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Re: [MSM] Re: Living off-grid is not hard! //propane tanks

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  • Buckshot
    Kim, No upstairs here, bought the ranch intentionally. Had lived in a tri-level before we moved and it was real hard on my Mom. Mom had both hips bad when we
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 1, 2010
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      Kim,

      No upstairs here, bought the ranch intentionally. Had lived in a tri-level
      before we moved and it was real hard on my Mom.

      Mom had both hips bad when we moved here and they were just starting to
      develop the hip replacement surgery then. That was 1971.

      They actually replaced her hips in 1979. That was VERY EARLY in hip
      replacement as a "normal" procedure. They did her hips two weeks apart.
      Dr's wore what looked very much like a space suit and had a "tail" on it
      that basically was a tunnel back to where they donned them at, and the
      operating room was kept at a higher pressure than the suits and associated
      rooms (positive overpressure) as they were not sure what germs might get
      into the long upper leg bones and pelvis and do what to the patient yet.
      They had her on a tilt table the second week and got her upright, but still
      with no pressure on the leg the day before they did the second hip. Then
      started all over again. She was in the hospital for 5 or 6 weeks.

      On the other hand, I had one hip done in 1998 and they had me up and on it
      (not much, but on it) the next day and I was discharged in 5 days. None of
      that stuff with the operating room, either.

      Buckshot


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Kim Godfrey" <dobe.lover@...>
      To: "Misc.Survivalism Moderated Group"
      <misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, April 01, 2010 1:20 AM
      Subject: Re: [MSM] Re: Living off-grid is not hard! //propane tanks


      >
      > Buckshot,
      >
      > Your house sounds very similar to ours, but ours isn't quite as
      > sheltered in the back. It was added onto at one end only, and also had an
      > upstairs added to that end at the same time, and a deck with a carport
      > below it. Because our cars are parked on the driveway in front of the
      > carport and garage entrances, no one can see the back yard from the front,
      > and the room that juts out in the back keeps it from being seen from one
      > side. In the sheltered area beside the room (in back), is a large patio,
      > and that's where our grill is. It would be a very small matter to hide it
      > completely, as well as outdoor propane tanks.
      >
      > Kim
      >>>
      >>> ----- Original Message -----
      >>> From: Buckshot
      >>> To: misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com
      >>> Sent: Wednesday, March 31, 2010 4:49 AM
      >>> Subject: Re: [MSM] Re: Living off-grid is not hard!
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> Kim,
      >>>
      >>> That is one thing that happened by accident but worked out nicely for
      >>me.
      >>>
      >>> We are in a 125 (approx.) small lot subdivision. Lots are 90' X 120'.
      >> I
      >>> don't particularly like it, but it is what we have.
      >>>
      >>> Our house is a ranch over a crawl space. It was one long house,
      >>including
      >>> the built in garage. 75' long by 30' - 35' wide (guessing, never
      >>measured
      >>> it that way). It was not large enough when we moved here, so when we
      >>bought
      >>> we contracted for an extra room. 14' X 14' off of the back just north
      >>of
      >>> the middle of the house. Later things got tight and, instead of
      >>moving, we
      >>> added on again. A 14' X 24" room and a 14' X 8' shop on the end of
      >>that.
      >>> So that one is 14' X 32' in total on the south end of the house. So
      >>we now
      >>> have a capital F house with a patio between the arms of the F and a
      >>12' X
      >>> 12' storage shed just out past the end of the longer arm and centered
      >>> between the arms. That gives an are surrounded on what I would call 3
      >>1/2
      >>> sides and still open for air and ventilated. That is where the gas
      >>grill
      >>> goes if I want it fairly unobservable and that is where the generator
      >>sets
      >>> up in the case of a power outage, to keep it safe and protected. I
      >>> can
      >>> watch that area from 2 windows, a sliding patio door and a standard
      >>door.
      >>>
      >>> So, we almost have a southwestern or Spanish style enclosed courtyard.
      >>>
      >>> Buckshot
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > ************************************************************************
      >
      >
      > Please check out our new Blog "Daily Survival"
      > http://daily-survival.blogspot.com/
      >
      >
      >
      > ************************************************************************
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    • Kim Godfrey
      Wow, I never knew the hip replacement surgery had been like that in its early days. What a change since then! Our part of the house is the downstairs, so the
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 2, 2010
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        Wow, I never knew the hip replacement surgery had been like that in its early days. What a change since then!

        Our part of the house is the downstairs, so the only steps we have are one to get onto the front porch, and one to go down into the garage. Unfortunately, my mother, who is 85 now, lives in the upstairs part, and it's getting to be difficult for her to navigate the steps more than once or twice a day. They are sheltered and roofed over, but not totally enclosed, so if we get one of those chairs that goes up the stairs on a rail, it'll have to be the more expensive "outside" variety, which is protected against the elements. Don't know how much that would cost, though, and I don't know if Medicare would pay anything toward having it installed. Unfortunately, an elevator is out, because there's nowhere to install it, where there's room at both top and bottom. At some point, we'll either have to move, or get a chair stair climber for her. She can walk around fine, but the stairs are the issue. If we had to work it out off-grid, I'm not sure how we'd supply the power for such a thing. Even a dumbwaiter would come in handy for getting her groceries upstairs, and we might be able to make room for that. I've looked online for plans to build one ourselves, but haven't come up with anything that looks good.

        Kim

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Buckshot
        To: misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, April 01, 2010 5:13 AM
        Subject: Re: [MSM] Re: Living off-grid is not hard! //propane tanks


        Kim,

        No upstairs here, bought the ranch intentionally. Had lived in a tri-level
        before we moved and it was real hard on my Mom.

        Mom had both hips bad when we moved here and they were just starting to
        develop the hip replacement surgery then. That was 1971.

        They actually replaced her hips in 1979. That was VERY EARLY in hip
        replacement as a "normal" procedure. They did her hips two weeks apart.
        Dr's wore what looked very much like a space suit and had a "tail" on it
        that basically was a tunnel back to where they donned them at, and the
        operating room was kept at a higher pressure than the suits and associated
        rooms (positive overpressure) as they were not sure what germs might get
        into the long upper leg bones and pelvis and do what to the patient yet.
        They had her on a tilt table the second week and got her upright, but still
        with no pressure on the leg the day before they did the second hip. Then
        started all over again. She was in the hospital for 5 or 6 weeks.

        On the other hand, I had one hip done in 1998 and they had me up and on it
        (not much, but on it) the next day and I was discharged in 5 days. None of
        that stuff with the operating room, either.

        Buckshot


        rus/

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Buckshot
        Kim, Dumbwaiter or elevator, all you would have to do is have room to put the door in on each floor. It would be easier to have the shaft outside than inside.
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 2, 2010
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          Kim,

          Dumbwaiter or elevator, all you would have to do is have room to put the
          door in on each floor. It would be easier to have the shaft outside than
          inside.

          If you want some ideas look at those temporary elevators used on
          construction sites. End up with basically something the size of a
          porta-john going up and down the side of the house.

          Buckshot

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Kim Godfrey" <dobe.lover@...>
          To: <misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Friday, April 02, 2010 8:07 AM
          Subject: Re: [MSM] Re: Living off-grid is not hard! //propane tanks


          > Wow, I never knew the hip replacement surgery had been like that in its
          > early days. What a change since then!
          >
          > Our part of the house is the downstairs, so the only steps we have are one
          > to get onto the front porch, and one to go down into the garage.
          > Unfortunately, my mother, who is 85 now, lives in the upstairs part, and
          > it's getting to be difficult for her to navigate the steps more than once
          > or twice a day. They are sheltered and roofed over, but not totally
          > enclosed, so if we get one of those chairs that goes up the stairs on a
          > rail, it'll have to be the more expensive "outside" variety, which is
          > protected against the elements. Don't know how much that would cost,
          > though, and I don't know if Medicare would pay anything toward having it
          > installed. Unfortunately, an elevator is out, because there's nowhere to
          > install it, where there's room at both top and bottom. At some point,
          > we'll either have to move, or get a chair stair climber for her. She can
          > walk around fine, but the stairs are the issue. If we had to work it out
          > off-grid, I'm not sure how we'd supply the power for such a thing. Even a
          > dumbwaiter would come in handy for getting her groceries upstairs, and we
          > might be able to make room for that. I've looked online for plans to
          > build one ourselves, but haven't come up with anything that looks good.
          >
          > Kim
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: Buckshot
          > To: misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Thursday, April 01, 2010 5:13 AM
          > Subject: Re: [MSM] Re: Living off-grid is not hard! //propane tanks
          >
          >
          > Kim,
          >
          > No upstairs here, bought the ranch intentionally. Had lived in a
          > tri-level
          > before we moved and it was real hard on my Mom.
          >
          > Mom had both hips bad when we moved here and they were just starting to
          > develop the hip replacement surgery then. That was 1971.
          >
          > They actually replaced her hips in 1979. That was VERY EARLY in hip
          > replacement as a "normal" procedure. They did her hips two weeks apart.
          > Dr's wore what looked very much like a space suit and had a "tail" on it
          > that basically was a tunnel back to where they donned them at, and the
          > operating room was kept at a higher pressure than the suits and
          > associated
          > rooms (positive overpressure) as they were not sure what germs might get
          > into the long upper leg bones and pelvis and do what to the patient yet.
          > They had her on a tilt table the second week and got her upright, but
          > still
          > with no pressure on the leg the day before they did the second hip. Then
          > started all over again. She was in the hospital for 5 or 6 weeks.
          >
          > On the other hand, I had one hip done in 1998 and they had me up and on
          > it
          > (not much, but on it) the next day and I was discharged in 5 days. None
          > of
          > that stuff with the operating room, either.
          >
          > Buckshot
          >
          >
          > rus/
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > ************************************************************************
          >
          >
          > Please check out our new Blog "Daily Survival"
          > http://daily-survival.blogspot.com/
          >
          >
          >
          > ************************************************************************
          > **IMPORTANT GROUP INFORMATION**
          >
          > Group Email Addresses
          >
          > Post message: misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com
          > Subscribe: misc_survivalism_moderated-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > List owner: misc_survivalism_moderated-owner@yahoogroups.com Yahoo!
          > Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
        • Kim Godfrey
          Ah, but here s the rub: because of the arrangement, there is nowhere that will work as a place to have a shaft. If there s room upstairs on the deck, then
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 3, 2010
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            Ah, but here's the rub: because of the arrangement, there is nowhere that will work as a place to have a shaft. If there's room upstairs on the deck, then it's in the friggin' middle of the carport, and if there's room downstairs, it's underneath the stairs up to the deck, or inside the laundry room (too small to add an elevator), or covering up the window to the garage or the front door upstairs. We've tried to think of everything, but there just doesn't seem to be any answer. I suppose when the time comes, we may have to convert that add-on room downstairs into a bedroom, but then we'd have to share the kitchen and bathroom. However, everything she used would then be on one level, and it may come down to that. By that time, I hope we won't still be living here, but you never know.

            Kim

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Buckshot
            To: misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Saturday, April 03, 2010 1:07 AM
            Subject: Re: [MSM] Re: Living off-grid is not hard! //propane tanks


            Kim,

            Dumbwaiter or elevator, all you would have to do is have room to put the
            door in on each floor. It would be easier to have the shaft outside than
            inside.

            If you want some ideas look at those temporary elevators used on
            construction sites. End up with basically something the size of a
            porta-john going up and down the side of the house.

            Buckshot
          • Buckshot
            We have a building here in town called Memorial Hall. It was built around the turn of the 20th century for a very large Grand Army of the Republic meeting. It
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 3, 2010
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              We have a building here in town called Memorial Hall.

              It was built around the turn of the 20th century for a very large Grand Army
              of the Republic meeting.

              It is county property so they had to make it handicap access complaint.

              Most of it is a very large auditorium/stage and they have offices for the
              various veterans organizations around the auditorium.

              They ended up building a free standing elevator outside of the building.
              You enter the elevator through one door, you exit on your floor through the
              door on the other side and cross an enclosed "bridge" or "skyway" to the
              floor you chose.

              Kind of strange, and extra money, but that is what they had to do to make it
              handicap complaint.

              The elevator shaft itself is covered by sheet metal like used on a metal
              building. They got it in a red to match the bricks.of the building.

              Or, if all else fails, just invent the transporter from Star Trek and she
              can just beam up and down!C

              ;^)

              Buckshot

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Kim Godfrey" <dobe.lover@...>
              To: <misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Saturday, April 03, 2010 8:09 AM
              Subject: Re: [MSM] Re: Living off-grid is not hard! //propane tanks


              > Ah, but here's the rub: because of the arrangement, there is nowhere that
              > will work as a place to have a shaft. If there's room upstairs on the
              > deck, then it's in the friggin' middle of the carport, and if there's room
              > downstairs, it's underneath the stairs up to the deck, or inside the
              > laundry room (too small to add an elevator), or covering up the window to
              > the garage or the front door upstairs. We've tried to think of
              > everything, but there just doesn't seem to be any answer. I suppose when
              > the time comes, we may have to convert that add-on room downstairs into a
              > bedroom, but then we'd have to share the kitchen and bathroom. However,
              > everything she used would then be on one level, and it may come down to
              > that. By that time, I hope we won't still be living here, but you never
              > know.
              >
              > Kim
              >
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: Buckshot
              > To: misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Saturday, April 03, 2010 1:07 AM
              > Subject: Re: [MSM] Re: Living off-grid is not hard! //propane tanks
              >
              >
              > Kim,
              >
              > Dumbwaiter or elevator, all you would have to do is have room to put the
              > door in on each floor. It would be easier to have the shaft outside than
              > inside.
              >
              > If you want some ideas look at those temporary elevators used on
              > construction sites. End up with basically something the size of a
              > porta-john going up and down the side of the house.
              >
              > Buckshot
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > ************************************************************************
              >
              >
              > Please check out our new Blog "Daily Survival"
              > http://daily-survival.blogspot.com/
              >
              >
              >
              > ************************************************************************
              > **IMPORTANT GROUP INFORMATION**
              >
              > Group Email Addresses
              >
              > Post message: misc_survivalism_moderated@yahoogroups.com
              > Subscribe: misc_survivalism_moderated-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > List owner: misc_survivalism_moderated-owner@yahoogroups.com Yahoo!
              > Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
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