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FYI

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  • RNH
    James, This may not be the correct group for this post but here goes anyway. In a note concerning gear boxes you mentioned the advantage of a selection of fine
    Message 1 of 10 , Sep 5, 2002
      James, This may not be the correct group for this post but here goes anyway.

      In a note concerning gear boxes you mentioned the advantage of a selection
      of fine feeds being one feature worth having on our lathes. I did not
      realize the truth in your advice until I had a lot of experience using the
      QCGB in the fine feed mode.

      You are so right! Depending on the material being worked on, the shape or
      type of toolbit being used, and of course the overall appearance of the
      finished job, this feature shows it's value very nicely.

      Whether or not we use a QC box, it is information worthy of being repeated,
      especially to rookies like me!

      Thanks once again. Richard
    • j.w.early@worldnet.att.net
      Richard The point I wanted to make in the discussion at that time was that with a QC box on the lathe it is easy and convienent to select the most effective
      Message 2 of 10 , Sep 5, 2002
        Richard
        The point I wanted to make in the discussion at that
        time was that with a QC box on the lathe it is easy and
        convienent to select the most effective feed rate rather
        than the one that was setup at the moment.

        One can then use a coarser, faster feed for roughing out
        the shape and then with a flick of the lever switch to a
        finer, slower feed for the finish cuts. Saves time and
        frustration and because the operator is not half asleep
        from so many slow passes to remove excess material less
        scrap will be produced and so even less frustration.

        Face it QC boxes will make you a more productive and
        happier machinest and maybe even save your marriage.

        JWE
        Long Beach, CA
        > James, This may not be the correct group for this post but here goes anyway.
        >
        > In a note concerning gear boxes you mentioned the advantage of a selection
        > of fine feeds being one feature worth having on our lathes. I did not
        > realize the truth in your advice until I had a lot of experience using the
        > QCGB in the fine feed mode.
        >
        > You are so right! Depending on the material being worked on, the shape or
        > type of toolbit being used, and of course the overall appearance of the
        > finished job, this feature shows it's value very nicely.
        >
        > Whether or not we use a QC box, it is information worthy of being repeated,
        > especially to rookies like me!
        >
        > Thanks once again. Richard
      • paul_probus
        Rich and James, I couldn t agree more with what is said. However, after using a Hardinge (albeit only a few times) I would say that using a feed mechanism
        Message 3 of 10 , Sep 5, 2002
          Rich and James,

          I couldn't agree more with what is said. However, after using a
          Hardinge (albeit only a few times) I would say that using a feed
          mechanism that is infinitely variable (within the upper and lower
          limits of the drive mechanism) is the way to go. The Hardinge feed
          system gives the operator complete freedom over the best feed rate
          which can change as the diameter of the piece is reduced. In
          addition, you won't have to worry about which gear configuration
          you're in to depend on the feed rate you use for a specific cut.
          Another advantage is that the feed mechanism is completely divorced
          form the spindle speed.

          I would rate the QCGB as a very good second choice alternative for a
          feed mechanism. Although there were other factors that contributed
          to it, I had the best machined finishes using that Hardinge than I
          ever had using the old, but extremely rigid and heavy, Hendey lathe
          my dad had, which had a QCGB. Unfotunately, my dad gave away the
          Hendey and I cannot make a direct comparison using the same tool post
          holder, insert tooling, etc. to get a more accurate feel for the
          quality of turnings using a QCGB.

          Paul

          --- In mlathemods@y..., j.w.early@w... wrote:
          > Richard
          > The point I wanted to make in the discussion at that
          > time was that with a QC box on the lathe it is easy and
          > convienent to select the most effective feed rate rather
          > than the one that was setup at the moment.
          >
          > One can then use a coarser, faster feed for roughing out
          > the shape and then with a flick of the lever switch to a
          > finer, slower feed for the finish cuts. Saves time and
          > frustration and because the operator is not half asleep
          > from so many slow passes to remove excess material less
          > scrap will be produced and so even less frustration.
          >
          > Face it QC boxes will make you a more productive and
          > happier machinest and maybe even save your marriage.
          >
          > JWE
          > Long Beach, CA
          > > James, This may not be the correct group for this post but here
          goes anyway.
          > >
          > > In a note concerning gear boxes you mentioned the advantage of a
          selection
          > > of fine feeds being one feature worth having on our lathes. I did
          not
          > > realize the truth in your advice until I had a lot of experience
          using the
          > > QCGB in the fine feed mode.
          > >
          > > You are so right! Depending on the material being worked on, the
          shape or
          > > type of toolbit being used, and of course the overall appearance
          of the
          > > finished job, this feature shows it's value very nicely.
          > >
          > > Whether or not we use a QC box, it is information worthy of being
          repeated,
          > > especially to rookies like me!
          > >
          > > Thanks once again. Richard
        • j.w.early@worldnet.att.net
          Paul Yes but how many can afford to get a Hardinge HLV for their play pen. JWE
          Message 4 of 10 , Sep 5, 2002
            Paul
            Yes but how many can afford to get a Hardinge HLV for
            their play pen.
            JWE
            > Rich and James,
            >
            > I couldn't agree more with what is said. However, after using a
            > Hardinge (albeit only a few times) I would say that using a feed
            > mechanism that is infinitely variable (within the upper and lower
            > limits of the drive mechanism) is the way to go. The Hardinge feed
            > system gives the operator complete freedom over the best feed rate
            > which can change as the diameter of the piece is reduced. In
            > addition, you won't have to worry about which gear configuration
            > you're in to depend on the feed rate you use for a specific cut.
            > Another advantage is that the feed mechanism is completely divorced
            > form the spindle speed.
            >
            > I would rate the QCGB as a very good second choice alternative for a
            > feed mechanism. Although there were other factors that contributed
            > to it, I had the best machined finishes using that Hardinge than I
            > ever had using the old, but extremely rigid and heavy, Hendey lathe
            > my dad had, which had a QCGB. Unfotunately, my dad gave away the
            > Hendey and I cannot make a direct comparison using the same tool post
            > holder, insert tooling, etc. to get a more accurate feel for the
            > quality of turnings using a QCGB.
            >
            > Paul
            >
            > --- In mlathemods@y..., j.w.early@w... wrote:
            > > Richard
            > > The point I wanted to make in the discussion at that
            > > time was that with a QC box on the lathe it is easy and
            > > convienent to select the most effective feed rate rather
            > > than the one that was setup at the moment.
            > >
            > > One can then use a coarser, faster feed for roughing out
            > > the shape and then with a flick of the lever switch to a
            > > finer, slower feed for the finish cuts. Saves time and
            > > frustration and because the operator is not half asleep
            > > from so many slow passes to remove excess material less
            > > scrap will be produced and so even less frustration.
            > >
            > > Face it QC boxes will make you a more productive and
            > > happier machinest and maybe even save your marriage.
            > >
            > > JWE
            > > Long Beach, CA
            > > > James, This may not be the correct group for this post but here
            > goes anyway.
            > > >
            > > > In a note concerning gear boxes you mentioned the advantage of a
            > selection
            > > > of fine feeds being one feature worth having on our lathes. I did
            > not
            > > > realize the truth in your advice until I had a lot of experience
            > using the
            > > > QCGB in the fine feed mode.
            > > >
            > > > You are so right! Depending on the material being worked on, the
            > shape or
            > > > type of toolbit being used, and of course the overall appearance
            > of the
            > > > finished job, this feature shows it's value very nicely.
            > > >
            > > > Whether or not we use a QC box, it is information worthy of being
            > repeated,
            > > > especially to rookies like me!
            > > >
            > > > Thanks once again. Richard
            >
          • kirkbecnel@comcast.net
            Not only is price a factor, but space. Especially when the wife thinks a car is supposed to sit in the garage. Seems to me a feed independent of the spindle
            Message 5 of 10 , Sep 5, 2002
              Not only is price a factor, but space. Especially when the wife thinks a car is supposed to sit in the garage.

              Seems to me a feed independent of the spindle speed would be fairly easy to construct, but you would not be able to cut accurate threads on it.
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: j.w.early@...
              To: mlathemods@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Thursday, September 05, 2002 1:48 PM
              Subject: Re: [mlathemods] Re: FYI


              Paul
              Yes but how many can afford to get a Hardinge HLV for
              their play pen.
              JWE
              > Rich and James,
              >
              > I couldn't agree more with what is said. However, after using a
              > Hardinge (albeit only a few times) I would say that using a feed
              > mechanism that is infinitely variable (within the upper and lower
              > limits of the drive mechanism) is the way to go. The Hardinge feed
              > system gives the operator complete freedom over the best feed rate
              > which can change as the diameter of the piece is reduced. In
              > addition, you won't have to worry about which gear configuration
              > you're in to depend on the feed rate you use for a specific cut.
              > Another advantage is that the feed mechanism is completely divorced
              > form the spindle speed.
              >
              > I would rate the QCGB as a very good second choice alternative for a
              > feed mechanism. Although there were other factors that contributed
              > to it, I had the best machined finishes using that Hardinge than I
              > ever had using the old, but extremely rigid and heavy, Hendey lathe
              > my dad had, which had a QCGB. Unfotunately, my dad gave away the
              > Hendey and I cannot make a direct comparison using the same tool post
              > holder, insert tooling, etc. to get a more accurate feel for the
              > quality of turnings using a QCGB.
              >
              > Paul
              >
              > --- In mlathemods@y..., j.w.early@w... wrote:
              > > Richard
              > > The point I wanted to make in the discussion at that
              > > time was that with a QC box on the lathe it is easy and
              > > convienent to select the most effective feed rate rather
              > > than the one that was setup at the moment.
              > >
              > > One can then use a coarser, faster feed for roughing out
              > > the shape and then with a flick of the lever switch to a
              > > finer, slower feed for the finish cuts. Saves time and
              > > frustration and because the operator is not half asleep
              > > from so many slow passes to remove excess material less
              > > scrap will be produced and so even less frustration.
              > >
              > > Face it QC boxes will make you a more productive and
              > > happier machinest and maybe even save your marriage.
              > >
              > > JWE
              > > Long Beach, CA
              > > > James, This may not be the correct group for this post but here
              > goes anyway.
              > > >
              > > > In a note concerning gear boxes you mentioned the advantage of a
              > selection
              > > > of fine feeds being one feature worth having on our lathes. I did
              > not
              > > > realize the truth in your advice until I had a lot of experience
              > using the
              > > > QCGB in the fine feed mode.
              > > >
              > > > You are so right! Depending on the material being worked on, the
              > shape or
              > > > type of toolbit being used, and of course the overall appearance
              > of the
              > > > finished job, this feature shows it's value very nicely.
              > > >
              > > > Whether or not we use a QC box, it is information worthy of being
              > repeated,
              > > > especially to rookies like me!
              > > >
              > > > Thanks once again. Richard
              >

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              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • paul_probus
              JWE and Kirk, I was not talking about buying a Hardinge, but making the 7x s more like a Hardinge with the independent feed control. In addition, I did not
              Message 6 of 10 , Sep 5, 2002
                JWE and Kirk,

                I was not talking about buying a Hardinge, but making the 7x's more
                like a Hardinge with the independent feed control.

                In addition, I did not mean to say that it would preclude the QCGB
                for threading since manual threading operations are extremely
                difficult when the spindle and carriage feed are not tied together.
                To add both mechanisms to the lathe would give the best of both
                worlds. My intention of mentioning the infinitely variable feed was
                to point out that if someone wanted the QCGB strictly for the ability
                to change feed rates, there is a better, IMHO, route to go. If
                someone wanted the QCGB for threading purposes, they do get an
                additional benefit as JWE pointed out. It all depends on what the
                person's priority is, threading or the ability to vary carriage
                feed.

                Sorry about the confusion, on both counts.

                Paul

                --- In mlathemods@y..., kirkbecnel@c... wrote:
                > Not only is price a factor, but space. Especially when the wife
                thinks a car is supposed to sit in the garage.
                >
                > Seems to me a feed independent of the spindle speed would be fairly
                easy to construct, but you would not be able to cut accurate threads
                on it.
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: j.w.early@w...
                > To: mlathemods@y...
                > Sent: Thursday, September 05, 2002 1:48 PM
                > Subject: Re: [mlathemods] Re: FYI
                >
                >
                > Paul
                > Yes but how many can afford to get a Hardinge HLV for
                > their play pen.
                > JWE
                > > Rich and James,
                > >
                > > I couldn't agree more with what is said. However, after using
                a
                > > Hardinge (albeit only a few times) I would say that using a
                feed
                > > mechanism that is infinitely variable (within the upper and
                lower
                > > limits of the drive mechanism) is the way to go. The Hardinge
                feed
                > > system gives the operator complete freedom over the best feed
                rate
                > > which can change as the diameter of the piece is reduced. In
                > > addition, you won't have to worry about which gear
                configuration
                > > you're in to depend on the feed rate you use for a specific
                cut.
                > > Another advantage is that the feed mechanism is completely
                divorced
                > > form the spindle speed.
                > >
                > > I would rate the QCGB as a very good second choice alternative
                for a
                > > feed mechanism. Although there were other factors that
                contributed
                > > to it, I had the best machined finishes using that Hardinge
                than I
                > > ever had using the old, but extremely rigid and heavy, Hendey
                lathe
                > > my dad had, which had a QCGB. Unfotunately, my dad gave away
                the
                > > Hendey and I cannot make a direct comparison using the same
                tool post
                > > holder, insert tooling, etc. to get a more accurate feel for
                the
                > > quality of turnings using a QCGB.
                > >
                > > Paul
                > >
                > > --- In mlathemods@y..., j.w.early@w... wrote:
                > > > Richard
                > > > The point I wanted to make in the discussion at that
                > > > time was that with a QC box on the lathe it is easy and
                > > > convienent to select the most effective feed rate rather
                > > > than the one that was setup at the moment.
                > > >
                > > > One can then use a coarser, faster feed for roughing out
                > > > the shape and then with a flick of the lever switch to a
                > > > finer, slower feed for the finish cuts. Saves time and
                > > > frustration and because the operator is not half asleep
                > > > from so many slow passes to remove excess material less
                > > > scrap will be produced and so even less frustration.
                > > >
                > > > Face it QC boxes will make you a more productive and
                > > > happier machinest and maybe even save your marriage.
                > > >
                > > > JWE
                > > > Long Beach, CA
                > > > > James, This may not be the correct group for this post but
                here
                > > goes anyway.
                > > > >
                > > > > In a note concerning gear boxes you mentioned the advantage
                of a
                > > selection
                > > > > of fine feeds being one feature worth having on our lathes.
                I did
                > > not
                > > > > realize the truth in your advice until I had a lot of
                experience
                > > using the
                > > > > QCGB in the fine feed mode.
                > > > >
                > > > > You are so right! Depending on the material being worked
                on, the
                > > shape or
                > > > > type of toolbit being used, and of course the overall
                appearance
                > > of the
                > > > > finished job, this feature shows it's value very nicely.
                > > > >
                > > > > Whether or not we use a QC box, it is information worthy of
                being
                > > repeated,
                > > > > especially to rookies like me!
                > > > >
                > > > > Thanks once again. Richard
                > >
                >
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                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Dave Audette
                Now who in the world would go and stick a *car* ( of all things ) into a perfectly good shop ? Probably a symptom of drug use. I mean no disrespect to
                Message 7 of 10 , Sep 5, 2002
                  Now who in the world would go and stick a *car* ( of all things ) into a
                  perfectly good shop ? Probably a symptom of drug use. <G>

                  I mean no disrespect to anyone's wife or loved one, just puzzled over why
                  someone would park a car in a shop. I don't put lathes in the parking lot
                  but to each his own I guess. and hey, I even trimmed off some of the replies

                  Dave
                  Worcester, Mass
                  www.broncosaurus.net

                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: <kirkbecnel@...>
                  To: <mlathemods@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Thursday, September 05, 2002 2:57 PM
                  Subject: Re: [mlathemods] Re: FYI


                  > Not only is price a factor, but space. Especially when the wife thinks a
                  car is supposed to sit in the garage.
                  >
                  > Seems to me a feed independent of the spindle speed would be fairly easy
                  to construct, but you would not be able to cut accurate threads on it.
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: j.w.early@...
                  > To: mlathemods@yahoogroups.com
                  > Sent: Thursday, September 05, 2002 1:48 PM
                  > Subject: Re: [mlathemods] Re: FYI
                  >
                  >
                  > Paul
                  > Yes but how many can afford to get a Hardinge HLV for
                  > their play pen.
                  > JWE
                  > > Rich and James,
                  > >
                  > > I couldn't agree more with what is said. However, after using a
                  > > Hardinge (albeit only a few times) I would say that using a feed
                  > > mechanism that is infinitely variable (within the upper and lower
                  > > limits of the drive mechanism) is the way to go. The Hardinge feed
                  > > system gives the operator complete freedom over the best feed rate
                  > > which can change as the diameter of the piece is reduced. In
                  > > addition, you won't have to worry about which gear configuration
                  > > you're in to depend on the feed rate you use for a specific cut.
                  > > Another advantage is that the feed mechanism is completely divorced
                  > > form the spindle speed.
                  > >
                  > > I would rate the QCGB as a very good second choice alternative for a
                  > > feed mechanism. Although there were other factors that contributed
                  > > to it, I had the best machined finishes using that Hardinge than I
                  > > ever had using the old, but extremely rigid and heavy, Hendey lathe
                  > > my dad had, which had a QCGB. Unfotunately, my dad gave away the
                  > > Hendey and I cannot make a direct comparison using the same tool post
                  > > holder, insert tooling, etc. to get a more accurate feel for the
                  > > quality of turnings using a QCGB.
                  > >
                  > > Paul
                  > >
                • RNH
                  ... From: paul_probus To: mlathemods@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, September 05, 2002 3:18 PM Subject: [mlathemods] Re: FYI JWE and Kirk, I was not talking
                  Message 8 of 10 , Sep 5, 2002
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: paul_probus
                    To: mlathemods@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Thursday, September 05, 2002 3:18 PM
                    Subject: [mlathemods] Re: FYI


                    JWE and Kirk,

                    I was not talking about buying a Hardinge, but making the 7x's more
                    like a Hardinge with the independent feed control.

                    Paul,

                    Please note that the gearbox I made up allows a motor driven fine feed unit to be plugged on to the outboard end of the box as is stated in the text, and is shown on the left end of the box in the photo. My box has a neutral position allowing the screw shaft to turn free of the driving gears.One must disengage the forward /reverse lever on the rear of the lathe as well.

                    It does offer both feed methods relatively cheaply. Richard






                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • j.w.early@worldnet.att.net
                    See now Richard was ahead in the long run to satisfy all questions that would arise on his project. See what happens when someone sits down and plans out a
                    Message 9 of 10 , Sep 5, 2002
                      See now Richard was ahead in the long run to satisfy all
                      questions that would arise on his project. See what
                      happens when someone sits down and plans out a project.
                      Very good results.
                      JWE
                      >
                      > ----- Original Message -----
                      > From: paul_probus
                      > To: mlathemods@yahoogroups.com
                      > Sent: Thursday, September 05, 2002 3:18 PM
                      > Subject: [mlathemods] Re: FYI
                      >
                      >
                      > JWE and Kirk,
                      >
                      > I was not talking about buying a Hardinge, but making the 7x's more
                      > like a Hardinge with the independent feed control.
                      >
                      > Paul,
                      >
                      > Please note that the gearbox I made up allows a motor driven fine feed unit to
                      > be plugged on to the outboard end of the box as is stated in the text, and is
                      > shown on the left end of the box in the photo. My box has a neutral position
                      > allowing the screw shaft to turn free of the driving gears.One must disengage
                      > the forward /reverse lever on the rear of the lathe as well.
                      >
                      > It does offer both feed methods relatively cheaply. Richard
                      >
                    • Bob Loesch
                      Gee, I bought a house with a one-car garage, and a carport so that I could use the garage for a shop, and still have a place for the car. Then the garage got
                      Message 10 of 10 , Sep 5, 2002
                        Gee, I bought a house with a one-car garage, and a carport so that I could
                        use the garage for a shop, and still have a place for the car. Then the
                        garage got filled up with 'in-law' furniture, and the shop moved out to the
                        carport, displacing the car. The 'stuff' grew and displaced the shop again
                        and I put up a 'garage awning', which started to fill up as well, so I got
                        one of those Costco/HF 'Portable Garages' and moved the awning over to the
                        other side of the driveway. Now the shop, transplanted to the 'Portable
                        Garage' is AGAIN full of 'stuff', and there is barely enough room to
                        squeeze my wife's car under the awning.
                        The upshot of this is: can anybody find a way to convince my wife to park
                        somewhere else?
                        ;-)


                        At 03:45 PM 9/5/02 -0400, Dave Audette wrote:
                        >I mean no disrespect to anyone's wife or loved one, just puzzled over why
                        >someone would park a car in a shop. I don't put lathes in the parking lot
                        >but to each his own I guess. and hey, I even trimmed off some of the replies


                        Regards,
                        Cuckoobob, in beautiful Lake County, California, USA

                        Cuckoobob's (more than just Cuckoo) Clocks, 707-272-7070

                        I buy (too often), sell (too seldom), repair (too few),
                        and collect (too many) cuckoo clocks

                        NAWCC 140818
                        http://www.cuckoobob.com
                        mailto:Bob@...
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