out of my price range to get a big lathe and too difficult
                  to try and find a used one.

                  What about using the 5C collet holder, like sold by Little Machine shop. They
                  have a table of lathes and the smallest of those is the 9x20 like the Harbor
                  Freight 45861. But the holder has a 5" diameter and should fit the mini
                  lathes, but maybe there's not enough bed length for tooling? Are there scale
                  drawings of the different Seig mini lathes on line?
                  http://www.prc68. com/I/MMT shtml <- my homework on mini lathes

                  My memory is hazy on how material was fed through the head stock on the
                  Hardinge "chucker". The machinist seemed to just pump the turret with his
                  right hand and every now and then cycle the chuck with his left. There may
                  have been a lever operated cross slide with a cutoff tool on one side and
                  another (upside-down? ) tool on the other side. But that would mean the rod
                  stock was spinning to the left of the lathe which does not sound correct. Is
                  there a way to avoid that?

                  My use is to make brass or aluminum parts in small quantity for prototypes.
                  There's a local fully automated shop that does production but it's very
                  expensive for them to setup an automatic machine to make one part. An example
                  of production parts are the 5BA and 90BA battery adapters:
                  http://www.prc68. com/P/5BA. html
                  http://www.prc68. com/P/90BA. html

                  Wouldn't you know Enco has a 24 piece 5C set on sale ($110) plus free shipping
                  on anything through the end of the year when you use the code HFSP27
                  http://specialoffer .use-enco. com/ct/2211037: 2137104517: m:1:165091714: 94598EBADF113201 79CE584D9076D373

                  JWE can you say more about coil winding. It's one of the things I'd like to do.

                  --
                  Have Fun,

                  Brooke Clarke
                  http://www.PRC68. com
                  http://www.precisio nclock.com
                  http://www.prc68. com/I/WebCam2. shtml 24/7 Sky-Weather- Astronomy Cam

                • Brian Pitt
                  ... have you tried ebay every now and then a speed lathe turns up if you add the long table and extended base from a micromill to this one item number:
                  Message 8 of 19 , Nov 6, 2007
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                    On Sunday 04 November 2007 23:56, Brooke Clarke wrote:
                    > I'm looking into getting a lathe, as small as possible, but that will take 5C
                    > collets in the same way as the Hardinge,

                    have you tried ebay
                    every now and then a speed lathe turns up
                    if you add the long table and extended base from a micromill to this one
                    item number: 320166840307
                    and CNC it you'd have a decent (but kinda slow) gang tooled chucker

                    or maybe slap this on a 7x12 bed
                    Item number: 160175351369

                    Brian
                    --
                    "Nemo me impune lacesset"
                  • James W. Early
                    Using that type of collet holder is possible on a milling machine or drill press, but does not work very well in the lathe. How do I know, I tried it with very
                    Message 9 of 19 , Nov 7, 2007
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                      Using that type of collet holder is possible on a milling machine or drill press, but does not work very well in the lathe. How do I know, I tried it with very unsatisfactory results.

                      The nose mount collet chuck kit here can be adapted to virtually any 7 to 10 inch swing lathe and will produce results comparable to a built in one. I am fairly close to making an adaption of this design as a nose mount lever actuated unit for production use.

                      http://www.sc-c.com/metallathe/MLA21.html

                      Bar can be fed from the left but you need a support tube to keep it from wrapping itself around everything else and beating it to death when it starts whipping and bends. Go to the below web site and search on coil winding, he has done a lot of it and can give good and useful advice on a lot of exotoric items.

                      http://www.logwell.com/
                      --
                      JWE
                      Long Beach, CA


                      -------------- Original message ----------------------
                      From: Brooke Clarke <brooke@...>
                      >
                      > Hi JWE & Ken:
                      >
                      > Thanks, I see it's out of my price range to get a big lathe and too difficult
                      > to try and find a used one.
                      >
                      > What about using the 5C collet holder, like sold by Little Machine shop. They
                      > have a table of lathes and the smallest of those is the 9x20 like the Harbor
                      > Freight 45861. But the holder has a 5" diameter and should fit the mini
                      > lathes, but maybe there's not enough bed length for tooling? Are there scale
                      > drawings of the different Seig mini lathes on line?
                      > http://www.prc68.com/I/MMT.shtml <- my homework on mini lathes
                      >
                      > My memory is hazy on how material was fed through the head stock on the
                      > Hardinge "chucker". The machinist seemed to just pump the turret with his
                      > right hand and every now and then cycle the chuck with his left. There may
                      > have been a lever operated cross slide with a cutoff tool on one side and
                      > another (upside-down?) tool on the other side. But that would mean the rod
                      > stock was spinning to the left of the lathe which does not sound correct. Is
                      > there a way to avoid that?
                      >
                      > My use is to make brass or aluminum parts in small quantity for prototypes.
                      > There's a local fully automated shop that does production but it's very
                      > expensive for them to setup an automatic machine to make one part. An example
                      > of production parts are the 5BA and 90BA battery adapters:
                      > http://www.prc68.com/P/5BA.html
                      > http://www.prc68.com/P/90BA.html
                      >
                      > Wouldn't you know Enco has a 24 piece 5C set on sale ($110) plus free shipping
                      > on anything through the end of the year when you use the code HFSP27
                      > http://specialoffer.use-enco.com/ct/2211037:2137104517:m:1:165091714:94598EBADF1
                      > 1320179CE584D9076D373
                      >
                      > JWE can you say more about coil winding. It's one of the things I'd like to do.
                      >
                      > --
                      > Have Fun,
                      >
                      > Brooke Clarke
                      > http://www.PRC68.com
                      > http://www.precisionclock.com
                      > http://www.prc68.com/I/WebCam2.shtml 24/7 Sky-Weather-Astronomy Cam
                    • Kenneth Emmert
                      Ken You might want to evaluate what your needs are down the line. For instance as far as turret tooling goes there have been a large selection made, I have one
                      Message 10 of 19 , Nov 7, 2007
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                        Ken
                        You might want to evaluate what your needs are down the line. For instance as far as turret tooling goes there have been a large selection made, I have one for my 9" south Bend. There is also the tailstock taper mounted six tool turret for drilling or reaming. There are also the Hardinge speed lathes that can be picked up from $300 to $3000 from tooling dealers that usually come with a bed turret. I have several bed turret designs from a jewelers size to one that could be adapted to home construction to almost any lathe.

                        JWE you are a kind and knowledgeable man.  I agree with your comments in general, unfortunately a tool room lathe acquisition is for a production process.  My standard 12 x 37”  Lathe using a ¾” turret is under powered and not likely to hold up to the long term abuse.   It is a well built 22 year old Grizzley that has some major advantages over current 12 x 37 Lathe models heavier and better build.  I know the risks in old machine tools and how to check and adjust most things.  Usual problem I know more than enough to get myself into trouble and nearly enough to get out of it.

                         

                        Thanks,

                         

                        Ken

                        Kenneth A. Emmert

                        SMW Precision LLC

                        866-533-9016 (Toll Free)

                      • jimonkka
                        Have you looked at the 3C collet? Little Machine Shop carries all the pieces to outfit a 7x. I believe it is cheaper than getting a larger lathe. Slightly
                        Message 11 of 19 , Nov 10, 2007
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                          Have you looked at the 3C collet? Little Machine Shop carries all
                          the pieces to outfit a 7x. I believe it is cheaper than getting a
                          larger lathe. Slightly smaller larger diameter than a 5C. Long stock
                          hanging on the left is controlled by a simple stand to keep from
                          whipping. I believe Little Machine Shop also had one of those but it
                          is easily made.


                          --- In mlathemods@yahoogroups.com, Brooke Clarke <brooke@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Hi:
                          >
                          > I'm looking into getting a lathe, as small as possible, but that
                          will take 5C
                          > collets in the same way as the Hardinge, i.e. with the collet
                          closing lever to
                          > the left of the headstock allowing material feed through the
                          headstock.
                          > http://www.hardingeus.com/index.asp?pageID=63&prodID=29
                          > http://hardinge.com/usr/pdf/turning/1332A_HLV.pdf
                          > Is there a made in China version?
                          >
                          > --
                          > Have Fun,
                          >
                          > Brooke Clarke
                          > http://www.PRC68.com
                          > http://www.precisionclock.com
                          > http://www.prc68.com/I/WebCam2.shtml 24/7 Sky-Weather-Astronomy
                          Cam
                          >
                        • Troy Burns
                          In most cases, material going through the headstock can best be controlled by a spider . See Lynn Standish s website for details.
                          Message 12 of 19 , Nov 10, 2007
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                            In most cases, material going through the headstock can best be
                            controlled by a 'spider'. See Lynn Standish's website for
                            details. http://warhammer.mcc.virginia.edu/ty/7x10/standish.html

                            I made my spider before I learned to cut inside threads, so I
                            inletted the outside lock nut into the through hole, achieving a
                            press fit, then used screws and epoxy to hold it in place. I had to
                            trim the plastic panel on the left end of the lathe for clearance.

                            With a 4 jaw chuck and 4 bolts into the spider, I'm able to set up a
                            gun barrel to about .0002" clearance on both ends of the headstock.

                            tb
                          • Brooke Clarke
                            Hi Cam: That s an interesting option. LMS offers a set of 7 each 3C collets:
                            Message 13 of 19 , Nov 10, 2007
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                              Hi Cam:

                              That's an interesting option. LMS offers a set of 7 each 3C collets:
                              http://www.littlemachineshop.com/products/product_view.php?ProductID=1991&category=-195207565

                              But although Enco carries page after page of collets they don't seem to carry
                              3C but do have a 3J. The main reason I was looking for 5C is the huge
                              selection of ready made collets for round, square, hex, and blank for very
                              reasonable prices.

                              Are there sources for 3C other than LMS?

                              Have Fun,

                              Brooke Clarke
                              http://www.PRC68.com
                              http://www.precisionclock.com
                              http://www.prc68.com/I/WebCam2.shtml 24/7 Sky-Weather-Astronomy Cam


                              jimonkka wrote:
                              > Have you looked at the 3C collet? Little Machine Shop carries all
                              > the pieces to outfit a 7x. I believe it is cheaper than getting a
                              > larger lathe. Slightly smaller larger diameter than a 5C. Long stock
                              > hanging on the left is controlled by a simple stand to keep from
                              > whipping. I believe Little Machine Shop also had one of those but it
                              > is easily made.
                              >
                              >
                              > --- In mlathemods@yahoogroups.com, Brooke Clarke <brooke@...> wrote:
                              >
                              >>Hi:
                              >>
                              >>I'm looking into getting a lathe, as small as possible, but that
                              >
                              > will take 5C
                              >
                              >>collets in the same way as the Hardinge, i.e. with the collet
                              >
                              > closing lever to
                              >
                              >>the left of the headstock allowing material feed through the
                              >
                              > headstock.
                              >
                              >>http://www.hardingeus.com/index.asp?pageID=63&prodID=29
                              >>http://hardinge.com/usr/pdf/turning/1332A_HLV.pdf
                              >>Is there a made in China version?
                              >>
                              >>--
                              >>Have Fun,
                              >>
                              >>Brooke Clarke
                              >>http://www.PRC68.com
                              >>http://www.precisionclock.com
                              >>http://www.prc68.com/I/WebCam2.shtml 24/7 Sky-Weather-Astronomy
                              >
                              > Cam
                            • PeterH5322
                              ... 3C is a Hardinge collet. Hardinge sells 3C, 4C and 5C, and possibly some other Cataract (from which comes the C) collets. J is a Sjogren collet, and
                              Message 14 of 19 , Nov 10, 2007
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                                >Are there sources for 3C other than LMS?

                                3C is a Hardinge collet.

                                Hardinge sells 3C, 4C and 5C, and possibly some other "Cataract" (from
                                which comes the C) collets.

                                J is a Sjogren collet, and Hardinge made the Sjogren collet chuck for
                                many years, but it is now made and serviced by ATS Workholding.

                                The best source of first-line collets in C and J series is Hardinge.

                                Rivett used to make Cs and Js.

                                Lyndex as well.
                              • Brian Pitt
                                ... be sure you re sitting down when you look up the prices though ;) http://hardingetooling.com/productcodes.asp?ID=CSERIES also the 3J is a pretty big collet
                                Message 15 of 19 , Nov 10, 2007
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                                  On Saturday 10 November 2007 14:06, PeterH5322 wrote:
                                  > >Are there sources for 3C other than LMS?
                                  >
                                  > 3C is a Hardinge collet.

                                  be sure you're sitting down when you look up the prices though ;)
                                  http://hardingetooling.com/productcodes.asp?ID=CSERIES

                                  also the 3J is a pretty big collet ,it will swallow a 5C
                                  http://cgi.ebay.com/Quick-Change-3J-Collet-Chuck-To-5C-Collets-NEW_W0QQitemZ290068785476QQcmdZViewItem

                                  Brian
                                  --
                                  "Nemo me impune lacesset"
                                • PeterH5322
                                  ... I buy good, used ones, from a local dealer for $7.50 or so. ... I have a 22J Speed-Chuck . Now, THAT S BIG.
                                  Message 16 of 19 , Nov 10, 2007
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                                    >> 3C is a Hardinge collet.
                                    >
                                    >be sure you're sitting down when you look up the prices though ;)

                                    I buy good, used ones, from a local dealer for $7.50 or so.



                                    >also the 3J is a pretty big collet ,it will swallow a 5C

                                    I have a 22J "Speed-Chuck".

                                    Now, THAT'S BIG.
                                  • Brooke Clarke
                                    Hi: I m starting to like the Grizzly G0516 but neither Grizzly nor Little Machine Shop knows what the spindle threads are. I m 99% sure this is a Seig C6, but
                                    Message 17 of 19 , Nov 15, 2007
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                                      Hi:

                                      I'm starting to like the Grizzly G0516 but neither Grizzly nor Little Machine
                                      Shop knows what the spindle threads are. I'm 99% sure this is a Seig C6, but
                                      that doesn't help much. Does anyone know?
                                      http://www.grizzly.com/products/g0516

                                      Have Fun,

                                      Brooke Clarke
                                      http://www.PRC68.com
                                      http://www.precisionclock.com
                                      http://www.prc68.com/I/WebCam2.shtml 24/7 Sky-Weather-Astronomy Cam
                                    • Druid Noibn
                                      Hi Brooke, The lathe uses a flange to attache the chucks. Also, both the lathe and the mill have a MT 3 taper. Take a look at the manuals on the Grizzly site
                                      Message 18 of 19 , Nov 15, 2007
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                                        Hi Brooke,
                                         
                                        The lathe uses a flange to attache the chucks.  Also, both the lathe and the mill have a MT 3 taper.
                                         
                                        Take a look at the manuals on the Grizzly site - far better than most.
                                         
                                        Nice machine, tells us your opinions when you get it.
                                         
                                        Take care,
                                        DBN

                                        Brooke Clarke <brooke@...> wrote:
                                        Hi:

                                        I'm starting to like the Grizzly G0516 but neither Grizzly nor Little Machine
                                        Shop knows what the spindle threads are. I'm 99% sure this is a Seig C6, but
                                        that doesn't help much. Does anyone know?
                                        http://www.grizzly. com/products/ g0516

                                        Have Fun,

                                        Brooke Clarke
                                        http://www.PRC68. com
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                                      • James Eckman
                                        Looking at the parts manual online, it s like the other Chinese lathes. No threads on the spindle, strictly bolt on! Use a collet adapter for a #3 Morse taper?
                                        Message 19 of 19 , Nov 16, 2007
                                        • 0 Attachment
                                          Looking at the parts manual online, it's like the other Chinese lathes.
                                          No threads on the spindle, strictly bolt on! Use a collet adapter for a
                                          #3 Morse taper?

                                          Interesting machine though, reminds me of some of the older Prazi's for
                                          size.

                                          Jim Eckman
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