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MAKING A SURVIVAL SEED CONTAINER

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  • Lawrence
    Greetings! I have been curious for a while about these survival seed packages and seed collections that companies and organizations have been selling. In the
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 4, 2010
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      Greetings!

      I have been curious for a while about these survival seed packages and seed collections that companies and organizations have been selling.

      In the spirit of self-sufficency, I asked myself "WHY COULDN'T I MAKE MY OWN?"

      After a little bit of research and knowing what seeds might withstand a year or two (e.g. parsnips, do not last more than a year), I tried to devise several approaches.

      -Get fresh seeds- hybrid or hertiage (non-GM0) from suppliers.
      -Store in a can or water proof container.
      -Put in a freezer for long term storage.
      -Label the seeds and container with contents, date of storage, etc.

      Ok, folks, now I am asking you for input and thoughts.

      -Do I need a fancy metal bag to store the seeds? Some have them, others do not.

      -Do I need plastic bags to contain the pre-packaged seeds?

      -If the seeds are good for 2010, then I understand that they may last as long as 4 to 5 years in deep cold storage. Any thoughts?

      -YES, I know that the final proof of seed longevity will be test sprouting some of the seed with water and on a tissue paper when I finally need them.

      -YES, I know I should favor heritage (non-hybrid, non-GMO) seed IF I wish to use some of the seeds from my first harvest to plan for NEXT year's harvest.

      The point I also want to get out is that IF I can order the seeds now -via catalogs, online, or at stores-many seeds are at discount (40-50% off) and then I take the seed and store them for future needs-after the fall (or SHTF or whatever).

      Furthermore, I would save money on purchasing what seeds I want rather than paying $50, $70, or even $150 for a seed canister (and I can use a clean coffee can or tupperware container just as well!).

      Any thoughts?

      I would appreciate any and all thoughts on the subject.

      Thank you all in advance.

      Best wishes.

      Lawrence
    • Marjory
      I use some plastic ammo cans I bought from Academy for seed storage. they are air and water tight, strong, lighweight, and inexpensive. I ve had problems with
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 5, 2010
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        I use some plastic ammo cans I bought from Academy for seed storage.
        they are air and water tight, strong, lighweight, and inexpensive. I've
        had problems with metal as it rusts and is diffiuctl in the long run.

        I use cat litter as in inexpensive dessicant to keep moisture levels low.

        Marjory
      • Katherine Hayford
        Ok, I ll give you my opinion. I don t like the survival seed packages for several reasons. First, most of the seeds offered in the ones I ve looked at are
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 5, 2010
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          Ok, I'll give you my opinion. I don't like the survival seed packages for
          several reasons. First, most of the seeds offered in the ones I've looked
          at are hybrids. Second, you don't just put the seed in the ground and it
          grows. Growing plants and food is a learned activity and like thinking all
          you need to do is put a mule in the pasture, a wagon in the barn and then
          when you need it things will be just like getting in a car and driving off.
          Third, seeds will last for different time periods and the companies that
          offer these don't take that into account. So, that's what I feel about the
          buy a survival pack seeds; they make money for those selling them and that
          is all they do.



          You can make your own but if you are trying to make a clone of the offered
          packs then you are again missing the boat. The first year I grew tomatoes
          from seed I started with close to 100 seeds, had them germinate about 68,
          and got tomatoes from the 5 surviving plants. These were hybrid seeds which
          tend to grow better in a lot of cases than the OP. Now I save my seeds and
          have close to 98% survival of the seeds. That's counting each cell I plant
          with a couple of seeds germinating at least one of the seeds. This year I
          had three cells that didn't grow and those were from some seeds I got in a
          seed swap. It's taken me years to get this good and in an emergency you
          don't have years to learn how to grow food. Having never tried parsnips I
          have no idea how long they will last but I planted and grew some tomatoes
          seeds that were over 5 yo this year.



          So, going by your list. Don't waste your time with hybrid seeds. When you
          save seeds from a hybrid plant you don't get what the parent was, you get
          which ever genes happen to come out on top. Stick to OP (open pollinated)
          seeds whether heirloom, heritage or not.



          The can would work or you could use a canning jar.

          Don't worry about putting in the freezer, the frig will work as well but
          keep them in the dark.

          They don't have to be sealed



          Now for the parts you are forgetting. It takes more than a season to learn
          to grow food. If you want to have seeds and the ability to grow your own
          food, than you need to be growing every year. You need to try a variety of
          seeds and plants to see which ones your family likes and doesn't like. When
          you are growing each year than the seeds you are storing will not go bad
          because they are being rotated out as the years pass. You will have a
          supply of seeds and food that is appealing to your family. That's my
          recommendation and I'm now on my way out to transplant the last of the
          tomatoes into hanging planters to help keep them growing without the bugs
          and such that get on the ones that I put the planter on the ground. Then
          I'll transplant some strawberries the same way. This afternoon I'll set up
          and plant in my hydroponics unit which allows me to grow broccoli in the
          middle of summer.



          Pernkat



          The government of the United States is not in any sense founded upon the
          Christian religion. - John Addams 6th President (1767 - 1848)

          _____

          On Behalf Of Lawrence
          Sent: Friday, June 04, 2010 12:27 PM
          Subject: [MSM] MAKING A SURVIVAL SEED CONTAINER







          Greetings!

          I have been curious for a while about these survival seed packages and seed
          collections that companies and organizations have been selling.

          In the spirit of self-sufficency, I asked myself "WHY COULDN'T I MAKE MY
          OWN?"

          After a little bit of research and knowing what seeds might withstand a year
          or two (e.g. parsnips, do not last more than a year), I tried to devise
          several approaches.

          -Get fresh seeds- hybrid or hertiage (non-GM0) from suppliers.
          -Store in a can or water proof container.
          -Put in a freezer for long term storage.
          -Label the seeds and container with contents, date of storage, etc.

          Ok, folks, now I am asking you for input and thoughts.

          -Do I need a fancy metal bag to store the seeds? Some have them, others do
          not.

          -Do I need plastic bags to contain the pre-packaged seeds?

          -If the seeds are good for 2010, then I understand that they may last as
          long as 4 to 5 years in deep cold storage. Any thoughts?

          -YES, I know that the final proof of seed longevity will be test sprouting
          some of the seed with water and on a tissue paper when I finally need them.

          -YES, I know I should favor heritage (non-hybrid, non-GMO) seed IF I wish to
          use some of the seeds from my first harvest to plan for NEXT year's harvest.

          The point I also want to get out is that IF I can order the seeds now -via
          catalogs, online, or at stores-many seeds are at discount (40-50% off) and
          then I take the seed and store them for future needs-after the fall (or SHTF
          or whatever).

          Furthermore, I would save money on purchasing what seeds I want rather than
          paying $50, $70, or even $150 for a seed canister (and I can use a clean
          coffee can or tupperware container just as well!).

          Any thoughts?

          I would appreciate any and all thoughts on the subject.

          Thank you all in advance.

          Best wishes.

          Lawrence



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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • JonquilJan
          What Pernkat said - plus - not all veggies are annuals. Some take 2 years to produce seeds to save for replanting. Carrots is one that comes to mind. Read
          Message 4 of 7 , Jun 5, 2010
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            What Pernkat said - plus - not all veggies are annuals. Some take 2 years
            to produce seeds to save for replanting. Carrots is one that comes to mind.

            Read 'Saving Seeds' by Marc Rogers to get good information.

            Jan

            Learn something new every day
            As long as you are learning, you are living
            When you stop learning, you start dying
          • W J Seidl
            To expand what Pernkat mentioned is that not all seeds are meant for where you are trying to grow them. By growing the veggies for a few years in the place
            Message 5 of 7 , Jun 5, 2010
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              To expand what Pernkat mentioned is that
              not all seeds are meant for where you are trying to grow them.
              By growing the veggies for a few years in the place where you will be ,
              you allow the plant to become acclimated to the soils and
              climate of where you are, helping ensure success.

              It has taken us years of growing, year after year, to get our heirloom
              open pollinated seeds
              to grow where we put them. They originally didn't like the "lovely
              collection of
              clay and rocks" that comprises our soil up here. Some still don't and
              they struggle, but most hang in
              there and produce a crop. From those, we select the most vigorous
              plants, the ones that produce
              the best fruit, and save the fruit from them for seed for the following
              year. Always save the best.

              Having acclimated, vigorous seed stock makes germination and success
              much more likely in the event of
              a catastrophe, where you NEED those plants to survive in order to feed
              your family.

              If you are planning to shelter in place, and already have your growing
              plots in production,
              now is the time to improve the soil, not when you "need" it. Soil
              fertility is at an all time low in this country
              thanks to years of reliance on chemical fertilizers, herbicides and
              insecticides.
              I won't tell you here how to improve the soil where you are...
              you can Google it. Prepare to be overwhelmed <g>.

              Hydroponics aside, of course. Good luck getting nutrients to buy and
              pumps to run the system
              when TSHTF.

              Remember too that having veggies growing does not mean you won't be hungry.
              You need to put up a years worth of food to tide you over until the
              crops come in, if they come in.

              Best,
              Wayne in Maine

              SNIP
              >
              >
              > Now for the parts you are forgetting. It takes more than a season to learn
              > to grow food. If you want to have seeds and the ability to grow your own
              > food, than you need to be growing every year. SNIP
              >
              > Pernkat
              >
              >
              > .
              >
              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Bill, in Tn
              Marjory, If they are plastic, they aren t completely airtight. For air can eventually work its way into the container. Better to store in sealed mylar bags, if
              Message 6 of 7 , Jun 5, 2010
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                Marjory,

                If they are plastic, they aren't completely airtight. For air can
                eventually work its way into the container. Better to store in sealed
                mylar bags, if using plastic anything. That is why we use mylar bags in
                most food storage, in those plastic buckets.

                Bill

                Marjory wrote:
                > I use some plastic ammo cans I bought from Academy for seed storage.
                > they are air and water tight, strong, lighweight, and inexpensive. I've
                > had problems with metal as it rusts and is diffiuctl in the long run.
                >
                > I use cat litter as in inexpensive dessicant to keep moisture levels low.
                >
                > Marjory
              • Sean M
                I ve been taking a workshop on recovering soil fertility lately. An excellent book to read would be Science In Agriculture by Arden Andersen. It s not so
                Message 7 of 7 , Jun 6, 2010
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                  I've been taking a workshop on recovering soil fertility lately. An excellent book to read would be "Science In Agriculture" by Arden Andersen. It's not so bad to learn in my opinion. Conventional fertilizers have indeed damaged soil, as have all of the other chemicals. Just having a lawn leaves soil vulnerable to having it's nutrients washed out, as will tilling deeply beyond the first year.

                  This will be a major area to understand for future survival. Many of the "problems" inherent to gardening will go away once you know how to tune your soil and what to observe to give hints as to how to get it back on track (which plants do well verses which don't, tempered with climate and micro-climate conditions, etc). Look for the "nutrient dense farming" videos on youtube. The most interesting differences once you get it right are taste, nutritional value, shelf life & qualities, etc.


                  -Sean.
                  --- In misc_survivalism_moderated, W J Seidl wrote:
                  >
                  > To expand what Pernkat mentioned is that
                  > <snip>
                  > If you are planning to shelter in place, and already have your
                  > growing plots in production, now is the time to improve the soil,
                  > not when you "need" it. Soil fertility is at an all time low in
                  > this country thanks to years of reliance on chemical fertilizers,
                  > herbicides and insecticides. I won't tell you here how to improve
                  > the soil where you are... you can Google it. Prepare to be
                  > overwhelmed <g>.
                  > <snip>
                  > Best,
                  > Wayne in Maine
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